[Chuck Schuldiner] showed the foresight and courage to not only help create the rules of death metal, but to demonstrate how to break them. — Arthur von Nagel (Cormorant)

Charles Michael “Chuck” Schuldiner(May 13, 1967 – December 13, 2001) was an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist.

He founded the band Death in 1983 and was their lead vocalist until his death in 2001. His obituary in the January 5, 2002 issue of UK’s Kerrang!magazine said that “Chuck Schuldiner was one of the most significant figures in the history of metal.”

Schuldiner is referred to as “The Godfather of death metal”, although he was “uncomfortable” with this nickname, remarking that “I don’t think I should take the credits for this death metal stuff. I’m just a guy from a band, and I think Death is a metal band.”

Eighteen years ago this week, Schuldiner died after a two-year battle with brain cancer. To honor his legacy as a death metal pioneer, an inimitable vocalist and one of the best metal guitarists of all time heres a list of metal musicians writing about their favorite “Death” songs and what Schuldiner has meant to them.

Arthur von Nagel (Cormorant)

  • Zombie Ritual
  • from Scream Bloody Gore
  • by Death

I feel Chuck Schuldiner looked back on his ’80s albums with embarrassment. In interviews he dismissed the words to Scream Bloody Gore as childish blood ‘n’ guts fantasies, and the music as sloppy and poorly performed. He was right: The album’s lyrics are rife with slasher flick violence, misogyny, homophobia, and sexual aggression, traits which clashed with the narrative of self-discovery and acceptance he crafted around his later, more sophisticated works. The music, as exemplified by the pummeling “Zombie Ritual,” is gloriously raw, fast, and primitive (and ridiculously catchy). But for all the song’s Beavis and Butt-head-grade lyrics and flailing rhythms, Schuldiner had penned a powerful mission statement for all future death metal bands to follow. Chuck’s adolescent rage proved infectious, and perhaps in spite of themselves, Death and contemporaries Possessed spawned legions of imitators who solidified and improved upon the genre’s tropes.

But by the release of Human, Schuldiner wasn’t that angry teenager anymore. The most blatant evidence of his philosophical shift was Death’s logo, as Chuck famously cleaned up its cobwebs, mopped its the blood, banished the Reaper and righted the inverted crucifix. Some in the metal underground still view his embrace of progressive values (both musical and social) as a betrayal, a cop-out to political correctness and the same dreaded “artistic maturation” that had claimed Metallica. I can’t speak for Schuldiner’s motives for evolving his sound and image, but he placed himself in a unique historical position by having been one of the earliest codifiers of an orthodox death metal style, and then sacrilegiously expanding that very genre’s vocabulary by integrating elements of jazz fusion and progressive rock. Despite Chuck’s rug sweeping of his pubescent albums, to progress artistically demands a starting point to progress from. I firmly believe that every new Death album was a reaction to the last, and without a song like “Zombie Ritual” there could be no “The Philosopher.” It is precisely Schuldiner’s development as both a person and a musician that makes him so fascinating and divisive. He showed the foresight and courage to not only help create the rules of death metal, but to demonstrate how to break them. And there’s no shame in that.

Stephan Gebédi (Hail Of Bullets)

  • Infernal Death
  • from Scream Bloody Gore
  • by Death

At the age of 15, I got heavily into the tape trading thing. I was about to form my first band (Thanatos) and me and the drummer-to-be in that band were trading tapes with people all over the world. Most of those people were 15-16 years old as well and some of them had also just formed or were about to form bands of their own. Among our pen pals were people like Killjoy (Necrophagia), Ken Owen and Bill Steer (Carcass) and guys from Florida called Kam Lee and Chuck Schuldiner. They had this band called Mantas going, but were about to change their name to Death. We traded demo tapes and live tapes and even recordings of rehearsals. I clearly remember a rather f—- up recording of a song called “Rigor Mortis” done with a microphone and a tape recorder, which was obviously about to die any day now. You could hear the microphone falling over and being put back again … hilarious! But the music itself wasn’t hilarious at all! When their new three-song demo tape arrived in the mail one day, we all knew we were listening to something special; the first power chords of the opening track, “Infernal Death,” sounded so brutal, raw and evil that we stared at each other in disbelief. It was unlike anything we’ve ever heard before. Right there we witnessed the birth of death metal. Death went on and became a more technical band and broadened their horizon. I pretty much like all the albums they’ve made, but the sheer intensity of Scream Bloody Gore, which featured the aforementioned track in its full glory, has never been matched again.

