California’s Thanatopsis have unleashed the new single “Consequence”, off their upcoming debut album “Initiation” due out October 23, 2020 via Extreme Metal Music to follow their four independently released demos between 1993-1997.

The band comments about the song:

“‘Consequence’ is one of the newer songs that was written for the ‘Initiation’ album. ‘Consequence’ is basically about the uprising of the common man against population control perpetrated by the ruling class and the subsequent formation of an underground resistance. The epic nature, aggressiveness, and twists in this song make for a listening experience that we believe will resonate with our audience.”

Listen to “Consequence” on YouTube, Spotify.

After a hiatus, 3/4 of the band has reunited along with the new addition of drummer Jason Borton (Jungle Rot, Arkaik) to offer their debut full-length, which features past recordings that are given a second life and a chance to be heard by a broader audience along with new unheard material. The album was recorded at Trident Studios with renowned producer Juan Urteaga (Exodus, Testament, Machine Head).

The overall album experience shares eight old school thrash/death metal influenced tracks that are an emotionally twisted ride of violently catchy brutality. With themes that include corruption, occultism, murder, revolt, and loss of faith, Thanatopsis delivers an album that keeps the listener engaged from start to finish, with a sound unlike any other.

The band comments:

“It has been a long time in the making and we are very excited to present to the world the first official full-length Thanatopsis album “Initiation”. This album contains timeless songs that fans, both old and new, will appreciate. Bringing our sound to the masses has been a collective dream of ours for a long time. In a scene that is saturated with bands, we are proud to release something that is unique in character to the metal world at large.”

“Initiation” album pre-order CD here, Digital here.

First single:
“Embodiment” on YouTube, Spotify.

Track Listing:
1. The Age of Silence (4:26)
2. Embodiment (3:06)
3. Consequence (5:17)
4. Malfated (5:17)
5. Initiation (5:17)
6. Your Demise (5:17)
7. Grim (3:33)
8. Suffer System (4:21)
Album Length: 36:32

Album Credits:
Produced, Mixed, and Mastered by Juan J. Urteaga at Trident Studios, Pacheco, CA, Co-Produced by David A. Couch
Artwork by Matt Cavotta
Layout by Arturo Hernandez
Art Concepts and Direction by David A. Couch
Thanatopsis logo by Brutal Disorder

John Bishop – Vocals
David A. Couch – Guitars
Thom Hall – Bass
Jason Borton – Drums

Additional vocals by Juan J. Urteaga 
Drums, Bass, and Vocals recorded at Trident Studios, Pacheco, CA
Guitars recorded at Metal Command Center, Parker, CO


More info:
Extremetalmusic.com
Thechaoticorder.com
Facebook.com/MalfatedOne
Instagram.com/thanatopsis666

“This new song definitely has a strong and very tasty old-school flavor.It’s a sinister, high-octane death metal rush right out of the gate, but the song really reaches escape velocity at about the 2:00 mark when guitarist David Couch launches a jaw-dropping guitar solo over a memorable melody. – No Clean Singing (Reviewing the song “Your Demise”)

Extreme Metal: Thanatopsis Streaming New Single “Consequence” Off Upcoming Album “Initiation”

New Album “Question Everything” Out October 5th (North America) (Saibot Reigns), October 28th (Japan) (Ward Records)

L-R – Alex Bosson – Drums, Mary Zimmer – Vocals, Jason Ashcraft – Guitar, Chad Anderson – Guitar, Jeremy Steinhouse – Bass
Photo Credit: Casey Frederick

Helion Prime have released a new lyric video for the fourth single “Photo 51” off of their upcoming album “Question Everything” due out on October 5th in North America along with Europe via their label Saibot Reigns and October 28th in Japan via Ward Records. The Japanese CD version will feature two exclusive bonus tracks “Prof (Demo)” and “Rain (Trivium Cover)” (track listing below) and is available for pre-order HERE. The North American/EU pre-order at Helionprimemetal.com.

The band comments on “Photo 51”:

“We are very happy to release the final single for our album “Question Everything”, which comes out one week from today! This song is called “Photo 51” and based on…Photo 51! The first photograph of DNA. This song is a favorite among the band from the new album and those who have heard it seem to claim it as a favorite as well! It might just become a new staple in our live sets! We hope you enjoy Photo 51! And thank you to Scott Kennedy from 12 Inch Media for creating it.”

