On the 10th anniversary of his death, many articles have been published memorializing Peter Steele, the singer, songwriter, and bassist of gothic metal band Type O Negative, but only a few mention that he passed away in Scranton.

That may seem like an unlikely place for a rock star to reside, but public records show that Peter Thomas Ratajczyk, better known as Peter Steele, lived in a simple home at 1453 St. Ann Street in West Scranton in 2009-2010. According to the biography “Soul on Fire – The Life and Music of Peter Steele” by metal journalist Jeff Wagner, he also attended services regularly at St. Ann’s Monastery and Shrine Basilica just up the street:

Peter reveled in singing at church. On Christmas Eve 2009, he was late for the service and had to sit in the only available space, the front and center pew. Even if Peter was incredibly self-conscious about that, he belted out each hymn with booming baritone passion. As he sang, one wonders if Peter was thinking of all those who had passed away, unable to congratulate him on finding his own place of peace, unable to share it with him. His father, his mother, his sister Annette, various aunts, uncles, and friends. “Sleep in heavenly peace,” sang that unmistakable voice in its rich, inspired tones. “Sleep in heavenly peace…”

His obituary has no mention of his Scranton residence:

Peter Steele, vocalist and bassist for the platinum-selling band Type O Negative, has died at 48.

He died of apparent heart failure, though the official cause of death has yet to be determined pending autopsy results.

The Brooklyn-based band released seven studio albums. Their breakout success was 1993’s platinum-selling “Bloody Kisses,”featuring “Black No. 1 (Little Miss Scare-All)” and the band’s cover of Seals and Crofts’ “Summer Breeze.” Though they scored few subsequent commercial successes in the U.S., the band toured extensively and enjoyed a large European fan base.

The funeral services will be private and memorial services will be announced at a future date.

It was later reported that he died of an aortic aneurysm on April 14, 2010, and his estate clarified that the cause of death was actually sepsis brought on by diverticulitis. While Steele struggled with drugs and alcohol throughout his life, he was clean and sober by 2009 and allegedly living in Scranton to be close to his girlfriend following his recovery.

This short obituary seems to undercut the influential sound and massive fan base Type O Negative garnered with world tours and seven studio albums in the 1990s and early 2000s which, in addition to “Bloody Kisses,” included 1996’s gold-selling “October Rust” and what ended up being their final record, “Dead Again,”released in 2007 after leaving their longtime label, Roadrunner Records.

A statement issued by Steele’s family following his death described Type O Negative as “a groundbreaking group known for its dramatic lyrical emphasis on the themes of romance, depression, and death. Steele, renowned as much for his striking physical appearance as his musical talent, was the creative force behind the band’s 20-year success, writing most of the material for their albums. Type O Negative and Steele have been lauded as a major influence by numerous alternative and metal bands. … Peter Steele was a complex man, known for his brooding looks, his self-deprecating sense of humor, unique view of the world, and most of all his loyalty to his fans, friends, and family.”

His bandmates said he seemed to be doing well just before his untimely death, and he was excited about making their next album. “Ironically, Peter had been enjoying a long period of sobriety and improved health and was imminently due to begin writing and recording new music,” the band noted in their official statement. In a new interview with Billboard, drummer Johnny Kelly recalls when Steele was living in Scranton:

Following the Dead Again World Tour that ended in Detroit on Halloween 2009 – what turned out to be the foursome’s last show together – Kelly and Steele spoke often in the time leading up to his death. [Guitarist Kenny] Hickey and Kelly were living in Staten Island; Steele was in Scranton, Pa., with his girlfriend. Steele had found a place situated right between Hickey’s and Kelly’s, and was planning to move back by May 1 so they could begin writing and recording their eighth album. Kelly says that was also the date they could start moving gear into a local studio.

“Kenny and I went to check out a place the night before he died and tried calling him while we were at the studio to tell him that we found a place, and he didn’t answer,” he remembers. Steele had bad reception on his cell phone, so they tried his landline. “I called him on the house phone, and his girlfriend answered, and I said, ‘Can I talk to Peter?,’ and she said he was in bed sick.” (Steele was sick with the flu several days prior to his death.) “She said, ‘He told me to tell you, “Sorry I didn’t call you back.”’”

Steele also had a very sick cat, and Kelly feared the animal’s illness may have left Steele in an emotional state that led him to relapse. “When I was on the phone, I said, ‘Is there anything going on out there that I should know about?’” recalls Kelly. “She was like, ‘No, he’s sick, nothing like that.’ I was like, ‘Tell him to call me when he’s feeling better.’

“And then I got a call from his sister that night that he passed away,” he says. “So that’s it.”

The surviving members chose not to continue with the band following his death. Steele was buried at St. Charles Cemetery in East Farmingdale, New York, and an oak tree was planted in Prospect Park in Brooklyn in 2011 to remember him in his hometown. A photo by MCMZone dated January of 2010 shows Steele posing with singer/songwriter Myke Hideous and a film crew in Scranton just a few months before he died. They were recording his last-known interview for a documentary called “Living the American Nightmare,” which was released in 2011.

While he grew a beard and put on some weight at the time, Steele had long black hair and stood 6′ 8″ tall, so he would have been hard to miss during his brief time in Scranton, though few may have looked for a tattooed frontman known for his dark lyrics and humor – as well as his infamous nude photo shoot for Playgirl – in a church on St. Ann Street.

