Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “The Women Of Rock Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Joan Jett

  • Many of her commercial successes came from covers of songs originally recorded with male voices: The Arrows’ “I Love Rock And Roll,” Tommy James and the Shondells’ “Crimson And Clover,” Gary Glitter’s “Do You Wanna Touch Me,” and AC/DC’s “Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap.”

    The songs she most identifies with, however, are the ones she wrote herself, especially “Bad Reputation.”
  • Her teacher once threw her out of her voice lessons. The teacher was an opera singer who didn’t like the way Jett was dressed.
  • She is a huge fan of the New York Liberty of the WNBA, and can often be seen sitting courtside at their games.
  • She began as a member of the all-girl rock group, The Runaways. Future heavy metal queen Lita Ford was a band mate.
  • Jett starred in the movie The Light of Day with Michael J. Fox. She also appeared in the stage version of The Rocky Horror Picture Show with a bald head, and acted in a movie about the Runaways called We’re All Crazy Now, with actresses playing the other band members. It was never released.
  • In 1979, she released two songs in Holland that she had recorded with ex-Sex Pistols Paul Cook and Steve Jones.
  • Her first album features Blondie members Clem Snide and Frank Infante. It was originally titled Joan Jett, but the record label (Boardwalk) renamed it Bad Reputation.
  • Jett produced many of her own recordings and has done production work for others. Her credits include the Peaches track “I Don’t Give A…” and the Bikini Kill song “Rebel Girl.”
  • She was a staunch supporter of the politician Howard Dean, the governor of Vermont from 1991-2003. When Dean ran for President in 2004, Jett accompanied him to the Iowa caucus, where in his speech to supporters, the candidate let forth a scream of excitement that came off as un-presidential. The media seized the moment, and Dean’s campaign was doomed. Jett was onstage at the time – she says the media got it all wrong; the scream was not angry but effervescent.
  • Ricky Byrd, lead guitarist for the Blackhearts, knows the importance of style. In the book MTV Ruled the World – The Early Years of Music Video, when asked if he thought fashion was important to a band’s success, he answers: “Oh come on, man, it led everything. Billy Idol was great with videos. People would see them and start dressing like him. Look at Madonna. Would Madonna be so big if video wasn’t around, so people could see what she does? If you were a kid, and you just heard one of those songs on the radio, would you be as impressed as if you saw her rolling around on the floor? Shock value is hard to put across on the radio, unless you’re Jim Morrison or something like that… if it’s just outward sex appeal that’s in the words.”
  • Her birth name is Joan Larkin, but she legally changed it in the early ’80s. She came up with the “Jett” moniker after hanging out at a Sunset Strip club called Rodney Bingenheimer’s English Disco, where all the fabulous people used outlandish names.
  • She became one of the first female artists to found her own record label when she and producer/songwriter Kenny Laguna launched Blackheart Records in 1980. Aside from releasing Joan Jett & The Blackhearts albums, the label also helmed releases by hip-hop artists Big Daddy Kane and Professor Griff, and punk acts like The Eyeliners and The Dollyrots.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “The Women Of Rock Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Janis Joplin