“Death by Metal!”

Matt Harvey (Exhumed)

  • Left to Die
  • from Leprosy
  • by Death

Picking a favourite Death song is pretty tough. When I was first starting to play guitar, I learned the Scream Bloody Gore album from front to back and played along with it religiously. Once I heard Leprosy later that same year (I believe it was 1988, but it may have been early ’89), it was clear that the ante had been upped, not just in terms of Death’s catalog, but for the entire fledgling genre of death metal. I truly believe that Leprosy is the album that ushered in the genre as we recognize it today and as such, may be the most important album in death metal altogether. It was the first album to feature the distinct sonic components of what we now recognize as death metal. From the triggered drum sounds to the technical (especially for the time) minor/harmonic minor riffs, the tremolo picking, tapping parts, marginal presence of the bass guitar in the mix, and somewhat baroque arrangements, Leprosy has everything that defines the genre to this day. Where Scream Bloody Gore got by on attitude and rawness, Leprosy was a brilliant balance of sheer power and revealing detail. I devoured the songs on the record, and within a few weeks was playing along to it in its entirety as well. My favorite song tends to change depending on my mood (or how many beers I’ve had — give me a 12 pack and I’ll swear that “Beyond the Unholy Grave” is the best song ever), but if I had to pick one, I guess it would have to be “Left to Die.”

It is just chock-full of great riffs from beginning to end and features some of Chuck’s most inspired vocals. The opening scream at 0:24 oozes brutality, the seemingly off-the-cuff ejaculation of “On this f—— earth” at 2:04 gives the song a great dash of snarling attitude, and the grunt at 2:54 when the beat turns around personally synthesizes my own transformation from a thrash metaller to a death metal devotee. But there are still more vocal highlights: the scream at 3:13 may be the best death metal vocal ever recorded, surpassing even Jeff Becerra’s scream at the end of Possessed’s song, “Death Metal.” The final touch is the emphasis of the word “death” in the lyrics at 3:30, providing a nice, knowing wink at the audience. Again, the brilliance of this album is as much in its nuance as it is in its brute force.

As with most songs on the record, there are a lot of different riffs and tempos going on, presaging the hyper-ADD style arrangements that would become the norm in the genre in years to come. Luckily for a simple guy like me, the song still has a distinct structure — the same arrangement that figures heavily in most of Chuck’s songs: intro – verse – pre-chorus – chorus – bridge – lead – bridge –verse – pre-chorus – chorus – outro. Of course, some parts feature multiple riffs and time changes, but there is still a very coherent, recognizable structure to cling to in this song. The strangely modal intro riff is a harbinger of the scalar workouts that would figure so heavily in death metal’s transformation from a grime-covered sub-genre to a style obsessed with pushing the limits of instrumental technique, but the verse riff is the one that gets me. It’s a bludgeoning, hulking menace that throws its weight around with no regard for the listeners neck, which should immediately start whiplashing upon hearing it. The tremolo-picked chorus riff is also a bit more dissonant than most Death riffs, leaning heavily on a diminished pattern of D, F, A-flat, (which features prominently in about 99 percent of Exhumed songs) which is why it’s a favorite of mine. Chuck’s lead is, of course, tastefully dark with his trademark nervous vibrato heavily featured throughout, but in this song, I actually prefer the outro solo, a nice parting shot delivered by Rick “Rozz” Delilo, whose frenetic whammy bar abuse keeps the entire album from ever getting too melodic or anywhere near “pretty.” This is a truly great song on a truly classic, groundbreaking album. In fact, I’m almost convinced after writing this that it’s my all-time favorite Death song, but who knows, ask me again next week, and I may come up with 500 words describing why “Mutilation,” “Back from the Dead” or “Forgotten Past” is my favourite.

