Guitarist Kevin Estrella’s project Pyramids On Mars has a new album being released on December 21, 2019, entitled “Edge of the Black”. The full length offers up an aural palette of intense instrumental progressive shredding rock that’s emotional, provocative and 4-dimensional.

Teaming up with MusicLegends.caPyramids On Mars is premiering the next single ‘The Ambassador’ here.Estrella explains the track in further detail:“The idea for The Ambassador was actually sparked from the guitar it was played on. It is played on a Signature ‘Aurora’ Guitar. Built by the Signature Guitar Company sometime around 1987. Alex Lifeson of Rush made the guitar famous playing it exclusively for the albums “Hold Your Fire” and “Show of Hands”. Alex designed the guitar, along with Russ Heinl. What makes it unique is the balance of Basswood (from a rare variety found only in Quebec) and has the three active single-coil pickups, giving the guitar a very unique: clear, bright yet warm distinctive sound. No guitar sounds like it. It was meant to be the ultimate Superstrat. It’s almost like an acoustic guitar on hyperdrive. Only 500 Signatures were ever made. My Signature Aurora is quite unique. The original owner purchased it from Steve’s Music Store in Toronto back in the late eighties. It was a floor model. It doesn’t even have a serial number. It is quite the collector’s item.   The Ambassador was written by-that-guitar. I didn’t write the song, the Signature guitar did.Speaking of Rush, the song is heavily influenced by Rush’s early works from the eighties. The concert video Show of Hands comes to mind was a huge influence on the Edge of the Black sound, particularly in the songs The Ambassador and Arcturian Rain. The theme of the song is about an Ambassador who has been selected from Earth, chosen to be a spokesperson for the people of Earth. Scientists found a way to open a portal to another galaxy and he was chosen to go through it and hopefully meet some Extraterrestrial nation on the other side. Some other interesting things come to mind in the song. The guitar solo is doing some interesting combinations of two-note per string sweep picking, combined with string skipping arpeggios a-la Paul Gilbert style. The solo ends in a nice diatonic extension arpeggio legato phrasing. These and other techniques I teach on my online instructional guitar lessons https://pyramidsonmarsguitarlessons.pivotshare.com/

Following Pyramids On Mars’ two previous albums, “Edge of the Black” was written, composed and performed solely by Kevin Estrella who cites influences from musical greats including J.S Bach and Antonio Vivaldi along with today’s guitar virtuosos Yngwie Malmsteen and Joe Satriani“Edge of the Black” pays homage to these artists while still maintaining Estrella’s own creative flair. Estrella shares his thoughts on the album:

“On Edge of The Black, I wanted to put emphasis on songwriting and telling a story. The emphasis is not just on the lead guitar melody, but on the band as a whole. Harmonic variations on repeating themes are strongly utilized; like rhyming phrases in spoken language that allows easier accurate retelling of the original story. This idea of repeating music phrases/themes so the audience can easily recall it and hum it all the way home.” 

“Edge of The Black” pre-order available on Bandcamp.

Singles:
 F-22 Raptor’ here.
‘Song of Light’ here.
‘Nacht Waffen’ here.

Track Listing:
1. Blood Moon 5:42
2. Nacht Waffen 6:56
3. Song of Light 5:44
4. F-22 Raptor 5:53
5. The Ambassador 4:57
6. Mercury Magnetar 4:58
7. Arcturian Rain 4:38
8. Time to Believe 4:40
9. Arioso Lullaby 4:39
10. Whale Song 4:28
Album Length: 52:40
For more info:
PyramidsOnMars.com
Facebook
Instagram

About:

Every once in awhile there comes along a band that is so different or unique, you would think they were dropped on Earth from another planet.  Pyramids On Mars is one of those bands. What first catches you, is that they are an instrumental band. A combination of elements such as hard rock, industrial, metal and psychedelic rock: and then the lead guitar comes soaring in.  Well crafted, beautiful, melodic phrases so catchy and memorable they will be stuck in your head for the rest of the day.  

Pyramids On Mars is the solo project of guitarist Kevin Estrella.  He wanted to do something musically different that would stand out from the crowd. Estrella’s musical style is very similar to world-renowned rock guitarist Joe Satriani, so much so that Estrella has nicknamed himself the “Satriani of the North.”

