Super Metal World recently conducted an interview with frontwoman Tatiana Shmailyuk of Ukrainian modern metal frontrunners JINJER. You can listen to the entire chat at this location.

On the reaction to their new studio album, “Macro”:

Tatiana: “So far, I haven’t yet heard any negative reactions to the album, so, that’s good. I’m not the one who is surfing the Internet in search of comments and reactions. I don’t care what people think because I have a lot of things to do. I don’t know…so far so good. Again, I haven’t heard shitty responses to the album.”

On the songwriting approach to “Macro”:

Tatiana: “I don’t take part in composing music. Everything I do I’m just writing lyrics and trying to feed them into already-written material. I don’t take part in composing it and they, the rest of the guys, write music at their home and they don’t even ask me about my opinion about the material.”

On whether “Pisces” was the song that broke JINJERinto the mainstream:

Tatiana: “Unfortunately, ‘Pisces’ lost its charm. It became viral, which I don’t like. I don’t like the huge hype that we’re having right now. It wasn’t supposed to be like this. This song is very personal and believe me, Pisces are not those people who are begging for our attention. I don’t like this word, ‘mainstream.’ The people made it mainstream; we didn’t. We didn’t really want it to be like this. But nevertheless, on the other hand, it’s really good. It’s really good that this song is so much appreciated.”

On whether she feels “jaded” about JINJER‘s recent popularity:

Tatiana: “The only thing I can say about that, [is] me personally, I feel under the pressure. I feel the pressure a bit, but, I’m sure that people are going to say, ‘Okay, but this is what you wanted, so don’t complain.’ And I will say that when I dreamt about being a singer in a band, I was 11, and believe me, I had no idea that musicians had their own reality to face. I had no idea. And I didn’t read any articles or didn’t watch any interviews because, first of all, I didn’t have any Internet connection on my computer. I imagined it to be a fucking fairytale. [Laughs] Obviously it’s not like that. I didn’t know that I had to do so many interviews. [Laughs] I feel like being a musician in the 21st century is a completely different thing than being a musician in the 20th century in the ’90s, for example, and the ’70s and ’80s. So, I probably cannot compare because I never lived in those times.”

On whether she still gets joy out of being in JINJER:

Tatiana: “Yeah, of course. Of course. Sometimes your exhaustion or your tiredness is so overwhelming that you kind of stop seeing those beautiful things every day. You have to always be focused. I have to be focused all the time on the good which is a really hard thing for me. [Laughs] But I’m trying to be grateful and trying to learn.”

On whether her rough Ukrainian upbringing has any effect on her perspective on the music industry:

Tatiana: “No. I think I was born like this. I believe that, well, a lot of people think that you can shift energies from negative to positive. I think, to my mind, people are born with a certain kind of energy. Someone was born sad and someone was born, I don’t know, very happy and positive and no matter what happens in their life, they are always positive. They don’t even have to make any effort to stay positive. This is genuine energy. And someone is seeing everything in black and white. It’s really hard.”

On whether she’s an introvert:

Tatiana: “Yes. Two-hundred percent introverted. [Laughs] It’s not bad, and again, I analyze myself all the time. Sometimes people make me think I’m kind of retarded or handicapped being an introvert. A lot of people don’t even know that there is a term ‘extrovert’ and ‘introvert.’ They think that those shy people, there is something wrong with them, but hell no, I remember once in my childhood, I was very extroverted, but then something clicked in my head. When I was dancing, like in a circle of our relatives at parties, holidays, then something clicked in my head and I started avoiding people. When our relatives came to celebrate some holiday, I was hiding under my bed because there were very crazy dudes. Like not really my uncle, he’s not my relative, there’s not blood relationships, and he was really loud. [Laughs] And I was hiding from him. I was hiding under my bed so that he didn’t disturb me.”

“Macro” was released on October 25 via Napalm Records. Punishing riffs, aggressively blended vocals and astonishingly deep lyrics make “Macro” JINJER‘s most advanced and undeniable album yet — taking the listener on a journey of trauma, power struggle and greed with a progressive groove metal backdrop. 