Paul Masvidal (Cynic)

  • Cosmic Sea
  • from Human
  • by Death

It’s difficult trying to articulate what it is about this instrumental Death song off Human — essentially arranged and written in the studio — that speaks to me. It doesn’t have Chuck’s voice in the literal sense, but it contains all the vital harmonic, melodic and rhythmic components that branded Death’s sound. But it also has something else. It’s reaching for truth, and it holds a majestic beauty that gave Death’s songs their greatest potency. What I’m remembering is the beginner mind approach in which this song took shape in the studio. It was driven by instinct and spontaneous creative freedom. Our collective energies united and we swam into the “Cosmic Sea,” trusting we wouldn’t need a life raft. Chuck’s story was liberated without words. “Cosmic Sea” is a journey straight into the heart of Death and, for me, an auditory memory of what an old friend felt like at his best.

Gene Hoglan (Fear Factory)

  • Flattening of Emotions
  • from Human
  • by Death

“Flattening of Emotions” from Human is an absolute masterpiece. From the “Hot for Teacher”-esque drum intro to the progressive approach of the opening bars of the song to the blistering salvos of double bass that pervade the entire composition, this tune achieves greatness as well as lays down the foundation for every Death song to have followed it. “Flattening of Emotions” is a benchmark, a performance pinnacle and furious mission statement; that death metal will no longer be relegated to mere brute strength, but will evolve past troglodytism into sublime art, where precision and passion will triumph over perfunctory extremism. With “Flattening of Emotions,” Death imposed its will on death metal, and secured its evolution. Death metal was given a choice: Adapt or Die. Adapt it did.

Richard Christy (Charred Walls Of The Damned)

  • Lack of Comprehension
  • from Human
  • by Death

I spent many Saturday nights in grade school and high school watching MTV’s Headbanger’s Ball. I was very fortunate that my parents had one of those old, massive, ugly giant satellite dishes that took up half our front yard and also made a great bird’s nest and lightning rod. Because we had MTV and also Canada’s Much Music channel since the early 1980s, I was able to discover many of my favorite bands through these TV channels, including Death. I remember the first time I saw the video for “Lack of Comprehension” and I was completely blown away. This song was the perfect mix of brutality and melody. Sean Reinert’s drumming also blew my mind. As a drummer, I was fascinated by his playing and I immediately wanted to learn more about Death. I also couldn’t believe that this song had brutal, guttural vocals, but was also very melodic and catchy — to me it sounded like the perfect mix of a band like Iron Maiden, and a band like Possessed. I immediately tried to learn the drum parts for this song and I have to humbly say that it took me about three years to do so.

Almost every day from the time I purchased the Human album in 1992 until I joined Death in 1997, I practiced drums to the Human album because I loved the music and drumming so much. Fortunately, when I auditioned for Death in July of 1997 I knew the Human album like the back of my hand and the first song Chuck Schuldiner and I played together was “Lack of Comprehension.” Chuck was very impressed that I knew the whole Human album and many other Death songs and this led to me joining my favorite band in the world and making friends with the most talented musician I’ve ever met and one of my heroes, Chuck Schuldiner. I miss Chuck so much and think of him every day and pretty much still listen to Death every day. When fans ask what drumming performance of mine that I’m most proud of, I always say The Sound of Perseverance album by Death. It is the highest honor as a metal fan and a dear friend of Chuck’s Schuldiner’s to say that I got to be in Death, my favorite band in the world.