Watch and listen to “Photo 51” HERE.

It’s been about two years since the band’s sophomore release “Terror of the Cybernetic Space Monster” and Sacramento sci-fi power metallers Helion Prime returns with their third effort and the much shorter title “Question Everything” set for release on Monday, October 5th, 2020 via their label Saibot Reigns.  This is Helion Prime‘s first album with new vocalist Mary Zimmer, who has also accompanied the band on two separate tours of the United States. It also sees the band’s original singer, Heather Michele, returning in a writing capacity and contributing all lyrics and melodies. Heather Michele also along with other former Helion Prime vocalist Sozos Michael and with John Yelland (Judicator/Dire Peril) add their guest vocals on the full length.

The highly anticipated third record is a concept album, with each song revolving around different figures throughout human history that had the courage to question the status quo of their respective worlds/societies, in some cases even dealing with harsh persecution as a result. Those Helion Prime chose to write about-faced prejudice, mockery, ex-communication, and persecution – yet through it all, they held true to their beliefs and ideas. Time would be their greatest ally as their ideas and identities were eventually validated, oftentimes not until after their passing. They serve as an inspiration for all minds to continue thinking outside the box and staying true to themselves.

Jason speaks on the album itself:

“This album has truly been amazing to work on. The idea behind it is something I’ve been holding on to since around the time I started the band. Aside from writing some of what I consider to be Prime’s best work it was a great experience getting to work with Heather again on an album as she once again contributed her talents for the lyrics.”

“Question Everything” was produced by Jason Ashcraft and Alex Nasla. Mixing was done by Chris Collier and mastered by Brett Caldas-Lima along with additional mixing/drum edits/reamping plus writing and performance of keyboard arrangements by Alex Nasla of Gear Gods Studio. Guitar/Bass edits by Michael Goodrich and cover art by Marc Whisnant.

Previous singles:
“The Forbidden Zone” YouTube (Lyric Video), Spotify.
“Madame Mercury” Youtube (Lyric Video), Spotify.
“Gadfly” YouTube (Music Video)

Track Listing:
1. The Final Theory
2. Madame Mercury
3. Prof
4. The Gadfly
5. Photo 51
6. E Pur Si Muove
7. Words of The Abbot ft. guest vocals John Yelland (Judicator, Dire Peril)
8. The Forbidden Zone
9. Question Everything ft. Heather Michele (ex-Graveshadow, ex-Helion Prime) and Sozos Michael (ex-Helion Prime, Planeswalker)
10. Reawakening
11. Kong at the Gates (Misfits Cover)

– Japanese Edition Limited Bonus Tracks –
12. Prof (Demo)
13. Rain (Trivium Cover)

Helion Prime is:
Mary Zimmer – Vocals
Jason Ashcraft – Rhythm Guitars
Chad Anderson – Lead Guitars
Jeremy Steinhouse – Bass
Alex Bosson – DrumsFor more info:
Helionprimemetal.com
Facebook.com/helionprimemetal
Instagram.com/helionprimemetal
EPK

It’s All In The DNA With Helion Prime’s New Lyric Video “Photo 51”

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series,where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Temptation Eyes By the GrassRoots, Album: More Golden Grass (1970)

Written by Dan Walsh and Harvey Price, this is the favorite of all the songs that they have written. In addition, lead singer Rob Grill describes it as his “all-time favorite Grass Roots song.” It’s about a temptress who drives the singer wild, even though he can’t have her for himself.

On December 20th 1970, “Temptation Eyes” by the Grass Roots entered Billboard’s Hot Top 100 chart at position #68; and fourteen weeks later on March 28th, 1971 it peaked at #15 {for 1 week} and spent 18 weeks on the Top 100…
Between 1966 and 1976 the Los Angeles-based quartet had twenty-one Top 100 records; three made the Top 10, “Let’s Live for Today” {#8 in 1967}, “Midnight Confessions” {#5 in 1968}, “Sooner or Later” {#9 in 1971}…
Bassist and lead singer “Rob” Grill passed away on July 11th, 2011 at the age of 67…
May he R.I.P.

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Credit: BBC

Rare footage of David Bowie’s first ever TV performance as Ziggy Stardust has been unearthed. 