JINJER’s TATIANA SHMAILYUK: ‘I Don’t Like The Huge Hype We’re Having Right Now’

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s and 70’s. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Canned Heat – “Going Up The Country”

Canned Heat’s band members were notoriously avid record collectors; this was derived from an old and obscure Blues song called “Bull Doze Blues” by Henry Thomas. The song caught on in the summer of 1969 and was very popular among Hippies who appreciated the nature theme.

This was written by Alan Wilson, who was Canned Heat’s vocalist, guitarist and primary songwriter. Wilson committed suicide on September 3, 1970, becoming one of the first 27-year-old rock casualties, a group that would soon include Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison.

Canned Heat played this at Day 2 of the Woodstock festival, which was a big moment for the band. The song was kind of an anthem for the festival, as “Going Up the Country” described the pilgrimage to Yasgur’s farm in upstate New York where the event took place. The band didn’t put much effort into practicing for their appearance, and their 10 song set was uneven – their co-founder Bob Hite said in a 1974 Sounds interview, “We’ve always just fallen into something within a couple of days and then just gone out on the road and played. Sometimes it’s shown it and sometimes it’s been incredible. The Woodstock performance which although there were a couple of tunes which weren’t too good, ‘Going Up The Country’ was one of them.”

The song was included on the Woodstock album, but Canned Heat’s set was edited out of the official movie. It can be seen on the director’s cut of the film.

Bob Hite sang lead on most Canned Heat songs, but this one was sung by Alan Wilson in his distinctive tenor.

The prominent flute in this song was played by Jim Horn, who made his biggest impact as a saxophone player, appearing on tracks by The Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney and The Beach Boys.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s and 70’s. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Traffic Band Circa May 1969

“Dear Mr. Fantasy” is the final track on Side 1 of Traffic’s debut album. Running at 5 minutes and 44 seconds, it’s the longest track on the album. The sound is moody and atmospheric, bordering on eerie.

Traffic member Jim Capaldi wrote the lyrics. Bandmates Steve Windwood and Chris Wood wrote the music. Lyrically, the song is a simple sketch of a tortured artist who sacrifices his own happiness to make the audience happy. That’s how it appears, anyway. Some lines, though, are loaded with subtext.

“Do anything, take us out of this gloom” implies that the audience lives in a perpetual, or at least persistent, state of unhappiness. Whether that was an observation of the era, of the permanent human condition, or just a random choice of words, isn’t clear.

“Sing a song, play guitar, make it snappy” suggests some level of maliciousness in the audience’s demands on the artist. They’re ordering him around like a servant, compounding his apparent misery. It creates the impression that he’s a slave to his listeners.

Despite the interesting subtleties in the lyrics, the song’s haunting, mysterious power comes primarily from the foggy music itself – as well as, perhaps, from less earthly places.

Like the rest of the album, “Dear Mr. Fantasy” was written in a cottage on a 19th-century Berkshire farm named Sheepcot Farm, outside of London. The actual recording took place in Olympic Studios in London, but the creative process all went down in the relatively remote Sheepcot location, where the band took up residence on April 1, 1967. A champion jockey and horse-breeder named Sir William Pigott-Brown rented it to them.

In describing the farm in his piece “Fantasy and Reality,” Kris Needs (Shindig, March 2017) wrote, “Stables and out-buildings had long since rotted away, leaving only The Cottage, a two-story stucco building hidden from the road by trees and bushes, with huge fields of barley sweeping behind it into the distance… A large cement platform in front of the house served as a stage on which the band could jam through the spring and summer nights, illuminated by a vivid liquid light show projected onto the front of the building.”

The countryside surrounding enhanced the aura of ancientness and mystery. Prehistoric tribes had once farmed the land and filled it with religious monuments and earthworks. A Celtic chalk drawing from 20 BC named the White Horse of Uffington was located nearby, as was Uffington Castle, Dragon Hill, Roman Hill, and many other locations stretching way back into early English folklore.

In the book that comes with Chris Wood’s box set Evening Blue, Windwood wrote, “We all felt there was some mystery in the landscape and we wanted to see if we could get the same mystery into Traffic’s music and somehow be influenced by that mystery. We didn’t really know how, but we were influenced by that mystery.”

Not all the mysterious forces in the Cottage were benevolent, though, and not everyone remembered them fondly. When the band dissolved a couple years after Mr. Fantasy, Capaldi said, “There was something evil in that cottage.” He blamed it, in part, for the breaking up of the band.