John Dyer Baizley (Baroness)

  • Philosopher
  • from Individual Thought Patterns [Remixed, Remastered, Repackaged & Expanded]
  • by Death

Individual Thought Patterns is the masterpiece Death record for me. It’s the record where songwriting, production, lyrics, musicianship and hooks all converge to form a classic album. I remember being stuck in a tour van on some rural Eastern European road, and someone put the CD in the stereo. You can deny neither the skills nor the cohesion of the players on this record. Each musician is an institution unto himself, and this album goes right where so many sum-of-parts records go wrong. [Guitarist] Andy LaRoque’s surprising inclusion is a true stroke of genius. The real treat is that after an initial listen to such a progressive and technical record, I actually remembered most of the songs, most notably “The Philospher.” This was a death metal song that was instantly stuck in my head.

From the iconic opening guitar arpeggios, to the audible (!) groove of the bass line and one of the heaviest and most memorable choruses in the Death canon, this song hits every nail on the head. The guitar soloing is effortlessly fluid and melodic; and nothing negative ever needs to be said about Gene Hoglan’s acumen behind the kit.

Too often, the best you can hope for in metal lyricism is base comedy and adolescent sloganeering. Chuck stands apart as a lyricist in that he brazenly and unapologetically writes personal and insightful lyrics. While they may adhere to the tried-and-true vocal cadence of his peers, there is an openness and candor to them that is hard to deny. In “The Philosopher” he tackles subjects that fly in the face of the knuckle-dragging-Metal-orthodoxy, as he discusses and condemns narrow-minded bigotry and undue sexual judgementalism. His message, unlike so many of his contemporaries, is a universal and human message of tolerance, unadorned with the ignoble trappings generally associated with the genre.

Kevin Conway (East Of The Wall)

  • Overactive Imagination
  • from Individual Thought Patterns [Remixed, Remastered, Repackaged & Expanded]
  • by Death

As a middle-schooler who was acquainted with only the most obvious and basic metal staples, I had absolutely no frame of reference for what I was hearing the first time I heard Death’s “Overactive Imagination.” The level of technical precision was beyond anything I had ever heard, but the technicality wasn’t the entire story. The songs were structured in a way that was compelling, yet totally natural. It was everything I ever wanted to hear, but never knew existed. I would only get about six years of Death fandom before Chuck’s untimely demise. I would never get to see them live either. In spite of all that, there are very few bands that have shaped me as much as Death did, both as a musician and as a listener.

Elizabeth Schall (Dreaming Dead)

  • Crystal Mountain
  • from Symbolic
  • by Death

Symbolic is by far my most favorite Death album; mainly because of the higher pitched growls and the guitars having a more progressive approach than in previous releases. And 10 years after Chuck Schuldiner’s death, it is easy to say the legacy he left behind continues to influence musicians all over the world. But it wasn’t until the summer of 2009 when my appreciation of this album came full circle, when I met [former Death bassist] Kelly Conlon on tour with Monstrosity. We spoke of many things such as life and music; I shared pictures of my cats and he of his dog back on the East Coast that he missed and loved so much. Death not only left their music and a lasting impression on me, but also a great friend.

Anthony Buda (Revocation)

  • Without Judgement
  • from Symbolic
  • by Death

After first hearing the music of Death in my mid-teens, it didn’t take long for me to identify Chuck Shuldiner as a primary musical and creative role model. Touched by the power, energy and uniqueness of Death’s music in a way that I had never before experienced, it seemed an obvious and foregone conclusion to idolize “Evil” Chuck. And unlike the vast majority of his early death metal peers, Chuck was unafraid to go beyond the lyrical comfort zone of terror and malevolence.

The song “Without Judgment,” from Death’s masterful Symbolic, resonated strongly with me as a teenager not only for its awesome composition, arrangement and performances, but also because the lyrics stimulated my imagination and my desire to understand and integrate with the world around me. In the decade or so since first falling in love with the song, I have realized that its most significant impact has been to plant this seed of desire for understanding: “Without judgment what would we do? / Perception would increase a million times.” By accessing the non-judgmental, integrative awareness of our creative minds, temporarily silencing the persistent self-definition and differentiation of the ego, we gain a sense of the beautiful unity of existence. But, Chuck warns, the path to this level of awareness is not without its pitfalls: The only way out is down: “When pain is acknowledged, frivolous calculations will be abolished.”