The band has sold 2.5 million albums and accumulated 98.4 million streams in the United States alone, according to Nielsen Music/MRC Data, so it’s clear that his legacy will live on for many years to come as fans all over the world listen to his music and mourn him today.

11 years ago today, Type O Negative frontman Peter Steele died

It’s April 12th and here are some reasons why this day matters in rock history:

In 1954, Bill Haley recorded “Rock Around the Clock” at Pythian Temple studios in New York City. Many music lovers consider the song the one that started the rock and roll revolution.

In 2011, the Foo Fighters released their album, Wasting Light.

In 2000, Metallica filed suit against Napster as well as Yale University, The University of Southern California and Indiana University for copyright infringement.

In 1975, Elton John started a two-week run on top of the singles chart with “Philadelphia Freedom.”

In 1994, Hole released their second album, Live Through This.

In 1983, R.E.M. released their debut album, Murmur.

n 1971, Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young’s live album 4 Way Street was certified gold before it even appeared on the album chart.

In 1975, David Bowie announced his second career retirement, saying, “I’ve rocked my roll. It’s a boring dead end, there will be no more rock ‘n roll records from me.” His next album would come out nine months later.

And in 2016, a court ruled that Led Zeppelin founders Robert Plant and Jimmy Page had to face trial in a copyright claim over “Stairway to Heaven.” The trustee for Spirit guitarist Randy Wolfe, claimed that he should be given writing credit on the track.

And that’s what happened today in rock history.

Photo: Getty Images

Why April 12th Matters in Rock History

Photo credit: Chuck Brueckmann

ALTER BRIDGE and SLASH FEATURING MYLES KENNEDY AND THE CONSPIRATORS vocalist Myles Kennedywill release his sophomore solo album, “The Ides Of March”, on May 14 via Napalm Records. You can now watch the official music video for the title track below.

“The Ides Of March” is the longest song on the LP, clocking in at 7:39, and showcases the musicianship of Kennedy and his cohorts — longtime friend and drummer Zia Uddin and bassist/manager Tim Tournier. The band stretches out musically as Kennedy sings an ominous warning: “beware the ides of March.”

Myles says about “The Ides Of March”: “Written quickly one night after having a few drinks, it was an attempt to sum up what so many of us felt during the beginning of the pandemic. We were bored, frustrated and self-medicating to avoid going stir crazy. What I like about the narrative, is it pushes the idea that if everything is going to hell, at least try and do it in a celebratory fashion.”

During his time at home due to all touring being canceled, Myles created the framework for the song ideas that would make up “The Ides Of March”. He then called up his cohorts from his “Year Of The Tiger” debut — Uddin and Tournier — and the three musicians drove to Florida to record the album with longtime producer Michael “Elvis” Baskette.

From the slide guitar riffs of the album opener “Get Along” to the pensive blues style of closer “Worried Mind”, it is clear that Myleshas crafted a formidable follow up to his debut solo album. While “Year Of The Tiger” was more of an acoustic exploration through Myles‘s mind, “The Ides Of March” finds him strapping on his electric guitar and pushing himself as a guitarist/songwriter. Tracks like “A Thousand Words”, “Wake Me When It’s Over” and “Moonshot” showcase the diverse musical arrangements that have garnered Myles fans globally across all of his projects. The epic “The Ides Of March”clocks in at over seven minutes, and Myles, Tim and Zia showcase their musical chops on the track.

“The Ides Of March” track listing:

01. Get Along 
02. A Thousand Words 
03. In Stride 
04. The Ides Of March 
05. Wake Me When It’s Over 
06. Love Rain Down 
07. Tell It Like It Is 
08. Moonshot 
09. Wanderlust Begins 
10. Sifting Through The Fire 
11. Worried Mind

In November, Myles told Kylie Olsson about how “The Ides Of March” compares to “Year Of The Tiger”: “It dawned on me last night as I was listening [to the new album], I was, like, ‘You basically made a rock record.’ [Laughs] I don’t know if I went into it with that intention initially. And I feel like it definitely is still a continuation of the overall style that was established for the solo project on ‘Year Of The Tiger’. There’s a fair amount of acoustic instrumentation; there’s a lot of lap steel [guitar]. I love the lap steel; I just love the way you can make it weep — it’s got a very vocal quality. But then I realized there’s just a lot of guitar and a lot more solos — you know, guitar geek stuff that I enjoy.”

A month earlier, Kennedy told Terrie Carr of the Morristown, New Jersey radio station 105.5 WDHA that it was a joy to reconnect with UddinTournier and Baskette for the making of the new LP.

“Oh, yeah, it was great,” he said. “It was great, because we actually drove [to the studio in Florida]. So Zia, my drummer, who, we’ve played together for the last 30 years, off and on, since we were in high school. He’s, in my opinion, one of the greatest rock and roll drummers alive; he’s so good, it’s mind-boggling. So we started driving. We left Spokane, with the gear in tow. And then we met Tim about halfway. I think we met somewhere in Tennessee, maybe. Then we after driving to Orlando, we all quarantined. Zia did his drums and then he went home, and then Tim finished up. He hung around for a little while. And then I was there for, I think, seven weeks with Elvis.”