  • Joplin was found dead in room 105 of the Landmark Hotel in Los Angeles after a heroin overdose. The hotel was later renamed The Highland Gardens.
  • She left $1500 in her will for a funeral party. It was held at The Lion’s Share in San Anselmo, California, on October 26, 1971. The Grateful Dead performed.
  • She was on the cover of Newsweek May 26, 1969 with the headline, “Rebirth of the Blues.” She was slated for the cover in April, but got bumped when former president Dwight Eisenhower died.
  • Her idol was the blues singer Bessie Smith. When Joplin found out Smith was buried in an unmarked grave, she bought a headstone that read, “The greatest Blues singer in the world will never stop singing.”
  • The 1979 movie The Rose, starring Bette Midler, was based on Joplin’s life.
  • In 1963, she was voted “The Ugliest Man on Campus” at the University of Texas, Austin. This prompted her to leave her home state of Texas and go to San Francisco.
  • She was going to be married in 1966, but backed out to join Big Brother and the Holding Company. Other dating exploits include going to a barbecue with the future United States Secretary of Education William J. Bennett and hitting Doors frontman Jim Morrison over the head with a broken bottle when he tried to pick her up.
  • Joplin appeared in many movies, mostly because of her music. These include Janis, Woodstock, Festival Expressand Petulia (starring George C. Scott and the Grateful Dead).
  • Love, Janis is a biography of her written by her sister Laura, who is also a psychotherapist.
  • She played with many bands over her career. She started with Big Brother, and then used the Joplinaires, the Kozmic Blues Band, and the Full Tilt Boogie Band as backing groups.
  • She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995 – the same year as Led Zeppelin, the Allman Brothers Band, Frank Zappa, Al Green, Martha and the Vandellas, and Neil Young.
  • Her ashes were scattered off the coast of California.
  • Joplin: “Being an intellectual creates a lot of questions and no answers. You can fill your life up with ideas and still go home lonely. All you really have that really matters are feelings. That’s what music is to me.”
  • In 1967, one of Janis’ lovers was Joe McDonald, of Country Joe and the Fish. They were reportedly quite happy together; they would typically lie together in their apartment and crank up the radio whenever either a Country Joe or a Big Brother (Janis’ band) song would come on. Janis joked that for a while their bands merged into “Country Brother and the Holding Fish.” They broke up very amicably, parting more for their careers than anything else.
  • Probably one of the greatest tragedies that shaped Janis’ worldview and hence life was her having been born and raised in the small oil town of Port Arthur, Texas. Many times she would refer to the relentless bullying she’d been a victim of in that most conservative of US states. She spent most of her adult life seeking the approval and acceptance she’d never found in school. In 1969, just after a September concert at the Hollywood Bowl, she played for a packed audience in Austin, Texas, in October. Of the audience described in the papers as “frantically enthusiastic,” she remarked afterwards “I used to go to school here and they never treated me like this!”
  • Janis’s father Seth Joplin was an engineer at a Texas plant in Port Arthur. Both he and Dorothy East, his wife and Janis’s mother, wanted their daughter to become a schoolteacher.
  • Producer John Simon recalls that Janis Joplin would methodically practice various kinds of shrieks and screams which, of course, were made to seem like spontaneous, instinctive explosions of emotion in concert. “She’d go, ‘How about this scream?’ She’d say, ‘Tina Turner does this,’ or ‘Mama Thornton does it this way.'”

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “The Women Of Rock Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Hail The Queens

Rock ‘n roll wouldn’t be the same without these women. It was a world dominated by men but these queens didn’t just break into mainstream and become household names, they also paved the way for other females to pursue their passion in music and be just as badass as their male counterparts.

The following rockers helped change and shape the sound of rock. From their vocals and style to their songwriting, their contribution to rock is invaluable.

Ann & Nancy Wilson of Heart

Heart first found success when its members moved to Canada, in part to avoid the draft, then later in the United States, and ultimately worldwide. Heart rose to fame in the mid-1970s with music influenced by hard rock and heavy metal, as well as folk music. Their popularity declined in the early 1980s; but in 1985, Heart launched a successful comeback which continued into the 1990s, releasing numerous hard-rock songs and ballads. Heart disbanded in 1998, then resumed performing in 2002. In the summer of 2019, Heart ended their 2016 acrimonious break-up by launching their “Love Alive” tour. Iconic hits include “Crazy on You” (1976), “Magic Man” (1976), and “Barracuda” (1977).

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Earache My Eye By Cheech & Chong. Album: Cheech & Chong’s Wedding Album (1974)

“Earache My Eye” is a novelty song and radio comedy skit rolled into one. In spite of not being a “serious” song at all, it not only charted but was Cheech (Marin) and (Tommy) Chong’s only Top-10 hit. They did break the Top-40 with two other works, as well.

While the piece is “featuring Alice Bowie,” this is merely a character created by Cheech Marin. While the comedy duo wrote the lyrics, self-taught guitarist Gaye Delorme set the piece to music and also supplied the guitar riff, while percussionist Airto Moreira supplied the drum-work. Cheech is indeed singing the vocals, although they lip-synch to the track during its appearances, such as in their first film Up In Smoke.

This is often cited as one of the most popular novelty songs of all time, becoming a mainstay of the Doctor Demento program. It also got heavy airplay on the influential Chicago radio station WLS 890 AM. WLS has an interesting history all its own; it was started by the Sears-Roebuck company back in the 1920s and then sold off, and it has a history of mixing comedy and music formats – such as adding farm animal sound effects to John Denver’s “Thank God I’m a Country Boy.”

This song owes a lot of its popularity to sounding awesome and yet also being such a dead-on parody of rock in the 1970s. “I only know three chords!” sums up a lot of rock music, especially in the ’70s. The line “The world’s coming to an end; I don’t even care,” echoes the sentiment of the ’70s “Me Generation” which turned from the idealistic folk songs of the ’60s, and immediately after it, “as long as I can have a limo and my orange hair!” refers to Ziggie-Stardust-era David Bowie, who really did have orange hair at the time. “Alice Bowie,” of course, is an amalgam of the names Alice Cooper and David Bowie.