“Of course Satriani has had a huge influence on me,” he says “But he (Satriani) does more of a bluesy thing whereas I am more influenced by classical music.  I absolutely love the Baroque classical composers J.S Bach and Antonio Vivaldi who are my biggest musical influences.

Estrella recorded, produced, engineered and mastered his debut album, self-titled “Pyramids On Mars” in 2013.  Since then, he has been capturing music industry attention-getting international radio airplay in the U.S, Canada, South America, and Europe.  He is a regular guest on Brian ‘the hammer’ Jackson radio (Los Angeles) to over 4 million listeners and a weekly speaker on Real Rock Radio (Chicago).

Canadian Guitar Prog PYRAMIDS ON MARS Next Single ‘The Ambassador’ Off Upcoming Album Out Dec 21st

Photo credit: Hristo Shindov

California based extreme metal titans SUICIDE SILENCE have released the official music video for the song “Feel Alive”. The track is taken from the band’s sixth studio album, “Become The Hunter”, on February 14, 2020 via Nuclear Blast. The disc was produced by Steve Evetts (THE DILLINGER ESCAPE PLANSEPULTURAHATEBREED) at The Omen Room and mixed by Josh Wilbur (TRIVIUMLAMB OF GODGOJIRA). Ted Jensen (PANTERADEFTONESSLIPKNOT) mastered the album at Sterling Sound Studios in Nashville, Tennessee. The artwork for the album was created by Adrian Baxter.

Like the previously released videos for “Meltdown” and “Love Me To Death”, the “Feel Alive” clip was directed by Scott Hansen of Digital Thunderdome.

“Become The Hunter” track listing:

01. Meltdown 
02. Two Steps 
03. Feel Alive 
04. Love Me To Death 
05. In Hiding 
06. Death’s Anxiety 
07. Skin Tight 
08. The Scythe 
09. Serene Obscene 
10. Disaster Valley 
11. Become The Hunter

SUICIDE SILENCE‘s latest, self-titled album came out in February 2017 via Nuclear Blast Entertainment. The CD was produced by Ross Robinson, who has previously worked with KORNSLIPKNOTLIMP BIZKIT and SEPULTURA, among others, and was mixed by Joe Barresi (KYUSSMELVINSTOOLQUEENS OF THE STONE AGE).

The controversy over the album’s sound — featuring a more melodic and clean singing style, in the vein of acts like DEFTONES and KORN — caused one disgruntled fan to launch a petition to stop the record coming out.

SUICIDE SILENCE‘s performance at the December 2015 benefit show in support of Mental Health America Of Los Angeles (MHLA) at The Observatory in Santa Ana was released this past July as the album “Live & Mental” via Nuclear Blast.

“Live & Mental” was produced by the band while mixing was handled by Josh Gilbert (WOVENWAR, AS I LAY DYING). The cover photos were shot by Jerry John Nicholl.

Video Premiere: SUICIDE SILENCE’s ‘Feel Alive’

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s and 70’s. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

The Ramones “I Wanna Be Sedated”

Joey Ramone came up with the idea for this song after he burned himself with hot water and had to be treated at a hospital. Ramone would inhale steam from a kettle before concerts to help clear his nasal passages.

The chorus, where Ramone sings about “Nothing to do” and “Nowhere to go,” was inspired by their 1977-78 tour when they ended up in London around Christmas. It was their first time in the city, but it was pretty much shut down. Joey and Dee Dee stayed in their hotel and watched movies.

For Johnny Ramone’s guitar solo, he plays the same note 65 times in a row. Very punk.

This was the first song that Marky Ramone recorded with the band (he took over on drums for Tommy Ramone, who stayed on as a producer). He says the song was completed very quickly in the studio, and his part took just two takes. Regarding the musical inspiration for the song, he explained in an interview: “We always loved the ’60s groups: The Kinks, The Who, The Beatles, The Stones, Dave Clark Five, etcetera. And we loved what was done by The Searchers, a band from the ’60s from part of that British Invasion. So we attempted to do our way of doing it, our style, which came out great.”