Steffen Kummerer (Obscura)

  • Flesh and the Power It Holds
  • from Sound of Perseverance
  • by Death

“Flesh and the Power it Holds” was one of the first tracks I discovered of Death and actually the first song I was able to play on guitar. Pretty good choice, great songwriting and fantastic riffs that itches under your skin. While the whole last album is a classic, the earlier material such as Human got me and since the first listen I have been a fan. “Flesh and the Power it Holds” is a pretty long song, but it never gets boring; it keeps you listening from the first to the last note. Still one of my all time favourites.

11 metal musicians to pick their favorite Death song, and write what Chuck Schuldiner has meant to them

Debut EP “A Reptilian Dystopia” Out Jan 17, 2020

Fresh out of Stamford, Connecticut, USA, comes FROGG, a creative and modern blend of metal that is both dark and melodic. They are releasing their debut EP “A Reptilian Dystopia” on January 17, 2020 and ahead of that, are releasing the single ‘Ancient Rain’.

FROGG has been in the works for years in the mind of Sky Moon Clark and over the years he has been inoculating a stash of riffs, licks, and raw emotion, which will now be poured out into the world. As the band puts it, “it’s a fiery punch to the gut”.

The single ‘Ancient Rain’ is fast, technical and powerful with brutal riffs and malicious gutturals. One of the 4 punchy tracks that is just the beginning of what FROGG has to offer. Clark quotes about the future material FROGG intends to release:

“Our EP is kind of our raw sound put on a plate without much refinement, but it’s still the basic punch and flavour FROGG has to offer. Just think of the EP as our base, while our in-the-works Album I (expected 2021/2022) will be a more fleshed out form of FROGG with an emphasized focus on the overall songs start to finish.”

Metal fans looking for something new and creative, especially fans of Obscura, Arsis and Born of Osiriswill be able to appreciate FROGG and “A Reptilian Dystopia”.

Listen to ‘Ancient Rain’ via The CirclePit‘s YouTube channel here.


EP Pre-order here.

Track Listing:
1. Ancient Rain (3:23)
2. Nuclear Storm (2:05)
3. DNA (7:29)
4. Ranidaphobia (3:47)
EP Length: 16:45
For more info:
Facebook.com/Froggband
Instagram @ Froggband
Twitter @OfficialFrogg
EPK

About:

FROGG is a modern technical metal band located in Stamford, USA with influences stemming from Obscura, Arsis, and Born of Osiris.

The concept behind FROGG is simple: create modern heavy music while striving to show off some originality in an often, over-processed genre. FROGG’s main ambition is to hit the live circuit in NYC and its surroundings with a perfected performance and bolstered line-up.

FROGG started as your typical high school band with founder Sky Moon Clark and co-founder at the time, Ryan Panny blasting off primarily Children of Bodom covers for fun. FROGG was later revitalized by Clark, during his time at Berklee College of Music.

Through his time at Berklee, Clark experimented with different projects while continuing to funnel different guitar-centric song ideas and riffs into the archives that would later come to fruition with the next reincarnation of FROGG.

In 2019, the overstocked stash of riffs, licks, and raw emotion was ready to be poured out into the world what was a one-man project bloomed with the addition of Siebe Sol Sijpkens (bass); Anthony Barrone (drums) and Liam Zintz-Kunkel (rhythm guitars) to record the first EP.

With performance in mind, FROGG delivers an authentic live sound with no backup tracks, just raw, practiced musicianship. The dark and melodic band promises something hot, original and intense and the debut album “A Reptilian Dystopia” is slated for release in 2020.

Introducing Connecticut’s FROGG And Their Reptilian Dystopia With Single “Ancient Rain”

OGDEN — An Ogden legend died Saturday.

Joe McQueen, pioneering jazz saxophonist and Northern Utah resident, died Saturday morning at the age of 100.