Capaldi recalled the exact moment that spawned “Dear Mr. Fantasy.”

One early morning at the Cottage he was coming down off LSD, sketching in front of a log fire. Bubbling out of his acid-fired subconsciousness and through his pencil came a the image of a man hanging on puppet strings and wearing a spiked hat with the words, “Dear Mr. Fantasy, play us a tune, something to make us all happy” scrawled under him.

Wood found Capaldi’s sketch and set a bass line to it. That evening they drove into the city and recorded the song at Olympic Studios. They burned incense in the recording room and turned the lights low to capture the mood the song had been borne from.

During recording, producer Jimmy Miller was so excited by what he heard that he jumped into the room playing maracas, eagerly driving the band on. It’s the only instrumental credit he has on the album.

During a show at the London Saville theater in 1967, Wood dedicated this song to Frank Zappa. (Keith Altham, New Musical Express, September 30, 1967)

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s and 70’s. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Bob Dylan poses for a portrait with his Gibson acoustic guitar in September 1961 in New York City

Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Bob Dylan – The Times They Are A-Changin, a call to action, “The Times They Are A-Changin'” became an anthem for frustrated youth. It summed up the anti-establishment feelings of people who would later be known as hippies. Many of the lyrics are based on the Civil Rights movement in the US.

In the liner notes of this album Biograph, Dylan wrote: “I wanted to write a big song, some kind of theme song, with short, concise verses that piled up on each other in a hypnotic way. This is definitely a song with a purpose. I knew exactly what I wanted to say and who I wanted to say it to.”

Dylan recorded this song in October 1963. He first performed the song at a Carnegie Hall concert on October 26 that year, using it as his opening number.

On November 22, 1963, United States president John F. Kennedy was assassinated, which made this song even more poignant. This also presented a quandary for Dylan, who had to decide if he would keep playing the song; he found it odd when audiences would erupt in applause after hearing it, and wondered exactly what they were clapping for.

Dylan kept the song in his sets. It was issued on the album of the same name on January 13, 1964.

Dylan covered the Carter Family Song “Wayworn Traveler,” writing his own words to the melody and named it “Paths Of Victory”. This recording is featured on “Bootleg Series Vol. 1-3”. After writing that song, he re-wrote the words again, changed the time signature to 3/4, and created this, one of his most famous songs ever.

This was released as a single in England in 1965 before Dylan went there to tour. When this hit in England, Dylan’s second album, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, went to #1 on the UK charts. It was the first time in two years that an album by a group other that The Beatles or Rolling Stones was #1.

Dylan allowed this to be used in commercials for accounting firm Coopers and Lybrand in the ’90s. In 1996, he also licensed it for commercial use by the Bank of Montreal.

Handwritten lyrics to four verses of this song jotted on a scrap of paper by Dylan were sold for $422,500 at a December 10, 2010 sale. Hedge fund manager and contemporary art collector Adam Sender placed the winning bid by phone to Sothebys in New York.

This song appears on the official soundtrack of the 2009 movie Watchmen. A cover of Dylan’s “Desolation Row” by My Chemical Romance also appears on the soundtrack.

Simon & Garfunkel covered this on their first album, Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M., in 1964. They were produced at the time by Tom Wilson, who also produced Dylan’s The Times They Are A-Changin’ album.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s and 70’s. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Buffalo Springfield

Buffalo Springfield – For What Its Worth written by Buffalo Springfield guitarist Stephen Stills, this song was not about anti-war gatherings, but rather youth gatherings protesting anti-loitering laws, and the closing of the West Hollywood nightclub Pandora’s Box. Stills was not there when they closed the club, but had heard about it from his bandmates.

In the book Neil Young: Long May You Run: The Illustrated History, Stephen Stills tells the story of this song’s origin: “I had something kicking around in my head. I wanted to write something about the kids that were on the line over in Southeast Asia that didn’t have anything to do with the device of this mission, which was unraveling before our eyes. Then we came down to Sunset from my place on Topanga with a guy – I can’t remember his name – and there’s a funeral for a bar, one of the favorite spots for high school and UCLA kids to go and dance and listen to music.