The song has been used in a number of movies and TV shows. They include:

Movies:
Carpool (1996)
Detroit Rock City (1999)
Daddy Day Care (2003)
Mayor of the Sunset Strip (2003)
The Lather Effect (2006)
Terminator Genisys (2015)

TV Shows:
Gilmore Girls (2002 – “Application Anxiety”)
The West Wing (2003 – “The Long Goodbye”)
Cold Case (2005 – “Blank Generation”)
South Park (2007 – “Guitar Queer-o”)
ER (2007 – “Blackout”)
Constantine (2014 – “The Devil’s Vinyl”)

Ten years after this song was first released, the Ramones made a video for it. Directed by Bill Fishman, it’s one continuous shot of the band sitting at a table while various characters try to distract them. Fishman would later direct the group’s video for “Pet Sematary.”

Psychedelic Lunch

[Chuck Schuldiner] showed the foresight and courage to not only help create the rules of death metal, but to demonstrate how to break them. — Arthur von Nagel (Cormorant)

Charles Michael “Chuck” Schuldiner(May 13, 1967 – December 13, 2001) was an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist.

He founded the band Death in 1983 and was their lead vocalist until his death in 2001. His obituary in the January 5, 2002 issue of UK’s Kerrang!magazine said that “Chuck Schuldiner was one of the most significant figures in the history of metal.”

Schuldiner is referred to as “The Godfather of death metal”, although he was “uncomfortable” with this nickname, remarking that “I don’t think I should take the credits for this death metal stuff. I’m just a guy from a band, and I think Death is a metal band.”

Eighteen years ago this week, Schuldiner died after a two-year battle with brain cancer. To honor his legacy as a death metal pioneer, an inimitable vocalist and one of the best metal guitarists of all time heres a list of metal musicians writing about their favorite “Death” songs and what Schuldiner has meant to them.

Arthur von Nagel (Cormorant)

  • Zombie Ritual
  • from Scream Bloody Gore
  • by Death

I feel Chuck Schuldiner looked back on his ’80s albums with embarrassment. In interviews he dismissed the words to Scream Bloody Gore as childish blood ‘n’ guts fantasies, and the music as sloppy and poorly performed. He was right: The album’s lyrics are rife with slasher flick violence, misogyny, homophobia, and sexual aggression, traits which clashed with the narrative of self-discovery and acceptance he crafted around his later, more sophisticated works. The music, as exemplified by the pummeling “Zombie Ritual,” is gloriously raw, fast, and primitive (and ridiculously catchy). But for all the song’s Beavis and Butt-head-grade lyrics and flailing rhythms, Schuldiner had penned a powerful mission statement for all future death metal bands to follow. Chuck’s adolescent rage proved infectious, and perhaps in spite of themselves, Death and contemporaries Possessed spawned legions of imitators who solidified and improved upon the genre’s tropes.

But by the release of Human, Schuldiner wasn’t that angry teenager anymore. The most blatant evidence of his philosophical shift was Death’s logo, as Chuck famously cleaned up its cobwebs, mopped its the blood, banished the Reaper and righted the inverted crucifix. Some in the metal underground still view his embrace of progressive values (both musical and social) as a betrayal, a cop-out to political correctness and the same dreaded “artistic maturation” that had claimed Metallica. I can’t speak for Schuldiner’s motives for evolving his sound and image, but he placed himself in a unique historical position by having been one of the earliest codifiers of an orthodox death metal style, and then sacrilegiously expanding that very genre’s vocabulary by integrating elements of jazz fusion and progressive rock. Despite Chuck’s rug sweeping of his pubescent albums, to progress artistically demands a starting point to progress from. I firmly believe that every new Death album was a reaction to the last, and without a song like “Zombie Ritual” there could be no “The Philosopher.” It is precisely Schuldiner’s development as both a person and a musician that makes him so fascinating and divisive. He showed the foresight and courage to not only help create the rules of death metal, but to demonstrate how to break them. And there’s no shame in that.