Covers and samples of this song include Korn (a hidden track at the end of Follow the Leader), Soundgarden, 2 Live Crew, and Electric Magma.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Bob Dylan, Subterranean Homesick Blues. Album: Bringing It All Back Home (1965)

This song skips from one cultural reference to the next. It touches on social discontent (“20 years of schoolin’ and they put you on the day shift”), drug busts (“The phone’s tapped anyway/Maggie says that many say/They must bust in early May/Orders from the D.A.”), violent policing witnessed at civil rights protests (“Better stay away from those/That carry around a fire hose”) and the fight against authority (“Don’t follow leaders/Watch the parkin’ meters”).

The lyrics resemble a stream of consciousness, a writing technique championed by beat poets such as Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, both of whom were a major influence on Dylan. Musically, Dylan told the LA Timesthe song was inspired by Chuck Berry: “It’s from Chuck Berry, a bit of ‘Too Much Monkey Business’ and some of the scat songs of the forties.”John Lennon was apparently so captivated by this song, he worried he would never be able to write anything that could compete with it. Lennon quoted it in his 1980 Playboy interview, which was one of his last. He said, “Listen, there’s nothing wrong with following examples. We can have figure heads and people we admire, but we don’t need leaders. ‘Don’t follow leaders, watch the parking meters.'”

Musicians have alluded to this song for decades. Jet named their 2003 breakthrough album Get Born after the song’s lyric “Ah get born, keep warm.” Radiohead alluded to the track on the album, OK Computer, which features a song titled “Subterranean Homesick Blues.” The Gaslight Anthem’s song, “Angry Johnny and the Radio” includes the lines “I’m still here singin’ thinking about the government” and “Are you hidin’ in a basement mixin’ up the medicine?” both of which are referring to the opening lyrics to “Subterranean Homesick Blues”: “Johnny’s in the basement mixing up the medicine/I’m on the pavement thinkin’ about the Government.” Artists to have covered this song, meanwhile, include Red Hot Chili Peppers, Harry Nilsson and Glenn Campbell.

The American radical (some would say terrorist) group, the Weathermen, got their name from the lyric, “You don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows” (the lyric was also the title of their manifesto). The group, also known as the Weather Underground, had a left-wing agenda, opposing the Vietnam War and other American military actions with militant actions of their own

The title may have been a nod to Jack Kerouac’s novel The Subterraneans.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

13th Floor Elevators, Roller Coaster: Album: The Psychedelic Sounds Of The 13th Floor Elevators 1966

The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators is the debut studio album by the 13th Floor Elevators. The album’s sound, featuring elements of psychedelia, garage rock, folk, and blues, is notable for its use of the electric jug, as featured on the band’s only hit, “You’re Gonna Miss Me”, which reached number 55 on the Billboard Charts with “Tried to Hide” as a B-side. Another single from the album, “Reverberation (Doubt)”, reached number 129 on the Billboard’s Bubbling Under Chart.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Iggy Pop, The Idiot: March 18, 1977

The Idiot is the debut solo album by American musician Iggy Pop, released on March 18, 1977 by RCA Records. It was the first of two albums that Pop wrote and recorded in collaboration with David Bowie, who is credited as producer. The sessions for the album began before the recording of Bowie’s 1977 album Low; as a result, The Idiot has been called the unofficial beginning of Bowie’s Berlin period.

Described by Pop as “a cross between James Brown and Kraftwerk,” The Idiot marked a departure from the guitar-based proto-punk of his former band the Stooges, and has been compared with Bowie’s “Berlin Trilogy” of albums in its electronic Described by Pop as “a cross between James Brown and Kraftwerk,” The Idiot marked a departure from the guitar-based proto-punk of his former band the Stooges, and has been compared with Bowie’s “Berlin Trilogy” of albums in its electronic sounds and introspective atmosphere. Its title was taken from Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel of the same title, three of the participants in the recording — Bowie, Pop, and Tony Visconti — being familiar with the book. sounds and introspective atmosphere. Its title was taken from Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel of the same title, three of the participants in the recording — Bowie, Pop, and Tony Visconti — being familiar with the book.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Radiohead; Creep Off The Album Pablo Honey 1993

When asked about the song in 1993, lead singer Thom Yorke said, “I have a real problem being a man in the ’90s… Any man with any sensitivity or conscience toward the opposite sex would have a problem. To actually assert yourself in a masculine way without looking like you’re in a hard-rock band is a very difficult thing to do… It comes back to the music we write, which is not effeminate, but it’s not brutal in its arrogance. It is one of the things I’m always trying: To assert a sexual persona and on the other hand trying desperately to negate it.”

On the other hand, guitarist/keyboardist Jonny Greenwood said the song was in fact a happy song about “recognizing what you are.”

Yorke says this is about being in love with someone, but not feeling good enough. He describes the feeling as, “There’s the beautiful people and then there’s the rest of us.”

Yorke wrote this in 1987 while he was a student at Exeter University in England. He first recorded it acoustic.