He continued: “It’s a fun environment. We all love each other dearly. I’m serious when I say this: we’re a bunch of middle-aged children. I mean, it’s as if we’ve taken a time machine and we’re in the seventh grade. And the humor is ridiculously silly. I don’t even know how to articulate how ridiculous it gets when you put all of us in a studio together. [Laughs]”

Myles‘s tour in support of “Year Of The Tiger” featured music from the album as well as selections from Myles‘s work with ALTER BRIDGE, THE MAYFIELD FOUR and SLASH FEATURING MYLES KENNEDY AND THE CONSPIRATORS.

MYLES KENNEDY Releases Music Video For ‘The Ides Of March’ Title Track

In honor of National Women’s Day we wanted to honor a few women in music of whom paved the way for other women in music. These women crossed barriers and changed how music is enjoyed today in a previously male dominated industry.

Ma Rainey created what is now known as “classic blues” while also portraying black life like never before. As a musical innovator she built on the minstrelsy and vaudeville performative traditions with comedic timing and a hybrid of American blues traditions she encountered in her vast tours across the country.

Sarah McLachlan

Not only was it a turning point in her career, but her tour is also credited for breaking down barriers in the music industry, making it a turning point for women in music. … It was also believed that tours with multiple women artists would not bring in the crowds that men could however she proved that to be a misconception with “Lilith Fair.”

Whitney Houston

Of course, the most awarded female artist of all-time is on this list. She started singing as a young girl in church, and never stopped, becoming a household name who still holds the record for best-selling single. Anyone heard of a little song called “I Will Always Love You”?

Madonna

Madonna took risks with her music by tackling tabu subject matter and was a target for ridicule by men in the industry.

With 16 Guinness World Records, 7 Grammys, and 68 nominations for the MTV Music Awards, it’s safe to say Madonna will go down in history as a pop icon, brilliant business woman with major talent who paved the way for other singers. There’d be no Gaga, Britney or any other pop songstress without her.

Dolly Parton

Singer, songwriter, record producer, author, businesswoman, philanthropist — you name it, and Dolly Parton has done it. She’s written over 3,000 songs and changed the course of country music forever. Still not convinced? Give a listen to podcast “Dolly Parton’s America” and good luck trying not to binge it all in a day.

Nicknamed “Lady Day” by her friend and music partner Lester Young, Holiday had an innovative influence on jazz music and pop singing. Her vocal style, strongly inspired by jazz instrumentalists, pioneered a new way of manipulating phrasing and tempo. She was known for her vocal delivery and improvisational skills.

She pushed cultural boundaries and addressed racism in a very dangerous time on stage which made her a target by the FBI. To great controversy, Billie introduced the world to the racially charged protest song “Strange Fruit.” In the end, some believe it killed her.

In March 1939, a 23-year-old Billie Holiday walked up to the mic at West 4th’s Cafe Society in New York City to sing her final song of the night. Per her request, the waiters stopped serving and the room went completely black, save for a spotlight on her face. And then she sang, softly in her raw and emotional voice: “Southern trees bear a strange fruit, Blood on the leaves and blood at the root, Black body swinging in the Southern breeze, Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees…”

When Holiday finished, the spotlight turned off. When the lights came back on, the stage was empty. She was gone. And per her request, there was no encore. This was how Holiday performed “Strange Fruit,” which she would determinedly sing for the next 20 years until her untimely death at the age of 44.

“Strange Fruit” was originally a poem

Holiday may have popularized “Strange Fruit” and turned it into a work of art, but it was a Jewish communist teacher and civil rights activist from the Bronx, Abel Meeropol, who wrote it, first as a poem, then later as a song.

Considered by many to be one of the greatest jazz vocalists of all time, Billie Holiday triumphed over adversity to forever change the genres of jazz and pop music with her unique styling and interpretation.

Aretha Franklin

Aretha Franklin won a record eight consecutive Grammys for best R&B vocal performance from 1967-1974. The “Queen of Soul” was the first woman inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, and sang at historic events in U.S. history like the memorial for Martin Luther King Jr. and the 2009 inauguration for President Barack Obama. Franklin also topped Rolling Stone’s list of 100 Greatest Singers of All Time.

Joan Baez

Joan Baez closed the first day of Woodstock in 1969 and almost instantly achieved a new level of fame with her standout performance. A decade earlier, at only 18, she had performed at the Newport Folk Festival. Throughout her career, Baez has been a champion for civil rights and humanitarian causes, and in 2015, Amnesty International awarded her its top honor—the Ambassador of Conscience Award—for her continuing leadership and efforts in this arena.

Diana Ross

As the lead singer of The Supremes, Diana Ross shattered music records from 1965 to 1969. The Supremes are revered as one of the top girl groups of all time, with a dozen #1 hits. By 1970, Ross left the group to pursue a solo career. Her first two singles hit #1, and she went on to star in a number of films, including “Lady Sings the Blues,” which garnered her an Oscar nomination; “Mahogany”; and “The Wiz.” Ross was recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the most successful female artist of all time, and the book produced a special commemorative Diana Ross edition in 1993.

Tina Turner

Tina Turner was the second artist on the cover of Rolling Stone, and the first female and Black artist to be on the cover of the famed magazine. She started her career in the late 1950s, and for nearly 20 years, she performed with her ex-husband Ike. After leaving him and pursuing a career on her own, it was the 1984 release of “Private Dancer” that put her back on track. Turner has been christened the “Queen of Rock” and was a major inspiration to artists like Beyoncé.