“I wasn’t at all surprised ‘Ziggy Stardust’ made my career,” Bowie once said of his fictional character. “I packaged a totally credible plastic rock star.” That rock and roll hero, who would go on to change the game of music, solidifying Bowie as a bonafide icon. Here, in footage which was once thought to have been deleted and lost forever, Bowie’s performs on ‘Top of the Pops’ way back in 1972.

The clip, shot by a fan on a home camcorder, has been described as the “Holy Grail” and will appeared in the recently released BBC documentary David Bowie: The First Five Years – Finding Fame

“For fans, it is something of a Holy Grail,” documentary director Francis Whately told the Radio Times.”It would fall apart if we played it, so it’s had to be very carefully restored. It will be a real coup if it comes off.”

The restoration of the tape is being carefully dealt with by specialists but a BBC spokeswoman said: “The footage has only very recently been discovered. We’re hoping it will be ready in time to include in the film.” Apparently, the clip was once part of 144 tapes sent by Granada Television in a bid to turn them into digital. However, a catastrophic error made by a technician saw the footage accidentally deleted. 

“I was absolutely gobsmacked,” Marc Riley once told Bowie biographer David Buckley. “My gran was shouting insults at the TV, which she usually saved for Labour Party political broadcasts. And I just sat there agog. I was experiencing a life-changing moment. I know it sounds ridiculous, but it really did knock me for six.”

Ziggy Stardust is one of the lasting images of the late, great musician and performer David Bowie. The persona was a defining moment in Bowie’s career and his miraculous conception of the flame-haired rock and roller from outer space was the toast of the music industry.

Bowie, previously discussing his unstoppable creativity energy, once confessed: “I get bored very quickly and that would give it some new energy. I’m rather kind of old school, thinking that when an artist does his work it’s no longer his… I just see what people make of it. That is why the TV production of Ziggy will have to exceed people’s expectations of what they thought Ziggy was.”

Discussing the inception of Ziggy Stardust, Bowie once explained: “The time is five years to go before the end of the earth,” he said, relishing telling his story. “It has been announced that the world will end because of lack of natural resources. [The album was released three years prior to the original interview.] Ziggy is in a position where all the kids have access to things that they thought they wanted. The older people have lost all touch with reality and the kids are left on their own to plunder anything.

“Ziggy was in a rock and roll band and the kids no longer want rock and roll. There’s no electricity to play it. Ziggy’s adviser tells him to collect news and sing it, ’cause there is no news. So Ziggy does this and there is terrible news. ‘All the Young Dudes’ is a song about this news. It is no hymn to the youth as people thought. It is completely the opposite.”

Bowie continues to go into depth about the conception of the persona: “Ziggy is advised in a dream by the infinites to write the coming of a starman, so he writes ‘Starman,’ which is the first news of hope that the people have heard. So they latch onto it immediately. The starmen that he is talking about are called the infinites, and they are black-hole jumpers.”

See Bowie outing Ziggy Stardust for one of the very first times, below.

Rare footage of David Bowie’s first performance as Ziggy Stardust

THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA‘s Max Moore-directed music video for the song “The Thread” can be seen below. The track is taken from the band’s latest album, “The Act”, which was made available in October 2019 via Solid State Records.

The members of THE DEVIL WEARS PRADAconsistently choose to both challenge themselves and the world around them. The group — Mike Hranica (vocals), Jeremy DePoyster (vocals, guitar), Andy Trick (bass), Kyle Sipress (guitar), Jonathan Gering (keys, synthesizers) and Giuseppe Capolupo (drums) — bends and breaks all boundaries on its seventh full-length and debut for Solid State Records. Pulling plain-spoken poetry through distorted discord and dissonance, the six-piece delivers a dynamic and definitive statement.

Regarding the album, Hranica said: “‘The Act’ is our seventh full-length and the most detailed effort of our career. The process was scrupulous in every facet. Jon, who’s played keyboard with the band for the last seven or eight years, produced the album; which is a decision that’s insurmountably snowballed over the past few releases. There is no common theme surrounding every song on the record, although there are notions that inhale and exhale through the LP’s timeline.”