[Officials] decided to call out the official riot police because there’s three thousand kids sort of standing out in the street; there’s no looting, there’s no nothing. It’s everybody having a hang to close this bar. A whole company of black and white LAPD in full Macedonian battle array in shields and helmets and all that, and they’re lined up across the street, and I just went ‘Whoa! Why are they doing this?’ There was no reason for it. I went back to Topanga, and that other song turned into ‘For What It’s Worth,’ and it took as long to write as it took me to settle on the changes and write the lyrics down. It all came as a piece, and it took about fifteen minutes.”

Buffalo Springfield was the band’s first album, and this song was not originally included on it. After “For What It’s Worth” became a hit single, it replaced “Baby Don’t Scold Me” on re-issues of the album.

Notable when you consider this song’s success, the group quietly recorded this without involving their producers Charles Greene and Brian Stone, with whom they had had immense dissatisfaction about the recording of their album up until then. Greene and Stone had insisted on recording each musician separately and then combining them later into mono to stereo tracks, which produced a tinny sound. This was the first time the group’s united performance was caught on tape. (Thanks to Dwight Rounds for his help with this. Dwight is author of The Year The Music Died, 1964-1972.)

This was used in a commercial for Miller beer. The antiestablishment message was, of course, ignored and the song was edited to avoid the line “There’s a man with a gun over there, telling you you’ve got to beware.” The commercial replaced this line by pulling up the chorus of “Everybody look what’s going down.”Songwriting powerhouses Jim Messina and Neil Young were also in Buffalo Springfield, but Stills wrote this song himself. Young has never allowed his songs to be used in commercials, and wrote a song bashing those who do called “This Note’s For You.”

This song helped launch the band to stardom and has remained one of the era’s most enduring protest songs, but Stephen Stills, who authored the tune, had very different feelings than many might expect. He said, “We didn’t want to do another song like ‘For What It’s Worth.’ We didn’t want to be a protest group. That’s really a cop-out and I hate that. To sit there and say, ‘I don’t like this and I don’t like that’ is just stupid.”

Public Enemy sampled this on their 1998 song “He Got Game,” which was used in the movie of the same name. Stephen Stills appears on this song.

This song gets covered a lot – for a weird experience, check out the cover versions of “For What It’s Worth” done by Ozzy Osbourne on the Under Cover album and Queensryche on their Take Cover album. Both of them pretty much murder it.

This song plays during the opening credits of the movie Lord Of War starring Nicolas Cage, and was used in the movie Forrest Gump starring Tom Hanks.

Psychedelic Lunch

L-R: Morgan Rider [Vocals, Guitar, Piano, Percussion], Nathen Morrison [Cello]

Canada’s Morgan Rider & The Deep Dark River will be releasing their new album and the second installment in The Deep Dark River quadrilogy saga – “Leviathan and The Deep Dark Blue”.

The first chapter “King of The Forest” (North Soul Records) this past June and now “Leviathan and The Deep Dark Blue” (North Soul Records) is ready to be experienced by listeners this coming November 22nd. Releasing their first single is The Seafaerers’ at the beginning of October. The band is ready to share their next track in support of the release with an acoustic video of Morgan Rider performing ‘The Immeasurable Fathoms’, which can be viewed HERE.

Rider adds:

“I’m very happy to finally release a solo live version of some of the music from our new album ‘Leviathan and The Deep Dark Blue’. This is how I wrote and developed all the music for the album, so it’s cool to show it off in this stripped-down version, without all the heavy guitars, bass and drums.”

Morgan Rider and The Deep Dark Rivercombine all the humble qualities of blues, folk and classical into a well-balanced, artfully crafted musical reflection on life, hope and old-fashioned storytelling while delivering a uniquely fresh and uplifting listening experience.

Album pre-order and stream of the band’s first single The Seafaerers’ here.