Stephan Gebédi (Hail Of Bullets)

  • Infernal Death
  • from Scream Bloody Gore
  • by Death

At the age of 15, I got heavily into the tape trading thing. I was about to form my first band (Thanatos) and me and the drummer-to-be in that band were trading tapes with people all over the world. Most of those people were 15-16 years old as well and some of them had also just formed or were about to form bands of their own. Among our pen pals were people like Killjoy (Necrophagia), Ken Owen and Bill Steer (Carcass) and guys from Florida called Kam Lee and Chuck Schuldiner. They had this band called Mantas going, but were about to change their name to Death. We traded demo tapes and live tapes and even recordings of rehearsals. I clearly remember a rather f—- up recording of a song called “Rigor Mortis” done with a microphone and a tape recorder, which was obviously about to die any day now. You could hear the microphone falling over and being put back again … hilarious! But the music itself wasn’t hilarious at all! When their new three-song demo tape arrived in the mail one day, we all knew we were listening to something special; the first power chords of the opening track, “Infernal Death,” sounded so brutal, raw and evil that we stared at each other in disbelief. It was unlike anything we’ve ever heard before. Right there we witnessed the birth of death metal. Death went on and became a more technical band and broadened their horizon. I pretty much like all the albums they’ve made, but the sheer intensity of Scream Bloody Gore, which featured the aforementioned track in its full glory, has never been matched again.

“Death by Metal!”

Matt Harvey (Exhumed)

  • Left to Die
  • from Leprosy
  • by Death

Picking a favourite Death song is pretty tough. When I was first starting to play guitar, I learned the Scream Bloody Gore album from front to back and played along with it religiously. Once I heard Leprosy later that same year (I believe it was 1988, but it may have been early ’89), it was clear that the ante had been upped, not just in terms of Death’s catalog, but for the entire fledgling genre of death metal. I truly believe that Leprosy is the album that ushered in the genre as we recognize it today and as such, may be the most important album in death metal altogether. It was the first album to feature the distinct sonic components of what we now recognize as death metal. From the triggered drum sounds to the technical (especially for the time) minor/harmonic minor riffs, the tremolo picking, tapping parts, marginal presence of the bass guitar in the mix, and somewhat baroque arrangements, Leprosy has everything that defines the genre to this day. Where Scream Bloody Gore got by on attitude and rawness, Leprosy was a brilliant balance of sheer power and revealing detail. I devoured the songs on the record, and within a few weeks was playing along to it in its entirety as well. My favorite song tends to change depending on my mood (or how many beers I’ve had — give me a 12 pack and I’ll swear that “Beyond the Unholy Grave” is the best song ever), but if I had to pick one, I guess it would have to be “Left to Die.”

It is just chock-full of great riffs from beginning to end and features some of Chuck’s most inspired vocals. The opening scream at 0:24 oozes brutality, the seemingly off-the-cuff ejaculation of “On this f—— earth” at 2:04 gives the song a great dash of snarling attitude, and the grunt at 2:54 when the beat turns around personally synthesizes my own transformation from a thrash metaller to a death metal devotee. But there are still more vocal highlights: the scream at 3:13 may be the best death metal vocal ever recorded, surpassing even Jeff Becerra’s scream at the end of Possessed’s song, “Death Metal.” The final touch is the emphasis of the word “death” in the lyrics at 3:30, providing a nice, knowing wink at the audience. Again, the brilliance of this album is as much in its nuance as it is in its brute force.

As with most songs on the record, there are a lot of different riffs and tempos going on, presaging the hyper-ADD style arrangements that would become the norm in the genre in years to come. Luckily for a simple guy like me, the song still has a distinct structure — the same arrangement that figures heavily in most of Chuck’s songs: intro – verse – pre-chorus – chorus – bridge – lead – bridge –verse – pre-chorus – chorus – outro. Of course, some parts feature multiple riffs and time changes, but there is still a very coherent, recognizable structure to cling to in this song. The strangely modal intro riff is a harbinger of the scalar workouts that would figure so heavily in death metal’s transformation from a grime-covered sub-genre to a style obsessed with pushing the limits of instrumental technique, but the verse riff is the one that gets me. It’s a bludgeoning, hulking menace that throws its weight around with no regard for the listeners neck, which should immediately start whiplashing upon hearing it. The tremolo-picked chorus riff is also a bit more dissonant than most Death riffs, leaning heavily on a diminished pattern of D, F, A-flat, (which features prominently in about 99 percent of Exhumed songs) which is why it’s a favorite of mine. Chuck’s lead is, of course, tastefully dark with his trademark nervous vibrato heavily featured throughout, but in this song, I actually prefer the outro solo, a nice parting shot delivered by Rick “Rozz” Delilo, whose frenetic whammy bar abuse keeps the entire album from ever getting too melodic or anywhere near “pretty.” This is a truly great song on a truly classic, groundbreaking album. In fact, I’m almost convinced after writing this that it’s my all-time favorite Death song, but who knows, ask me again next week, and I may come up with 500 words describing why “Mutilation,” “Back from the Dead” or “Forgotten Past” is my favourite.

