IGGY POP Releases Music Video For ‘We Are The People’

Iggy Pop has unveiled a striking and spare new video for “We Are The People” from his critically lauded album “Free” (Loma Vista Recordings). In the wake of last week’s live rendition of the song by Iggy accompanied by Laurie Anderson at Carnegie Hall, the “We Are The People” clip imbues Iggy‘s interpretation of a poem written by Lou Reed in 1970 with a riveting new visual dimension. From the opening lines “We are the people without land. We are the people without tradition. We are the people who do not know how to die peacefully and at ease” to the song’s slow fade, the effect of Iggy‘s close-up recitation is transfixing.

On Saturday, March 7 at Perrotin in New York City, Iggywill release a limited, numbered vinyl “test pressing” release of “Free”, featuring cover art and creative collaboration with Maurizio CattelanIggy Pop and Maurizio Cattelan will sign copies of this special “test pressing” vinyl which has been made available in 340 numbered units worldwide, including a bonus seven-inch single featuring two unreleased tracks exclusive to this special artistic collaboration: Iggy‘s a cappella rendition of “Brahms Lullaby” and “Epistle to Tromba”, a heartfelt ode to a late canine companion. Each copy of this numbered edition of 340 will be enclosed in a resealable Japanese polybag. Concurrently, Perrotin is excited to present books and merchandise spanning Maurizio Cattelan‘s career, as well as a series of historic fine art prints of Iggy Pop, courtesy of the Morrison Gallery.

The limited-edition version of “Free” is available for purchase commencing at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 7, while the signing will begin at 1 p.m. Perrotin is located at 130 Orchard Street in New York.

“Free” was originally released September 13, 2019 by Loma Vista Recordings. Featuring collaborators Leron Thomas (trumpet/keys/songwriting) and Noveller(guitar/vocals), the album holds a singular place in Iggy‘s canon — and has generated suitably unique praise: The New York Times called the title track “atmospheric and elusive” and praised the song “Sonali”as “a rushing, fluttering, quasi-waltz that hurries toward an undisclosed destination, whimsical but driven.” Rolling Stone regaled Iggy‘s performance on the new record, “Pop flexes his baritone, expressing himself more clearly than perhaps ever before.” And The Washington Post noted “Iggy haunts these new songs like a dignified spirit — which might make ‘Free’ an exposition on death, or transcendence, or both.”

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Iggy Pop, The Idiot: March 18, 1977

The Idiot is the debut solo album by American musician Iggy Pop, released on March 18, 1977 by RCA Records. It was the first of two albums that Pop wrote and recorded in collaboration with David Bowie, who is credited as producer. The sessions for the album began before the recording of Bowie’s 1977 album Low; as a result, The Idiot has been called the unofficial beginning of Bowie’s Berlin period.

Described by Pop as “a cross between James Brown and Kraftwerk,” The Idiot marked a departure from the guitar-based proto-punk of his former band the Stooges, and has been compared with Bowie’s “Berlin Trilogy” of albums in its electronic Described by Pop as “a cross between James Brown and Kraftwerk,” The Idiot marked a departure from the guitar-based proto-punk of his former band the Stooges, and has been compared with Bowie’s “Berlin Trilogy” of albums in its electronic sounds and introspective atmosphere. Its title was taken from Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel of the same title, three of the participants in the recording — Bowie, Pop, and Tony Visconti — being familiar with the book. sounds and introspective atmosphere. Its title was taken from Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel of the same title, three of the participants in the recording — Bowie, Pop, and Tony Visconti — being familiar with the book.

Psychedelic Lunch

Written By Braddon S. Williams

Iggy Pop: Brick By Brick

Iggy Pop released Brick By Brick in 1990 and it is a fun album full of great songs and some strategically placed guest stars. The song Candy is a duet with Kate Pierson of the B-52’s, and a video was filmed for MTV, providing Iggy with his first big video hit.

Pierson’s voice blends spectacularly well with Iggy’s baritone croon, making for one of my all time favorite duets.

Slash and Duff McKagan from Guns ‘n Roses (along with super drummer Kenny Aronoff) kicked off the album with the ferociously rocking Home.

Iggy himself contributed most of the rhythm guitar on the album, and Home sounds like it was recorded live in a single take.

The title song is primarily acoustic guitar and some orchestration accompanying Iggy’s passionate vocal.

Don Was produced Brick By Brick and did an outstanding job with a stark, in your face raw feel to most of the material, suitable to Iggy Pop’s rightful claim as the Godfather Of Punk.

https://youtu.be/0A9binTPMKU

Influences And Recollections of a Musical Mind

On this date in history, 6/7/1997, Deer Creek hosted the R.O.A.R. Festival. Those letters stood for something, but I can’t recall what, and I haven’t been able to find any mention of it anywhere.

What is truly important is that the concert featured Iggy Pop, Sponge, Reverend Horton Heat, Tonic, Linda Perry, and Bloodhound Gang.

I believe it was meant to become a yearly festival in the same spirit as Lollapalooza, but it apparently didn’t make enough money for the investors to bring it back. Bloodhound Gang had a sort of novelty song that was getting airplay at the time and they played with spirit and energy. 

I remember their bass player walking out into pavilion seating with his wireless rig, but not much else really stood out for me.

Linda Perry had sung for 4 Non Blondes and she was okay, but nothing exceptional. Same thing for Tonic; well played but rather boring alternative rock.

The concert finally got interesting when Reverend Horton Heat took the stage and lit it up with their frantic psychobilly attack, proving that ZZ Top isn’t the only kickass trio from Texas.

Sponge were up next, bringing their Detroit rock into the mix. They were excellent and proved a suitable warmup for the main attraction, also from Michigan, the legendary Iggy Pop.

sr-ryl-randallsisland-iggydanceIggy hit the stage like a whirlwind, clad in skin tight sparkling pink pants and no shirt. One of his arms was in a sling, due to a stage diving incident at the previous tour stop. Even one armed, Iggy was a man possessed, twirling and bouncing his way around the stage, a human energizer bunny.

After the first song was over and midway into the next, he took off the sling and 3494went absolutely bonkers, but a roadie managed to catch hold of him and quickly wrapped the injured arm up and secured it to Iggy’s body.

The band slammed through classic solo material like “Lust For Life” and tossed in a couple of songs from The Stooges for good measure. I yelled “Iggy, Iggy” until I nearly lost my voice as the crowd and I roared our approval of the main attraction of the first and only R.O.A.R. Festival. Iggy Rules!

Written By Braddon S. Williams aka The Concert Critic

On This Date in History