Track Listing: 
1 – Beneath The Crushing Tides (2:12)
2 – The Immeasurable Fathoms (6:35)
3 – Dread (4:38)
4 – Ignite The Tempests (5:01)
5 – The Seafaerers (4:50)
6 – When The Waves Are Stilled (7:15)
7 – Where the Light May Never Reach (2:53)
8 – The Immeasurable Fathoms (Acoustic) (4:59)
9 – Dread (Acoustic) (4:00)
10 – Ignite The Tempests (Acoustic) (5:33)
11 – The Seafaerers (Acoustic) (5:02)
12 – When The Waves Are Stilled (Acoustic) (5:28)
Album Length: 58:31

Tour Dates:
11.15 – Bowmanville, ON – Manantler Craft Brewing
11.10 – Bowmanville, ON – Chronicle Brewing Co.
11.16 – Huntsville, ON – Huntsville Alehouse
11.21 – Kingston, ON – Musiikki
11.22 – Lindsay, ON – Boiling Over’s
12.06 – Bowmanville, ON – Copperwork’s Brew Pub
12.07 – Bracebridge, ON – Kellys Kitchen 
12.08 – Ottawa, ON – Bar Robo (Chinatown)
12.14 – Toronto, ON – Friday Roots
12.27 – Perth, ON – Fiddleheads
12.28 – Toronto, ON – Cherry Cola’s (LEVIATHAN ALBUM RELEASE PARTY)
01.25 – Campellford, ON – That Little Pub 
02.01 – Belleville, ON – The Beaufort Pub

For more info: 
Morganridermusic.com
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Twitter
Instagram

About:Born in 1989, singer, songsmith and multi-instrumentalist Morgan Rider had his earliest imaginings of life as a musician while contending with an often tumultuous childhood. Overhearing his mother – who is a trained operatic soprano – his love and understanding of music blossomed at an early age. Morgan eventually spending his adolescent and early adult years performing in touring metal bands – appearing on tours and large festivals across North America and Europe.

During the summer of 2017, Morgan’s adoration of folk, classical and blues music finally culminated into a project and the beginnings of a collection of songs. The name Deep Dark River had been stuck in his head for years, as a byproduct of his writings and alluding to the very nature of his ideas as a musician and artist. As such, Deep Dark River became the name by which he would perform beneath.

While his ideas began to take form, so did his mindset for what became the early stages of Deep Dark River. In March of 2018, the first original Deep Dark River single ‘The Golden Bough’ was released digitally worldwide. Morgan began performing live and also toured solo to the Canadian east coast to promote the single. In the summer of 2018, the debut album Deep Dark River was released and supported with a full Canadian solo tour over 5 weeks.

As 2018 neared its end, Morgan called upon his friend Nathen Morrison to contribute cello to the sounds of Deep Dark River, solidifying the project as a duo. The pair immediately began rehearsing and recording the first of a four-album quadrilogy – which Morgan had written the bulk of on his travels. The first single featuring the pair – Starfire – was released in March of 2019 along with the album “King of The Forest” released on June 21st, 2019 via North Soul Records. Not slowing down, the pair have their next album just months later “The Deep Dark Blue” planned for release via North Soul Records on November 22nd, 2019 with its lead single ‘The Seafaerers’.

MORGAN RIDER (Vesperia) & THE DEEP DARK RIVER Share Acoustic Video ‘The Immeasurable Fathoms’ New Album “Leviathan and The Deep Dark Blue” Out November 22nd

Exploding from the darkness of the underground come Inverted Matter, a potent new force in death metal with a debut album of shocking intensity and monstrous power. Detach features nine finely crafted songs that bind together furious brutality, crushing heaviness, absorbing atmosphere and vicious, unforgettable hooks. This album will leave you dazed and disturbed, with the taste of death in your mouth.

More than just another new band on the scene, Inverted Matter are driven by the soul-shaking drum onslaught of Michael Smith, a true death metal legend. Smith provided the genre defining blasts behind Suffocation’s masterpieces Human WasteEffigy Of The ForgottenBreeding The SpawnSouls To Deny and more. His unmistakeable beats now thunder beneath the staggering riffs, wicked solos and imperious vocals that characterise the superb songs that form Detach. Ruthlessly injecting their rampant creativity with the genetic matter of classic Morbid AngelImmolation and Suffocation, Inverted Matter have created a monster that is driven to dominate and destroy.

When Lethal Scissor Records’ tireless search through the catacombs of the underground uncovered this slumbering beast, they knew they had found something beautifully twisted and infinitely dangerous. Prepare to welcome your new overlords and let the killing begin!

For more information on Inverted Matter click here
Visit Inverted Matter on Facebook
Visit Lethal Scissor Records here

Inverted Matter, featuring Mike Smith (Suffocation), unleash their massive death metal debut, Detach, on Lethal Scissor Records