“This just feels very make it, or break it for us,” added Hranica. “All bets are in on ‘The Act’. We tried to make something outside of the norm for rock, metalcore, or heavy music. We often hear commentary that ‘rock is dead’ now; I don’t think it has to be that way though. Look at the corners pop and hip-hop turn. Artists just need to reinvent themselves and make something creative and inventive again. Reinvention is what we’re driving towards.”

THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA Releases ‘The Thread’ Music Video

The Doobie Brothers want actor Bill Murray to pay for using the band’s song in commercials for his golf shirts.

The Doobie Brothers claim actor Bill Murray has been using one of their songs without permission to sell “ugly” golf shirts and they want the actor to pay up.In a Wednesday letter to Murray and William Murray Golf — owned by the actor and his brothers — the band’s attorney, Peter Paterno, accused the company and the actor of using the band’s song “Listen to the Music” in commercials for the company’s “Zero Hucks Given” golf shirts.”However, given that you haven’t paid to use it, maybe you should change the company name to ‘Zero Bucks Given,'” the letter reads.

The letter goes on to cite the US Copyright Act, and says Murray should “already know you can’t use music in ads without paying for it.”It concludes with: “We’d almost be OK with it if the shirts weren’t so damn ugly. But it is what it is. So in the immortal words of Jean Paul Sartre, ‘Au revoir Golfer. Et payez!'”Bill Murray’s representatives have not yet returned CNN’s request for comment.

Murray and his brothers launched their company in 2017. According to the company’s web site, the six brothers all grew up caddying and playing golf in the northern suburbs of Chicago and were inducted into the Caddie Hall of Fame in 2015.

“William Murray Golf was created on the notion that life and golf don’t have to be so serious. Keep it light, have fun, and bring personality onto the course,” according to the company’s website.Bill Murray famously played a deranged golf course groundskeeper in the 1980 movie, “Caddyshack,” that was co-written by his brother, Brian.

The Doobie Brothers aren’t happy that Bill Murray is using their song to sell ‘ugly’ golf shirts

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series,where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

R.E.M. “The One I Love,” Album: Document (1987)

When the Georgia natives unleashed their first Top-10 single in concert, R.E.M. guitar-slinger Peter Buck felt baffled by audiences’ romantic reactions. Said Buck: “I’d look into the audience and there would be couples kissing. Yet the verse is … savagely anti-love … People told me that was ‘their song.’ That was your song?”

The lead vocal on the chorus contains just one word: “Fire,” which Michael Stipe draws out into a long wail. In the background, you can hear bass player Mike Mills singing, “She’s comin’ down on her own, now.”

Often misinterpreted as a love song, this is just the opposite. Michael Stipe describes this song as about using people over and over. It’s deceptive because it could be a love song until the line, “A simple prop to occupy my time.”

This is not based on any real person or event. The band made up the lyrics while they were on a tour.

Singer Michael Stipe echoed Buck’s emotions in a 1992 interview with Qmagazine, admitting that he almost didn’t even record the song, calling it “too brutal” and “really violent and awful.” After five years of “The One I Love” going out to loved ones as dedications over the radio waves, Stipe took a complacent stance on his song’s misconstrued fate, saying, “It’s probably better that they think it’s a love song at this point.”

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Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series,where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Beastie Boys – Fight For Your Right, Album: Licensed To Ill (1986)

We tend to fall in love with songs without paying much attention to the lyrics – which can be highly deceiving. We sing along, not knowing what the true intentions of the artists are. We don’t know where they are coming from or what part of the story they are presenting to us.

What may seem like a love ballad may actually be about a stalker. And don’t be fooled, what may seem like a fun song to dance to might be a reminder of death. Sometimes, bands even get so annoyed by their fans’ misinterpretations that they stop playing the song altogether. 

Of course, we naturally connect our favorite lyrics to the situations in our own life. One of the beauties about music is that it is open to interpretation.

However, whether we realize it or not, so many popular songs have a deep and sometimes disturbing meaning.

The fourth single released from Licensed to III in 1986 was the Beastie Boys’ most popular song. They quickly ascended to fame, but with a song that was meant to be a joke – something few fans realized.

Adam Yauch, founder of the band, and Tommy Triphammer, a friend of the Beastie Boys, wrote the lyrics to ridicule the rock scene, which they hated. To go along with what the band thought was an obnoxious song, they filmed an equally ridiculous music video. 