Paul Masvidal (Cynic)

  • Cosmic Sea
  • from Human
  • by Death

It’s difficult trying to articulate what it is about this instrumental Death song off Human — essentially arranged and written in the studio — that speaks to me. It doesn’t have Chuck’s voice in the literal sense, but it contains all the vital harmonic, melodic and rhythmic components that branded Death’s sound. But it also has something else. It’s reaching for truth, and it holds a majestic beauty that gave Death’s songs their greatest potency. What I’m remembering is the beginner mind approach in which this song took shape in the studio. It was driven by instinct and spontaneous creative freedom. Our collective energies united and we swam into the “Cosmic Sea,” trusting we wouldn’t need a life raft. Chuck’s story was liberated without words. “Cosmic Sea” is a journey straight into the heart of Death and, for me, an auditory memory of what an old friend felt like at his best.

Gene Hoglan (Fear Factory)

  • Flattening of Emotions
  • from Human
  • by Death

“Flattening of Emotions” from Human is an absolute masterpiece. From the “Hot for Teacher”-esque drum intro to the progressive approach of the opening bars of the song to the blistering salvos of double bass that pervade the entire composition, this tune achieves greatness as well as lays down the foundation for every Death song to have followed it. “Flattening of Emotions” is a benchmark, a performance pinnacle and furious mission statement; that death metal will no longer be relegated to mere brute strength, but will evolve past troglodytism into sublime art, where precision and passion will triumph over perfunctory extremism. With “Flattening of Emotions,” Death imposed its will on death metal, and secured its evolution. Death metal was given a choice: Adapt or Die. Adapt it did.

Richard Christy (Charred Walls Of The Damned)

  • Lack of Comprehension
  • from Human
  • by Death

I spent many Saturday nights in grade school and high school watching MTV’s Headbanger’s Ball. I was very fortunate that my parents had one of those old, massive, ugly giant satellite dishes that took up half our front yard and also made a great bird’s nest and lightning rod. Because we had MTV and also Canada’s Much Music channel since the early 1980s, I was able to discover many of my favorite bands through these TV channels, including Death. I remember the first time I saw the video for “Lack of Comprehension” and I was completely blown away. This song was the perfect mix of brutality and melody. Sean Reinert’s drumming also blew my mind. As a drummer, I was fascinated by his playing and I immediately wanted to learn more about Death. I also couldn’t believe that this song had brutal, guttural vocals, but was also very melodic and catchy — to me it sounded like the perfect mix of a band like Iron Maiden, and a band like Possessed. I immediately tried to learn the drum parts for this song and I have to humbly say that it took me about three years to do so.

Almost every day from the time I purchased the Human album in 1992 until I joined Death in 1997, I practiced drums to the Human album because I loved the music and drumming so much. Fortunately, when I auditioned for Death in July of 1997 I knew the Human album like the back of my hand and the first song Chuck Schuldiner and I played together was “Lack of Comprehension.” Chuck was very impressed that I knew the whole Human album and many other Death songs and this led to me joining my favorite band in the world and making friends with the most talented musician I’ve ever met and one of my heroes, Chuck Schuldiner. I miss Chuck so much and think of him every day and pretty much still listen to Death every day. When fans ask what drumming performance of mine that I’m most proud of, I always say The Sound of Perseverance album by Death. It is the highest honor as a metal fan and a dear friend of Chuck’s Schuldiner’s to say that I got to be in Death, my favorite band in the world.

John Dyer Baizley (Baroness)

  • Philosopher
  • from Individual Thought Patterns [Remixed, Remastered, Repackaged & Expanded]
  • by Death

Individual Thought Patterns is the masterpiece Death record for me. It’s the record where songwriting, production, lyrics, musicianship and hooks all converge to form a classic album. I remember being stuck in a tour van on some rural Eastern European road, and someone put the CD in the stereo. You can deny neither the skills nor the cohesion of the players on this record. Each musician is an institution unto himself, and this album goes right where so many sum-of-parts records go wrong. [Guitarist] Andy LaRoque’s surprising inclusion is a true stroke of genius. The real treat is that after an initial listen to such a progressive and technical record, I actually remembered most of the songs, most notably “The Philospher.” This was a death metal song that was instantly stuck in my head.