Fellow jazz musician Brad Wheeler said in a Facebook post Saturday afternoon that McQueen, his close personal friend and fellow musician, died at 10:20 a.m. Saturday.

“He has been living his whole life for this day,” Wheeler wrote in the post. “He told me to tell everyone not to cry for him, that when you think about him to think about all of the blessings he had received, and know that he had lived a full and meaningful life.”

Lars Yorgason, an Ogden resident and bass player, told the Standard-Examiner that McQueen was a wonderful person, and he’s considered himself lucky to call McQueen a friend.

“He was a very honest, honorable person,” Yorgason said. “I think the world should know that. I’m grateful I was his friend.”

Yorgason played with McQueen since 1977, when he moved back to Ogden. He described McQueen as a leader for desegregating Ogden establishments, telling club owners that he wouldn’t play at their establishments unless they allowed people of all colors inside.

“He was a force in getting establishments to reduce and eliminate segregation in Ogden,” Yorgason said. “He really enjoyed being in Ogden.”

McQueen was described as a tender, kind and strong man, according to Ryan Conger, an organist who played for years with Joe as part of his quartet.

Conger, who said he’s known McQueen for about eight or nine years, was always amazed at what the saxophonist could do, even in his older years. Conger recalled a piano teacher he had at Utah State University who would sit in on jam sessions where others could join in. It was competitive, and the teacher was always intimidated when trying to keep up with McQueen.

Conger would later share in that experience when he, too, would play with McQueen. His speed and expertise in music could be seen well into his later years.

“Mere mortals could hardly keep up with him back in the day,” Conger said. “It was one of those experiences that left you in awe.”

McQueen was much more than just a musician, said Conger, as he was known for his strength and passion for helping others. After McQueen retired in his 80s, Conger said McQueen would spend 40 hours a week driving seniors to doctor’s appointments, pharmacies and anywhere else they needed to go.

“It’s hard to imagine all he did for this community,” Conger said. “That was just Joe, he was tough as nails but always cared about others. He was the kind of guy you wanted to be.”

McQueen was born May 30, 1919, in Ponder, Texas, and was raised by his grandmother in Ardmore, Oklahoma, according to previous Standard-Examiner reporting.

He began playing the saxophone as a teenager, eventually touring the country with jazz bands. In late 1945 McQueen and his new bride, Thelma, were traveling with a band when they made a stop in Ogden. While here, another member of the band stole the group’s money and left town. The couple decided to stay and make a home here.

McQueen became a fixture in the local music scene, playing with many of the big jazz names coming through town — Charlie Parker, Chet Baker, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie. He also toured on and off throughout the West.

Through the years, McQueen toured across the country but always remained true to Ogden.

Earlier this year on June 1, dozens gathered at Ogden’s Second Baptist Church to celebrate McQueen’s 100th birthday.

Speaker after speaker noted McQueen is an inspiration for more than just his music. They praised McQueen for breaking barriers during segregation, playing in any clubs he could, and helping generations of younger musicians learn how to play and be good people.

In anticipation for his centennial birthday, the Utah Legislature passed House Concurrent Resolution 12, which honored the jazz legend’s birthday. The musician also received a brand new saxophone from the Sandy-based company Cannonball Musical Instruments.

Ogden Jazz Legend Joe McQueen Dies Saturday At The Age Of 100

JUDAS PRIEST has uploaded a new video touting the band’s nomination for the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame. The 95-second clip contains some of PRIEST‘s best-known songs and includes facts about the group’s 50-year career, such as crediting the British heavy metal legends with “revolutionaliz[ing] heavy metal fashion and cultural dress by introducing the leather-and-studs look” and “pioneer[ing] modern metal and continu[ing] to reshape heavy metal today.”

Having been eligible for induction since 1999, JUDAS PRIEST was on the ballot for last year’s class of the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, but ultimately didn’t clinch the nomination.