However, the Beastie Boys soon realized that their plan had backfired. Now, the people who they were trying to make fun of were listening to their music and loving it. 

They didn’t hide their disdain for the song for too long. The band disowned Fight for Your Right and haven’t played it live since 1987.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers, American Girl. Album: Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers (1977)

A track from the first Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers album, “American Girl” was never a huge hit, but it became one of their most popular songs. Part of its lasting appeal is its intrigue, as it is the subject of an urban myth.

Sorry, urban legend enthusiasts. Tom Petty’s 1977 standard wasn’t inspired by a University of Florida girl who committed suicide by jumping from a Beaty Towers balcony. Though the song’s second verse references both a girl standing “alone on her balcony” and “could hear the cars roll by out on 441” (a highway that runs near the Gainesville campus), Petty has shot down the misunderstanding on numerous occasions.

In the book Conversations With Tom Petty, the lead Heartbreaker is quoted as saying, “It’s become a huge urban myth down in Florida. That’s just not at all true. The song has nothing to do with that. But that story really gets around.” Heartbreakers’ guitarist Mike Campbell has backed Petty up, stating that some interpretations of the song took the lyrics at face value: “Some people take it literally and out of context. To me it’s just a really beautiful love song.”Tom Petty said of this song: “I wrote that in a little apartment I had in Encino. It was right next to the freeway and the cars sometimes sounded like waves from the ocean, which is why there’s the line about the waves crashing on the beach. The words just came tumbling out very quickly – and it was the start of writing about people who are longing for something else in life, something better than they have.”

Mike Campbell has been The Heartbreakers’ guitarist since they formed the band. Here’s what he told us about this song: “We used to have people come up to us and tell us they thought it was about suicide because of the one line about ‘if she had to die,’ but what they didn’t get was, the whole line is ‘if she had to die trying.’ Some people take it literally and out of context. To me it’s just a really beautiful love song. It does have some Florida imagery.”

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Happy Birthday Leonard Cohen!

Leonard Cohen, Everybody Knows. Album: I’m Your Man (1988)

This grimly funny study of exploitation introduced Sharon Robinson, who become a frequent writing collaborator of Leonard Cohen. She recalled to Uncut: “Leonard had most of the lyric done when he handed it to me. There’s a profound honesty in it. He’s exposing something we all know and talk about with those close to us, but not publicly. It says we’re not really in control of our destiny, there are others running things, and we go about our daily lives with that in the background.”

“It’s a protest song, so Leonard wanted something tough. I’d bring home verses, and go to the grand piano in my living room, as his lyrics require that purity of melody.”

“There are synths on the record as he likes the contrast with that very organic-sounding deep human voice of his. I tried to match the tone of the lyric with music I knew Leonard could sing, and want to. Leonard always says he has a three-note range, and those limitations on the melody and the importance of words, make you look for music that’s going to propel a lyric forward and give the listener time to digest all its layers. That simplicity leads to something wonderful.”

The song has been frequently covered. Artists that have recorded the tune include Concrete Blonde for the 1990 film Pump Up the Volume, Don Henley, on his 1995 set Actual Miles: Henley’s Greatest Hits and Rufus Wainwright (Cohen’s son in law) in Lian Lunson’s 2005 documentary film Leonard Cohen: I’m Your Man.

This has been widely used in television and film. Allan Moyle’s 1990 film Pump Up the Volume and Atom Egoyan’s 1994 movie Exotica, both featured the song prominently.

Don Henley’s version was heard in episode 219 of the television series Judging Amy, which aired in 2001.

This was used in a June 2008 anti-smoking advertisement commissioned by the New South Wales government in Australia with the theme “everybody knows smoking causes these diseases… yet you still do it.”

Norwegian pop star Sigrid covered this for the 2017 Justice League superhero movie. She told NME:

“I didn’t grow up listening to him – my parents listened more to Neil Young and Joni Mitchell – but I lived in a flatshare for two years and my flatmate loved Leonard Cohen. He would always play him when he got home from the studio or something. He’s one of the great songwriters of all time, so it’s a huge honor to be able to cover him. You’re always nervous of what people will think when you release something new, but mostly I’m happy that I’m now in the Justice League!”

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