From the iconic opening guitar arpeggios, to the audible (!) groove of the bass line and one of the heaviest and most memorable choruses in the Death canon, this song hits every nail on the head. The guitar soloing is effortlessly fluid and melodic; and nothing negative ever needs to be said about Gene Hoglan’s acumen behind the kit.

Too often, the best you can hope for in metal lyricism is base comedy and adolescent sloganeering. Chuck stands apart as a lyricist in that he brazenly and unapologetically writes personal and insightful lyrics. While they may adhere to the tried-and-true vocal cadence of his peers, there is an openness and candor to them that is hard to deny. In “The Philosopher” he tackles subjects that fly in the face of the knuckle-dragging-Metal-orthodoxy, as he discusses and condemns narrow-minded bigotry and undue sexual judgementalism. His message, unlike so many of his contemporaries, is a universal and human message of tolerance, unadorned with the ignoble trappings generally associated with the genre.

Kevin Conway (East Of The Wall)

  • Overactive Imagination
  • from Individual Thought Patterns [Remixed, Remastered, Repackaged & Expanded]
  • by Death

As a middle-schooler who was acquainted with only the most obvious and basic metal staples, I had absolutely no frame of reference for what I was hearing the first time I heard Death’s “Overactive Imagination.” The level of technical precision was beyond anything I had ever heard, but the technicality wasn’t the entire story. The songs were structured in a way that was compelling, yet totally natural. It was everything I ever wanted to hear, but never knew existed. I would only get about six years of Death fandom before Chuck’s untimely demise. I would never get to see them live either. In spite of all that, there are very few bands that have shaped me as much as Death did, both as a musician and as a listener.

Elizabeth Schall (Dreaming Dead)

  • Crystal Mountain
  • from Symbolic
  • by Death

Symbolic is by far my most favorite Death album; mainly because of the higher pitched growls and the guitars having a more progressive approach than in previous releases. And 10 years after Chuck Schuldiner’s death, it is easy to say the legacy he left behind continues to influence musicians all over the world. But it wasn’t until the summer of 2009 when my appreciation of this album came full circle, when I met [former Death bassist] Kelly Conlon on tour with Monstrosity. We spoke of many things such as life and music; I shared pictures of my cats and he of his dog back on the East Coast that he missed and loved so much. Death not only left their music and a lasting impression on me, but also a great friend.

Anthony Buda (Revocation)

  • Without Judgement
  • from Symbolic
  • by Death

After first hearing the music of Death in my mid-teens, it didn’t take long for me to identify Chuck Shuldiner as a primary musical and creative role model. Touched by the power, energy and uniqueness of Death’s music in a way that I had never before experienced, it seemed an obvious and foregone conclusion to idolize “Evil” Chuck. And unlike the vast majority of his early death metal peers, Chuck was unafraid to go beyond the lyrical comfort zone of terror and malevolence.

The song “Without Judgment,” from Death’s masterful Symbolic, resonated strongly with me as a teenager not only for its awesome composition, arrangement and performances, but also because the lyrics stimulated my imagination and my desire to understand and integrate with the world around me. In the decade or so since first falling in love with the song, I have realized that its most significant impact has been to plant this seed of desire for understanding: “Without judgment what would we do? / Perception would increase a million times.” By accessing the non-judgmental, integrative awareness of our creative minds, temporarily silencing the persistent self-definition and differentiation of the ego, we gain a sense of the beautiful unity of existence. But, Chuck warns, the path to this level of awareness is not without its pitfalls: The only way out is down: “When pain is acknowledged, frivolous calculations will be abolished.”

Steffen Kummerer (Obscura)

  • Flesh and the Power It Holds
  • from Sound of Perseverance
  • by Death

“Flesh and the Power it Holds” was one of the first tracks I discovered of Death and actually the first song I was able to play on guitar. Pretty good choice, great songwriting and fantastic riffs that itches under your skin. While the whole last album is a classic, the earlier material such as Human got me and since the first listen I have been a fan. “Flesh and the Power it Holds” is a pretty long song, but it never gets boring; it keeps you listening from the first to the last note. Still one of my all time favourites.