Carole King

In the 1960s, Carole King wrote many hits for some of music’s top acts, setting a precedent for female songwriters. Five decades later, she won the Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song—the first woman to win the award. King’s standout career was later recapped in a smash Broadway play, “Beautiful.”

Joni Mitchell

In 2017, NPR set out to name the top 150 albums made by women. At #1 on that list? Joni Mitchell’s 1971 classic, “Blue.” Called simple and radical, “Blue” was a rousing call for equality. Mitchell’s influence on the music world—for male and female musicians alike—runs deep.

National Women’s Day

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch Series,” Lilith Fair Edition, where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

She grew up in a rural Missouri town and graduated from the University of Missouri in 1984 with a degree in classical music. Her first job out of college was teaching music at an elementary school in St. Louis.

In 1986, she moved to Los Angeles, where she waited tables before landing a gig as a backup singer on Michael Jackson’s Bad tour. She was a backup singer on tours for George Harrison, Joe Cocker, and Rod Stewart before starting her solo career.

Her first album, Tuesday Night Music Club, wasn’t released until she was 31. She blames her late start on the music industry – in the late ’80s record companies were after dance singers like Madonna and Paula Abdul. Crow got her shot when female singer/songwriters came into vogue in the early ’90s with a mature sound that played well to an older audience.

She sang in jingles for McDonald’s. Her line was “It’s a good time for the great taste of McDonalds.”

Like the Dixie Chicks, she was very outspoken in her opposition to the Iraq War, but most of her fans were too. “It’s an egregious act to drag our country and other countries into a war that is based on greed and power mongering,” she said.

She gained a lot of exposure when she opened for The Eagles on their 1994 reunion tour. She was a backup singer on Don Henley’s album The End Of The Innocence.

In 1996 Kevin Gilbert, her former boyfriend and songwriting partner, died of autoerotic asphyxiation, a fetish where people cut off their air supply to get sexual pleasure. It is rumored that this is how Michael Hutchince from INXS died.

Crow is good friends with Stevie Nicks, and inducted Fleetwood Mac into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998.

In 2005, she and cycling legend Lance Armstrong announced their engagement. In early 2006, they called it off.

Her father was a trumpet player and her mother played piano and sang. Sheryl recalled to The Guardian: “My earliest, most vivid memories are of them coming home with their friends and playing records – Stan Getz, Stan Kenton, Ella Fitzgerald – and me and my sisters sleeping out on the stairs so we could hear them.”

She dated Eric Clapton for a while. He appeared on her album Sheryl Crow and Friends: Live From Central Park in 1999, around the time of their relationship.

Sheryl Crow performed in “Lilith Fair” 3 times.

She is the mother to two adopted sons. Wyatt Steven Crow was born on April 29, 2007 and Levi James Crow on April 30, 2010.

The first guitar that Crow ever brought was a 1964 Gibson Country and Western acoustic. She said in 2013: “Every song I’ve ever written that made me any money, I wrote on the same guitar. I call it The Moneymaker.”

Crow’s lawyer father defended civil rights and once prosecuted the Ku Klux Klan for ballot-rigging. He received death threats and had to sleep downstairs with a shotgun.

She posed for the UK version of the laddie magazine Maxim in 1999, and for it’s sister publication, Stuff, in America in 2002. Despite these revealing photo shoots, she took younger artists to task for using their sexuality to sell. “You’ve got a bunch of really young women out there who don’t really understand the importance of what they’re doing,” she told Independent Life in 2004. “They allow themselves to be exploited and they actually play that game and use sex to sell themselves. It undermines our credibility as artists.”

Sheryl Crow is an excellent baton twirler. She told Q Magazine: “If you were to go on YouTube they can see that I’ve twirled behind John Mayer on a couple of occasions. It was something I honed in high school and then incorporated into my act much later. Generally, as the end of tour prank, I’d go up and twirl while someone is singing their most sensitive song.”

You know who else is good with a baton? Crow’s friend Stevie Nicks, who twirls in the “Tusk” video.

Psychedelic Lunch

PHOTO BY PRINCE MIDNIGHT INSTAGRAM

It Honours the man who ‘introduced me to metal’

Now this is what you call a hollow-body guitar. The Tampa musician calling himself Prince Midnight built this conversation-starter (and ender?) from his uncle’s skeleton fused to the, erm, bones of a Fender Telecaster. And it works.Midnight’s Uncle Filip had died in a 1996 motorcycle accident in Greece, at the age of 26. “After 20 years, he ended up in a cemetery my family had to pay rent on. Like, literally in a wooden box,” Midnight told HuffPost. “It’s a big problem in Greece because the Orthodox religion doesn’t want people cremated.”

With Filip’s parents deceased, the bones — after a couple of decades of being used for research at a college — were sent to Midnight’s mother in Florida.“Uncle Filip was a super metal head,” he told CBC’s As It Happens. “He got me totally into metal when I was a little kid because he was my mother’s younger brother, so he was closer to my age, and took me under his wing.”

As his mother was not interested in paying a storage fee on the remains, nor in buying a burial plot, his nephew stepped in to take care of Filip. Mom was a bit reticent about her son’s project.“When this first started happening, she was really upset,” said Midnight, who is on Instagram as princemidnightx. “She said, ‘It’s sacrilegious. He needs to be laid to rest.’