This past October, it was announced that JUDAS PRIESTis among the nominees for the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame‘s class of 2020. The top vote-getters will be announced in January and inducted May 2, 2020 at a ceremony at Cleveland’s Public Hall.

A voter pool of more than 1,000 artists, historians, journalists and members of the music industry will select the new class. Fans will also have a chance to take part in the process by voting at RockHall.com or an interactive kiosk at the museum in Cleveland.

Rob HalfordLes BinksK.K. DowningIan HillDave HollandGlenn Tipton and Scott Travis are on the ballot for JUDAS PRIEST.

Speaking to Ultimate Classic RockHalford said about the prospect of PRIEST finally getting the nod: “It would be wonderful [to be inducted]. I think it’s one of the greatest accolades you can be given, because you’re in the company of musical giants.

“When we were first nominated, I kind of went crazy and I was texting my friends and [sending] e-mails and going, ‘You’ve got to vote! You’ve got to vote!” he recalled. “And then we didn’t get in. I was disappointed. But it is what it is. This time, I haven’t really been checking the voting that much, but apparently, we’re in the Top 5 right now, for the fan votes. Which speaks volumes about our wonderful fans around the world that are voting every day.”

Downing, who left the band acrimoniously eight years ago, told BlastEcho in a 2016 interview that he “would be fine” with performing with his former bandmates at the Rock Hall induction ceremony if they were to ever receive the honor. Halford was also open to the idea of reuniting with Downing on the night, telling Billboard in 2017: “Everything’s on the table for anyone that’s been associated with PRIEST in and out of the band.” 

To be eligible for this year’s ballot, each nominee’s first single or album had to be released in 1994 or earlier.

Why Judas Priest Deserves To Be Inducted Into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

NEWS RELEASE

Montreal, QC – December 2019

 
Band Submissions Deadline Extended – WACKEN METAL BATTLE USA 2020

Applications for 2020 will end on December 15, 2019 at 11:59 PM PST.

Great News Bands! Because Tampa Bay and New Orleans were added with less time to Wacken Metal Battle USA, 
they’re giving more time for bands to apply on all cities until Dec 15th, 11:59 pm EST

Apply at this link: https://metalbattleusa.com/apply/

Unsigned bands can ONLY apply!

These cities/areas are participating! More to be announced!
Phoenix, AZ, Tucson, AZ, Inland Empire, CA, Los Angeles, CA, Oakland, CA
Sacramento, CA, San Diego, CA, San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, New Orleans, LA
Las Vegas, NV, New York City, NY, Portland, OR, Austin, TX, Fort Worth, TX
San Antonio, TX, Houston, TX, Seattle, WA, Tampa Bay, FL

W:O:A Metal Battle – Official Trailer here.

Wacken Metal Battle USA 2019 Spotify Playlist here.

For over a decade at the world’s largest outdoor metal festival Wacken Open Air, independent metal bands from around the globe have been performing in front of thousands and competing against one another for one to be crowned champion of the world along with winning multiple prizes. For the fourth year, Wacken Metal Battle USA is returning to America and will be hosting qualifying rounds in select cities across the nation. The national champion of those battles will perform at 31st edition of the festival taking place from July 30th – August 1st, 2020 in Wacken, Germany. The sold-out 2020 Wacken Open Air line-up includes Judas PriestMercyful FateAmon Amarth, Sodom, Annihilator, Overkill, Venom, Sick of It All, Nervosa, U.D.O., Hypocrisy, Death Angel, Beast In Black, At The Gates and many more. Details here.

Wacken Metal Battle USA is part of an international competition that sees bands from across the country battle each other for the chance of winning their spot among 29 other countries’ champions, and representing the USA in an international battle of the bands at the world’s largest outdoor metal festival: Wacken Open Air, which has been taking place in Wacken, Germany for the last 30 years. The winner of Wacken Metal Battle USA will perform at the 2020 festival taking place from July 30th – August 1st.