11 metal musicians to pick their favorite Death song, and write what Chuck Schuldiner has meant to them

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s and 70’s. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

This was co-written and produced by Artie Kornfeld who later went on to be one of the concert promoters of Woodstock.

This was the breakthrough hit for the family group, The Cowsills, who were the forerunner of The Osmonds, a group that would appear on the same record label a few years later. Unlike the Osmonds, the boys’ mother Barbara also features on the recordings. The Cowsills also made many television appearances during the late 1960s and the early 1970s and they were an inspiration for the Partridge Family.

This song is known to many as “The Flower Girl.” Studio musicians were brought in for the recording, a practice that continued until 1969, when the Cowsill family were allowed to play their own musical instruments.

This reached #1 in Canada in the week of November 13, 1967.

A British rock group, Vanity Fare, poked fun at the Cowsills by naming their 1968 album The Sun, the Wind, and Other Things.After the success of this single, two more Cowsill siblings – Paul and Susan – joined the group. In 1968 they had an American #10 hit with “Indian Lake.”

Susan Cowsill had just had her ninth birthday when this reached the Top 10, making her the youngest rock performer to have a Top 10 hit in America.

Olivia Newton-John recorded an upbeat version of this song for the 2011 movie soundtrack A Few Best Men. The soundtrack album is all cover songs recorded by Newton-John and mixed by various producers.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s and 70’s. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

“You’re Gonna Miss Me” is a song by the American psychedelic rock band the 13th Floor Elevators, written by Roky Erickson, and released as the group’s debut single on Contact Records, on January 17, 1966. It was reissued nationally on International Artists, in May 1966. Musically inspired by traditional jug band and R&B music, combined with the group’s own experimentation, “You’re Gonna Miss Me”, along with its Stacy Sutherland and Tommy Hall-penned B-side, “Tried to Hide”, was influential in developing psychedelic rock and garage rock, and was one of the earliest rock compositions to utilize the electric jug. Accordingly, critics often cite “You’re Gonna Miss Me” as a bona fide garage rock song, as well as a classic of the counterculture era.

“You’re Gonna Miss Me” reached number 55 on the Billboard Hot 100, making it the 13th Floor Elevators’ only single to chart nationally. The failure of the song to achieve a higher chart listing is attributed to poor distribution by a disestablished record label. In addition, the band was prevented from consistently touring during their parolefor possession of marijuana. The song was also included as a track on their debut album, The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators, in November 1966.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s and 70’s. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Roger Waters wrote the lyrics. While many people thought the song was about drugs, Waters claims it is not. The lyrics are about what he felt like as a child when he was sick with a fever. As an adult, he got that feeling again sometimes, entering a state of delirium, where he felt detached from reality. He told Mojomagazine (December 2009) that the lines, “When I was a child I had a fever/My hands felt just like two balloons” were autobiographical. He explained: “I remember having the flu or something, an infection with a temperature of 105 and being delirious. It wasn’t like the hands looked like balloons, but they looked way too big, frightening. A lot of people think those lines are about masturbation. God knows why.”

In a radio interview around 1980 with Jim Ladd from KLOS in Los Angeles, Waters said part of the song is about the time he got hepatitis but didn’t know it. Pink Floyd had to do a show that night in Philadelphia, and the doctor Roger saw gave him a sedative to help the pain, thinking it was a stomach disorder. At the show, Roger’s hands were numb “like two toy balloons.” He was unable to focus, but also realized the fans didn’t care because they were so busy screaming, hence “comfortably” numb. He said most of The Wall is about alienation between the audience and band.

Exploring further, Mojo asked Waters about the line, “That’ll keep you going through the show,” referring to getting medicated before going on-stage. He explained: “That comes from a specific show at the Spectrum in Philadelphia (June 29, 1977). I had stomach cramps so bad that I thought I wasn’t able to go on. A doctor backstage gave me a shot of something that I swear to God would have killed a f—ing elephant. I did the whole show hardly able to raise my hand above my knee. He said it was a muscular relaxant. But it rendered me almost insensible. It was so bad that at the end of the show, the audience was baying for more. I couldn’t do it. They did the encore about me.”

Dave Gilmour wrote the music while he was working on a solo album in 1978. He brought it to The Wallsessions and Waters wrote lyrics for it.