“And as she was walking away, I was like, ‘You think Uncle Fil would rather be a guitar, or a box of bones?’ She threw her arms up. She goes, ‘Probably the guitar.’” And so his project began.

Knowing Filip had been a metal musician, Midnight wanted to honour him in an appropriate way. “It just popped into my head. I’m going to turn Uncle Fil into a guitar. And I was like, that is the best way to honour him. He would love that idea.”

He had to fuse a steel “spine” to the real spine in order to attach the neck, then he had to ensure it was perfectly straight so the strings would work. The spinal vertebrae gaps had to be filled in for stability, and the ribs were supported by connecting them back to the thoracic spine. Then he had to drill into the hip bone to attach the jack connection, and also connect the two ilium for more stability.

He wanted to use the skull, but it had been damaged over the years. Then he wired it up, using red and blue wires to imitate veins and arteries. Now, he says, “I feel like Uncle Fil is not just here figuratively; he’s here literally too,” he told As It Happens host Carol Off. “I’m literally giving my Uncle Fil hugs while he’s with me, creating, you know, heavy metal riffs.”

“It’s pretty metal to play a guitar made out of skeleton.”

Skelecaster: Florida man turns his uncle’s skeleton into electric guitar

INTRODUCING CRAFT RECORDINGS’ “SMALL BATCH”:AN ALL-ANALOG LIMITED EDITION, ONE-STEP VINYL SERIESOFFERING THE HIGHEST QUALITY LISTENING EXPERIENCE
JOHN COLTRANE’S LUSH LIFE TO LAUNCH COLLECTION—AVAILABLE NOW TO PRE-ORDER AND DUE OUT FEBRUARY 19thEXCLUSIVELY THROUGH CRAFTRECORDINGS.COM

Click here to pre-order now

Los Angeles, CA (January 14, 2021)—Craft Recordings is thrilled to announce their Small Batch series—a carefully curated audiophile collection devoted to creating the highest quality vinyl reissues of legendary recordings from their vast catalog. Each album selected for the series will undergo all-analog mastering, and then be pressed on 180-gram vinyl in a one-step lacquer process—as opposed to the standard three-step process—allowing for the highest level of musical detail, clarity, and dynamics while reducing the amount of surface noise on the record. The limited nature of these pressings guarantees that each record is a true representation of the original lacquer and is as close as the listener can get to the original recording. Authentic sound, distilled to its purest form.
Each Small Batch pressing, available exclusively on CraftRecordings.com, will be individually numbered and housed in a foil-stamped, linen-wrapped slipcase featuring an acrylic inset of the original artwork. The vinyl disc—extractable through a unique frictionless ribbon pull tab—will be housed in a reproduction of the original album jacket, complete with tip-on jacket, and protected by an archival-quality, anti-static, non-scratching inner sleeve. New liner notes from some of music’s best educators, historians, and journalists will accompany each title.
Launching the Small Batch series will be John Coltrane’s iconic 1961 album, Lush Life—celebrating its 60th anniversary this year—available on February 19th and limited to 1,000 copies worldwide. For this reissue, the original analog tapes—recorded at Rudy Van Gelder’sHackensack, NJ studios—were sent to GRAMMY®-Award winning mastering engineer Bernie Grundman, who utilized a custom tube pre-amp and analog mixing console with discrete electronics—both made in-house—as well as a Scully solid-state lathe with custom electronics. “When it comes to jazz, all you want to do is present the music in a good way. No gimmicks. No extra compression. Just the pure instruments,” explains Grundman. “We’re taking these old tapes and playing them off of equipment that’s similar to what they were recorded on. We want to preserve the sound as much as we can. My goal is to do all of this by hand as it’s playing. It takes a lot of preparation. It takes choreographing.” In the end, Grundman says, “It’s all about trying to optimize the experience for the listener.”
Grundman’s lacquers were then sent to Record Technology Incorporated (RTI) for plating using the plant’s one-step process, as described above, where the lacquers are used to create a “convert” that becomes the record stamper. Utilizing Neotech’s VR900 compound, Lush Life was then pressed on to 180-gram vinyl. Preview the full package via the unboxing trailer, here.
Recorded in three sessions over 1957 and 1958, Lush Life finds Coltrane on the verge of a career breakout. Though he was still a few years away from emerging as an influential and boundary-pushing bandleader, the saxophonist’s mature and complex sound was beginning to grab ears and sell records. Here, he’s accompanied by an all-star lineup of talent, including Red Garland on piano, Paul Chambers on bass, Donald Byrd on trumpet, and Art Taylor on drums. The tracklist, comprised of standards and popular tunes of the day, offers a wide range of moods. Highlights include Cole Porter’s “I Love You,” the Jimmy Van Heusen/Johnny Burke hit “Like Someone in Love,” and one original—“Trane’s Slo Blues.” In the package’s new liner notes, GRAMMY® Award-winning writer Ashley Kahn points out that the Billy Strayhorn-penned title track—now a jazz standard—was an unusual choice at the time. In the late ‘50s, “Lush Life” was “more of a specialty tune…known primarily by a coterie of jazz players and dedicated fans.” Kahn adds, “One could not with any confidence call it a jam session, hoping that all the players would know the changes and the singer would have a handle on the lyric. Its harmony was complex and unusual, and it did not fit the 32-bar structure most songs followed…How bold it must have been for a John Coltrane album to not only bear the title of Strayhorn’s off-center song, but feature a fourteen-minute interpretation as its centerpiece. This is truly a band version of ‘Lush Life’—arguably the first—that builds steadily in intensity and offers a variety of textures through its free-wheeling duration.”
Upon its release, Lush Life was a critical and commercial success, garnering a rare five-star review from Downbeat. The album continues to be counted as a standout recording in Coltrane’s all-too-short career. In recent years, AllMusic listed Lush Life “among John Coltrane’s best endeavors on the Prestige label,” while All About Jazz praised that “the record documents Coltrane’s rapid growth over a short period of time while also showcasing how great a talent Coltrane was, even at this early stage.” In his notes, Kahn affirms that the recording “serves to capture the already expansive nature of Coltrane’s approach in late ’57 and early ’58: the love of melody and that melancholy, searching spirit. The restless embellishing, and those sheets of sound just as they began to unfurl.”
Subscribe at CraftRecordings.com for news first on future Small Batch pressings.
For more information and to pre-order Lush Life, visit CraftRecordings.com/SmallBatch.