This was written before the band formed. Yorke gave his demo version to Colin Greenwood, who joined him and helped put the band together.

This wasn’t released in the US until Radiohead’s debut album in 1993. The band finished college and signed their record deal in 1991.

On the album version, Thom Yorke sings, “You’re so f–king special.” For radio, he recut it as, “You’re so very special.” Yorke regrets changing the line for the radio version, saying it disturbed the “sentiment of the song.” According to him, the song lost its anger as a result.The video, directed by Brett Turnbull, was recorded at a club in Oxford called The Zodiac.

One of the extras in the crowd scenes is a teenage Kieran Hebden, aka Four Tet. The producer and DJ has remixed Thom Yorke and Radiohead tracks and also supported Radiohead on tour.

This is nicknamed “Crap” by the band due its slacker-anthem ubiquity.

When this was first released in England in 1992, the song flopped. It did well when it was re-released a year later, after Radiohead grew a fan base.

The three blasts of guitar noise that precede the chorus was the result of Jonny Greenwood trying to sabotage a tune he considered too “wimpy.”

Yorke claims he received fan mail from “murderers” saying how much they could relate to this song.

According to the book Radiohead: Hysterical and Useless, this song was inspired by Thom’s obsession with a stranger. He was infatuated with a woman who was out of his league, who he’d never met but frequently saw in bars, and he found himself following her around. When he finally got himself drunk enough to build up the courage to confess his obsession, she freaked out.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

A History of Gwar, the Best Satirical Extraterrestrial Metal Band Ever.

Say what you will about their Satanic-looking masks, gnarly R-rated-Jim-Henson-warrior outfits, and strapped-on penis appendages – no band has ever made monster metal like Gwar. Then again, when a band essentially creates its own genre from scratch, they really don’t have much competition.

Born in 1984 out of the Richmond, Virginia artist collective known as Slave Pit, Gwar embodies a certain kind of rock sensibility that seems like the brainchild of a metal-loving teenager who would go on to become a performance artist. Their band members have names like Oderus Urungus (“undying chaos demon” the late Dave Brockie) and Balsac the Jaws of Death (Mike Dirks)

Following the death of frontman and lead singer Dave Brockie in 2014, the group has continued without any of its founding members. As part of their mythos, are a group of intergalactic “chaos warriors” that were banished to Earth and became “the sickest band in metal history.” (They also throw really great “Gwar-B-Qs.”)

But beyond the fun, shock-and-awe value of a lot of the memorabilia, there’s also the story of an artist collective and a movement that set itself apart from the hardcore punk in nearby Washington, D.C. in the early 1980s by mixing its social commentary with monster masks, satire, and political commentary. The exhibit will also show how the band’s mythology and decidedly intense live shows fostered a unique fan community that emerged before social media and has persisted for three decades – from the 1980s to Beavis and Butt-Head and beyond.

“I think people don’t always see Gwar as being in the context of theater,” Benjamin Thorp, the exhibit’s curator, told WIRED. “We understand theater as being this massive undertaking that takes years to develop – to create props, sets, narratives, production, drawings, budgets, and all of this stuff that we’re presenting – I think it puts them in the context I believe they deserve to be viewed in.”

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Rock Bitch

Rockbitch were an expat, British, mostly female, metal band, who performed nude and incorporated sexual acts and Pagan rituals into their performances.Associated acts.

The band was originally formed (as Red Abyss) by bassist Amanda Smith-Skinner from the members of a free sex commune, where monogamy is outlawed. Musically, Red Abyss drew on jazz, funk and rock influences dominated by singer Julie’s Janis Joplin-influenced vocals. In time Red Abyss’s music became harder edged, drawing on punk and metal influences. As its line-up changed, this led to a name change to Rockbitch. Rockbitch was nearly ready to call it a day due to the apathy of male-dominated rock audiences.

At what was intended to be their last gig (at a biker festival) Rockbitch decided to put the wild sex of their home life into the stage act. They went down a storm and decided to continue touring in order to spread their pro-sex message. The most infamous part of their stage act was “The Golden Condom” contest. This involved throwing the so-called golden condom out into the audience. Whoever caught it (man or woman) was taken backstage for sex with one or more band members. The intention of this was to prove the band were not just an act and were ready to stand by their beliefs.

Rockbitch toured widely from the late ’90s until 2002, meeting increasing resistance from authorities, particularly English town councils who were constantly banning gigs. Large sections of their audience (particularly in England) tended to consist of drunken lads just wanting to see some nudity, with no interest in the message. However Rockbitch also began to attract a small following of men and women who seemingly understood the band’s message and had their lives changed forever. Outside the UK (particularly in Holland) they sometimes played to more sympathetic audiences. However, in Germany they suffered many censorship problems.

Psychedelic Lunch