Gilmour believes this song can be divided into two sections: dark and light. The light are the parts that begin “When I was a child…,” which Gilmour sings. The dark are the “Hello, is there anybody in there” parts, which are sung by Waters.

Waters and Gilmour had an argument over which version of this to use on the album. They ended up editing two takes together as a compromise. Dave Gilmour said in Guitar World February 1993: “Well, there were two recordings of that, which me and Roger argued about. I’d written it when I was doing my first solo album [David Gilmour, 1978]. We changed the key of the song’s opening the E to B, I think. The verse stayed exactly the same. Then we had to add a little bit, because Roger wanted to do the line, ‘I have become comfortably numb.’ Other than that, it was very, very simple to write. But the arguments on it were about how it should be mixed and which track we should use. We’d done one track with Nick Mason an drums that I thought was too rough and sloppy. We had another go at it and I thought that the second take was better. Roger disagreed. It was more an ego thing than anything else. We really went head to head with each other over such a minor thing. I probably couldn’t tell the difference if you put both versions on a record today. But, anyway, it wound up with us taking a fill out of one version and putting it into another version.”This was the last song Waters and Gilmour wrote together. In 1986 Waters left the band and felt there should be no Pink Floyd without him.

When they played this on The Wall tour, a 35-foot wall was erected between the band and the audience as part of the show. As the wall went up, Gilmour was raised above it on a hydraulic lift to perform the guitar solo while Waters was spotlighted in front of the wall below. It was Gilmour’s favorite part of the show.

In the movie The Wall, this plays in a scene where the main character, a rock star named “Pink,” loses his mind and enters a catatonic state before a show. It was similar to what Syd Barrett, an original member of the band, went through in 1968 when he became mentally ill and was kicked out of the band.

This song is the final step in Pink’s (Roger Water’s) transformation into the Neo-Nazi, fascist character you see in the movie The Wall. Medics and the band manager come in and give Pink a shot to pull him out of his catatonic stupor, the manager pays protesting Meds some cash to shut up and let him take Pink to the concert in the state he’s in (obviously a threat to his health, but the Meds, who probably don’t make enough money, accept). In the movie Pink begins to melt on the way there, and underneath he finds that he is the cruel, fascist model of a Nazi party representative by the time he arrives at the concert. Supporting this, afterwards are the songs “The Show Must Go On” (Pink realizing as he gets to the show that there isn’t really any turning back, and he’s forced to go on-stage), “In the Flesh II” (the redone version of the first song on the album, now with Nazi-Pink singing, threatening random minorities), and “Run Like Hell” (after the crowd, loving nazi-Pink, has been whipped into a frenzy, now hunting minorities in the street, much like late 1930 Germany). While it does seem that this is a song about the “joy of heroin,” it has little, if any connection to heroin even if it’s condition resembles that of somebody who’s totally wasted.

David Gilmour played this on his 2006 solo tour, where he was joined by Pink Floyd keyboard player Rick Wright.

Van Morrison played this with Roger Waters at a 1990 concert Waters organized in Berlin to commemorate the fall of the Berlin Wall. This version was used in the movie The Departed and also appeared in an episode of The Simpsons.

Gilmour’s second guitar solo on “Comfortably Numb” regularly appears in Best Guitar Solo of All Time polls. In an August 2006 poll by viewers of TV music channel Planet Rock it was voted the greatest guitar solo of all time. For the solo, the Pink Floyd guitarist used a heavy pick on his Fender Strat with maple neck through a Big Muff and delay via a Hiwatt amp and a Yamaha RA-200 rotating speaker cabinet. Gilmour told Guitar World that the solo didn’t take long to develop: “I just went out into the studio and banged out 5 or 6 solos. From there I just followed my usual procedure, which is to listen back to each solo and mark out bar lines, saying which bits are good. In other words, I make a chart, putting ticks and crosses on different bars as I count through: two ticks if it’s really good, one tick if it’s good and cross if it’s no go. Then I just follow the chart, whipping one fader up, then another fader, jumping from phrase to phrase and trying to make a really nice solo all the way through. That’s the way we did it on ‘Comfortably Numb.’ It wasn’t that difficult. But sometimes you find yourself jumping from one note to another in an impossible way. Then you have to go to another place and find a transition that sounds more natural.”

Psychedelic Lunch