Tracklist – Lush Life: Side A:1. Like Someone in Love2. I Love You3. Trane’s Slo Blues
Side B:1. Lush Life2. I Hear a Rhapsody

About Craft Recordings:Craft Recordings is home to one of the largest and most prestigious collections of master recordings and compositions in the world. Its rich and storied repertoire includes legendary artists such as Joan Baez, Ray Charles, John Coltrane, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Vince Guaraldi, John Lee Hooker, Little Richard, Nine Inch Nails, Thelonious Monk, Otis Redding, R.E.M. and Traveling Wilburys, to name just a few. Renowned imprints with catalogs issued under the Craft banner include Concord, Fania, Fantasy, Fearless, Milestone, Musart, Nitro, Prestige, Riverside, Rounder, Specialty, Stax, Sugar Hill, Vanguard, Vee-Jay and Victory, among many others. Craft creates thoughtfully curated packages, with a meticulous devotion to quality and a commitment to preservation—ensuring that these recordings endure for new generations to discover. Craft Recordings is the catalog label team for Concord Recorded Music. For more info, visit CraftRecordings.com and follow on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram,YouTube, and Spotify.

Craft Recordings announces “Small Batch,” a limited edition, one-step vinyl series

DARK NIGHTS: DEATH METAL – BAND EDITION: CRANKING IT UP TO 11 FOR THE HIT COMIC BOOK SERIES’ WORLD TOUR THIS MARCH

BURBANK, CA (February 1, 2021) – In anticipation of the international launch of DC’s runaway 2020 hit limited series, Dark Nights: Death Metal, the publisher announced today plans to collaborate with seven of the most renowned metal music bands for Dark Nights: Death Metal – Band Edition.

Representing a cross-section of metal music from across genres and generations, each special edition will feature a variant cover spotlighting a different metal band, an introduction from the band and exclusive interview. The lineup includes:

Issue #1: Featured band: Megadeth
Cover artist: Juanjo Guarnido

Issue #2: Featured band: Ghost
Cover artist: Werther Dell’ Edera

Issue #3: Featured band: Lacuna Coil
Cover artist: Timpano / Antonio Fuso

Issue #4: Featured band: Opeth
Cover artist: Mathieu Lauffray

Issue #5: Featured band: Sepultura
Cover artist: Albuquerque / Pedro Mauro

Issue #6: Featured band: Dream Theater
Cover artist: Santi Casas

Issue #7: Featured band: Ozzy Osbourne
Cover artist: Marco Mastrazzo

The Dark Knights: Death Metal seven-issue series event will launch in 13 countries internationally in March and rollout throughout 2021.

Dark Nights: Death Metal, from the bestselling team of writer Scott Snyder and artist Greg Capullo, launched in the U.S in June 2020. Dark Knights: Death Metal is the sequel to the smash-hit 2017-18 series Dark Nights: Metal, which brought widespread changes to the DC universe and introduced fans to the Dark Multiverse and a runaway-hit villain, the Batman Who Laughs.

When the Earth is enveloped by the Dark Multiverse, the Justice League is at the mercy of the Batman Who Laughs. Humanity struggles to survive in a hellish landscape twisted beyond recognition, while Batman, Wonder Woman, and Superman, who have all been separated, fight to survive.

The seven single issues with the Band edition variant covers will be published monthly in eight countries: France, Spain, Italy, Germany, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina and Turkey.

For the Collectors’ Omnibus Edition featuring additional bonus content, these eight countries will be joined by Russia, Poland, Czech Republic, Korea and Japan.

DC’s international publishing partners from each participating country will announce their respective release dates with press releases soon, so check out their social media for the latest information.

For more information about Dark Nights: Death Metal and the World’s Greatest Super Heroes, visit the website at www.dcomics.com, and follow on social media @DCComics and @thedcnation.

About DC

DC, a WarnerMedia Company, creates iconic characters, enduring stories, and immersive experiences that inspire and entertain audiences of every generation around the world and is one of the world’s largest publishers of comics and graphic novels. As a creative division, DC is charged with strategically integrating its stories and characters across film, television, consumer products, home entertainment, interactive games, DC UNIVERSE INFINITE digital subscription service and community engagement portal. For more information visit dccomics.com and dcuniverseinfinite.com.