2020 battles will be held in Phoenix, AZ, Tucson, AZ, Inland Empire, CA, Los Angeles, CA, Oakland, CA, Sacramento, CA, San Diego, CA, San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, New Orleans, LA, Las Vegas, NV, New York City, NY, Portland, OR, Austin, TX, Fort Worth, TX, San Antonio, TX, Houston, TX, Seattle, WA, and Tampa Bay, FL.

Concert promoters interested in hosting a Wacken battle in their city can apply at this link: https://metalbattleusa.com/promoter-application-for-wacken-metal-usa-battles/

How it works:

Participating cities will host qualifying rounds plus a city final organized by a local city concert promoter where one band will move forward to the American national final (date and city to be determined). The winner of the national final will move on to perform at the 31st edition of Wacken Open Air and compete against the winners of 29 other countries in a final global battle.  All bands will be judged during battle rounds by respected local music industry representatives.

Rules: https://metalbattleusa.com/rules/

Last year’s 2019 national final was hosted in Los Angeles, CA and featured Dissentience (Winners, East Coast), Monarch (Winners, West Coast), Nahaya (Winners, Texas), Toxic Ruin (Winners, Chicago), Violence System (Winners, Atlanta) whom were selected from over a hundred bands that participated in battles across the USA.

2019 – WMBU Winner
Monarch (San Diego, CA)
Video – Live at Wacken 2019 here.

2018 – WMBU Winner
VOICES OF RUIN (Anaheim, CA)

2017 – WMBU Winner
CORPSE HOARDER (Philadelphia, PA)Video – Live at Wacken 2017 here.

For more info:
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Facebook.com/MetalBattleUSA 
Instagram.com/MetalBattleUSA
Twitter.com/MetalBattleUSA 
Wacken Open Air – Wacken.com

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Saint Vitus

Wacken Open Air Metal Battle USA 2020 Band Submissions Has Been Extended Until December 15th

The mighty Slayer played the final show of what’s being billed as their farewell tour in Inglewood, CA at the Forum on Saturday night November 30th. The band has been on this farewell run since last year and they’ve been making their way through the States all last month.

Tom Araya said “Thank you. Thank you very much,” at the end of their final song. “I want to thank you for sharing your time with us. Time is precious. So I thank you for sharing that time with us, thank you. I’m gonna miss you guys. But the most important thing I want to thank you for being a part of my life, thank you. Good night. You guys be safe.” Watch fan-filmed footage of the performance below

Slayer “The Final Show” Set List Nov. 30, 2019 The Forum, Inglewood, California

1. South of Heaven
2. Repentless
3. Post Mortem
4. World Painted Blood
5. Hate Worldwide
6. War Ensemble
7. Stain of Mind
8. Disciple
9. When the Stillness Comes
10. Born of Fire
11. Payback
12. Seasons in the Abyss
13. Jesus Saves
14. Chemical Warfare
15. Hell Awaits
16. Dead Skin Mask
17. Show No Mercy
18. Raining Blood
19. Mandatory Suicide
20. Angel of Death

Watch Slayer Play Their Final Farewell Concert

Formed in 1995, American heavy metal legends Slipknot have just shared a statement about the canceled Knotfest Mexico. Because of a broken barricade and failed attempts to fix it, Slipknot were forced to cancel the shows last night.

Here’s the statement Slipknot shared:

“Because of a broken barricade and failed attempts to fix it, Slipknot were forced to cancel our performance last night. Safety – especially the safety of our fans and fellow bands – is priority number one. We apologize profusely and hope you all understand. If anything were to happen to any of you, we wouldn’t forgive ourselves. Also, If we could have fixed the barricade correctly, we would have gone on stage. Again, we hope you all understand and we will try to make it up to you as soon as we can.”

Also, Evanescence have shared a statement about the canceled show and gave a promise to fans. Here’s the Evanescence’s statement:

“We are heartbroken we didn’t get to play for you tonight, México City. Your safety, your life is more important than any show! We love you and we will be back soon, that’s a promise.”

Knotfest Show in Mexico Cancelled Due To Broken Barricade. Fans Storm Stage And Destroy Equipment