DC Joins With Ozzy Osbourne, Megadeth and More For Dark Nights: Death Metal – Band Edition

This story broke out Monday February 1st 2021 and is all over the internet that Marilyn Manson abused Evan Rachael Wood during their relationship. The actress took to her Instagram feed and this is what she had to say.

Not long after her post his record label Loma Vista Records dropped him and erased his existence from their website.

In a statement, Loma Vista wrote: “In light of today’s disturbing allegations by Evan Rachel Wood and other women naming Marilyn Manson as their abuser, Loma Vista will cease to further promote his current album, effective immediately. Due to these concerning developments, we have also decided not to work with Marilyn Manson on any future projects.”

Manson began working with Loma Vista for his 2015 record, The Pale Emperor, inking a deal that allowed the musician to retain the rights to his music while Loma Vista would distribute it. The arrangement remained similar on Manson’s next two albums — 2017’s Heaven Upside Down and last year’s We Are Chaos — with Manson retaining the copyright while granting Loma Vista an exclusive license.

His guest appearance in Starz drama American Gods will also be removed.

Manson was due to be seen in an upcoming episode but the US TV network Starz said in a statement: “Due to the allegations made against Marilyn Manson, we have decided to remove his performance from the remaining episode he is in, scheduled to air later this season. Starz stands unequivocally with all victims and survivors of abuse.”

Additionally, AMC’s Shudder has pulled Manson’s episode of the horror anthology series Creepshow, according to Deadline. He appears in an upcoming episode of the show’s second season and his segment will be replaced, the outlet reports.

Manson has since denied the allegations of abuse on his Instagram account stating that his intimate relationships were all consensual with like minded people.

Manson has been portrayed as highly controversial and satanic due to the lyrical content of his music for years.

On April 20th 1999 there was a Columbine Highschool Massacre and it was blamed on Marilyn Mansons music.

Shortly after Columbine killers Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris committed the grisliest high school shooting in history, the town tried to ban Marilyn Manson’s music. 

Manson took it upon himself to cancel his remaining concert dates around the country out of respect for the Columbine victims. He did not show his face in Denver for several years, in fact.

A month after Columbine, Manson wrote an article for Rolling Stone titled Columbine: Whose Fault Is It? 

It’s quite an articulate and provocative essay, considering it’s written by a man the media portray as nothing more than a Satan-worshipping androgynous freak. He argued that people are outraged when these things happen, but it’s an empty outrage.

In March 2018 Evan Rachel Wood testified in front of Congress and detailed a harrowing account of sexual and physical abuse with an intimate partner. The heart-wrenching testimony was part of a push for more states to adopt the Sexual Assault Survivors’ Bill of Rights Act. Sitting among fellow activists against sexual violence, Wood courageously told the congressional committee, “I was not fine, and I am not fine.”

At this point she didn’t name Marilyn Manson publicly as her abuser.

“The song ‘I Want to Kill You Like They Do in The Movies’ is about my fantasies,” Marilyn Manson told a Spin reporter in 2009. Responding to a question about his relationship with ex, Evan Rachel Wood, Manson continued, “I have fantasies every day about smashing her skull in with a sledgehammer.”

He was being asked about his new album and was asked: ‘It sounds like the period after you and Evan Rachel Wood broke up was really tough. What was your lowest point?’

He replied: ‘My lowest point was Christmas Day 2008, because I didn’t speak to my family. My walls were covered in scrawlings of the lyrics and cocaine bags nailed to the wall.

‘And I did have an experience where I was struggling to deal with being alone and being forsaken and being betrayed by putting your trust in one person, and making the mistake of that being the wrong person. And that’s a mistake that everyone can relate to. I made the mistake of trying to, desperately, grasp on and save that and own it. And every time I called her that day — I called 158 times — I took a razor blade and I cut myself on my face or on my hands.

‘I didn’t want people to ask me every time I did an interview, “Oh, is this record about your relationship with your ex-girlfriend?” But that damage is part of it, and the song “I Want to Kill You Like They Do in The Movies” is about my fantasies. 

‘I have fantasies every day about smashing her skull in with a sledgehammer.’  The interviewer replied: ‘Wow’. He replied: ‘Merry Christmas’. 

Manson and Wood got engaged after the interview and did not break up for another year after it took place.  

In November 2020, the comments resurfaced. Then, his reps played them down as him being a ‘theatrical rockstar’.

Around the same time, four other women posted similar statements on Instagram.

They are Ashley Walters, Sarah McNeilly, Ashley Lindsay Morgan and a woman who gave her name only as Gabriella. Two are models, one is a photographer who then worked as Manson’s assistant and the fourth is an artist. 

Not all of them gave dates for when they met Manson or how long they spent with him. They all allege a variety of misconduct and abuse by Manson including being subjected to ‘gaslighting and violence’. 

Some said he subjected them to sleep deprivation. McNeilly also claimed he ‘threatened to bash my face in with a baseball bat.’ 

It’s unclear why they all decided to speak out on Monday or if any of them have taken their claims to the police. 

Wood also posted screenshots of tweets written by Dan Cleary – Manson’s former assistant in December 2020. He said in them that he knew Wood when she was with Manson and that by the end of their relationship, he had ‘broken’ her.

Actress Rose McGowan, who was engaged to Marilyn Manson supports Evan Rachel Wood and the additional women who have accused the shock rocker of abuse.

Manson and McGowan dated in 1999, and became engaged before announcing their split in 2001. McGowan hasn’t publicly accused Manson of abuse during their relationship although the actress is a prominent #MeToo advocate and is supporting the women who’ve spoken out.

In a statement posted to Instagram, the ‘Charmed’ actress wrote: “My statement: I am profoundly sorry to those who have suffered the abuse & mental torture of Marilyn Manson. When I say Hollywood is a cult, I mean the Entertainment industry including the music industry is a cult. Cult’s protect the rot at the top.

Wood reconciled with English actor Jamie Bell after her romance with Manson ended in 2010. She and Bell had one son together before splitting in 2013. She then revealed she was bisexual and dating a non-binary partner in 2019, but she did not reveal who they were.

Evan Rachael Wood Names Marilyn Manson As Abuser

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Jazz Week,” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

BORN:

October 21, 1917
Cheraw, South Carolina


DIED:

January 6, 1993 (aged 75)


Englewood, New Jersey
MOVEMENT / STYLE

Bebop

Big Band Style

Jazz

AWARDS AND HONORS

Polar Music Prize (1993)

Grammy Award (1991)

Kennedy Center Honors (1990)

Grammy Award (1975)

Dizzy Gillespie, byname of John Birks Gillespie, (born October 21, 1917, Cheraw, South Carolina, U.S.—died January 6, 1993, Englewood, New Jersey), American jazz trumpeter, composer, and bandleader who was one of the seminal figures of the bebop movement.

Gillespie’s father was a bricklayer and amateur bandleader who introduced his son to the basics of several instruments. After his father died in 1927, Gillespie taught himself the trumpet and trombone; for two years he attended the Laurinburg Institute in North Carolina, where he played in the band and took music classes. His first professional job was in Frankie Fairfax’s band in Philadelphia; his early style showed the strong influences of his idol, trumpeter Roy Eldridge. Gillespie’s penchant for clowning and capriciousness earned him the nickname Dizzy. In 1937 he was hired for Eldridge’s former position in the Teddy Hill Orchestra and made his recording debut on Hill’s version of “King Porter Stomp.”

In the late 1930s and early ’40s, Gillespie played in a number of bands, including those led by Cab Calloway, Ella Fitzgerald, Earl Hines, Duke Ellington, and Billy Eckstine. He also took part in many late-night jam sessions at Minton’s Playhouse, a New York City nightclub, and was among the club’s regulars who pioneered the bebop sound and style (others included Charlie Parker, Charlie Christian, Thelonious Monk, and Max Roach). In 1944 the first bebop recording session included Gillespie’s “Woody ’n’ You” and featured Gillespie and Coleman Hawkins. Ultimately, Charlie Parker and Gillespie were regarded as cofounders of the bebop movement; the two worked together in several small groups in the 1940s and early ’50s. Although Parker was easily irritated by Gillespie’s onstage antics, their musical relationship seemed to benefit from their personal friction and their competitive solos were inventive, even inspired.

Gillespie formed his own orchestra in the late 1940s, and it was considered to be one of the finest large jazz ensembles. Noted for complex arrangements and instrumental virtuosity, its repertoire was divided between the bop approach—from such arrangers as Tadd Dameron, John Lewis, George Russell, and Gillespie himself—and Afro-Cuban jazz (or, as Gillespie called it, “Cubop”)—in such numbers as “Manteca,” “Cubano Be,” and “Cubano Bop,” featuring conga drummer Chano Pozo. Gillespie formed other bands sporadically throughout the remainder of his career, but he played mostly in small groups from the 1950s onward.

To many, Gillespie ranks as the greatest jazz trumpeter of all time, with the possible exception of Louis Armstrong. He took the saxophone-influenced lines of Roy Eldridge and executed them faster, with greater ease and harmonic daring, playing his jagged melodies with abandon, reaching into the highest registers of the trumpet range, and improvising into precarious situations from which he seemed always to extricate himself. Gillespie helped popularize the interval of the augmented eleventh (flat fifth) as a characteristic sound in modern jazz, and he used certain stock phrases in his improvisations that became clichés when two generations of jazz musicians incorporated them into their own solos. His late 1940s look—beret, hornrim glasses, and goatee—became the unofficial “bebop uniform” and a precursor to the beatnik styles of the 1950s. Other personal trademarks included his bent-bell trumpet and his enormous puffy cheeks that ballooned when playing. Gillespie was also a noted composer whose songbook is a list of bebop’s greatest hits; “Salt Peanuts,” “Woody ’n’ You,” “Con Alma,” “Groovin’ High,” “Blue ’n’ Boogie,” and “A Night in Tunisia” all became jazz standards.

Although his most innovative period was over by the end of the 1950s, Gillespie continued to perform at the highest level. During the 1970s he made several big band, small-group, and duet recordings (with such players as Oscar Peterson and Count Basie) that rank among his best work. As an active musical ambassador, Gillespie led several overseas tours sponsored by the U.S. State Department and traveled the world extensively, sharing his knowledge with younger players. During his last few years, he was the leader of the United Nations Orchestra, which featured such Gillespie protégés as Paquito D’Rivera and Arturo Sandoval. Gillespie’s memoirs, To Be, or Not…to Bop, were published in 1979.

Psychedelic Lunch