Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Cool Movie Soundtracks Edition,” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Bohemian Rhapsody 2019

Queen, one of the worlds most iconic rock bands is immortalized in the film “Bohemian Rhapsody,” named after their most popular songs to date. Written before its time, Bohemian Rhapsody, a rock opera song is the bands signature sonata.

Freddie Mercury — the lead singer of Queen — defies stereotypes and convention to become one of history’s most beloved entertainers. The band’s revolutionary sound and popular songs lead to Queen’s meteoric rise in the 1970s. After leaving the group to pursue a solo career, Mercury reunites with Queen for the benefit concert Live Aid — resulting in one of the greatest performances in rock ‘n’ roll history.

  • Freddie Mercury wrote the lyrics, and there has been a lot of speculation as to their meaning. Many of the words appear in the Qu’ran. “Bismillah” is one of these and it literally means “In the name of Allah.” The word “Scaramouch” means “A stock character that appears as a boastful coward.” “Beelzebub” is one of the many names given to The Devil.

    Mercury’s parents were deeply involved in Zoroastrianism, and these Arabic words do have a meaning in that religion. His family grew up in Zanzibar, but was forced out by government upheaval in 1964 and they moved to England. Some of the lyrics could be about leaving his homeland behind. Guitarist Brian May seemed to suggest this when he said in an interview about the song: “Freddie was a very complex person: flippant and funny on the surface, but he concealed insecurities and problems in squaring up his life with his childhood. He never explained the lyrics, but I think he put a lot of himself into that song.”

    Another explanation is not to do with Mercury’s childhood, but his sexuality – it was around this time that he was starting to come to terms with his bisexuality, and his relationship with Mary Austin was falling apart.

    Whatever the meaning is, we may never know – Mercury himself remained tight-lipped, and the band agreed not to reveal anything about the meaning. Mercury himself stated, “It’s one of those songs which has such a fantasy feel about it. I think people should just listen to it, think about it, and then make up their own minds as to what it says to them.” He also claimed that the lyrics were nothing more than “Random rhyming nonsense” when asked about it by his friend Kenny Everett, who was a London DJ.

    The band were always keen to let listeners interpret their music in a personal way to them, rather than impose their own meaning on songs, and May stated that the band agreed to keep the personal meaning behind the song private out of respect for Mercury.
  • Mercury may have written “Galileo” into the lyrics for the benefit of Brian May, who is an astronomy buff and in 2007 earned a PhD in astrophysics. Galileo is a famous astronomer known for being the first to use a refracting telescope.
  • The backing track came together quickly, but Queen spent days overdubbing the vocals in the studio using a 24-track tape machine. The analog recording technology was taxed by the song’s multitracked scaramouches and fandangos: by the time they were done, about 180 tracks were layered together and “bounced” down into sub-mixes. Brian May recalled in various interviews being able to see through the tape as it was worn so thin with overdubs. Producer Roy Thomas Baker also recalls Mercury coming into the studio proclaiming, “oh, I’ve got a few more ‘Galileos’ dear!” as overdub after overdub piled up.
  • Was Freddie Mercury coming out as gay in this song? Lesley-Ann Jones, author of the biography Mercury, thinks so.

    Jones says that when she posed the question to Mercury in 1986, the singer didn’t give a straight answer, and that he was always very vague about the song’s meaning, admitting only that it was “about relationships.” (Mercury’s family religion, Zoroastrianism, doesn’t accept homosexuality, and he made efforts to conceal his sexual orientation, possibly so as not to offend his family.)

    After Mercury’s death, Jones says she spent time with his lover, Jim Hutton, who told her that the song was, in fact, Mercury’s confession that he was gay. Mercury’s good friend Tim Rice agreed, and offered some lyrical analysis to support the theory:

    “Mama, I just killed a man” – He’s killed the old Freddie he was trying to be. The former image.

    “Put a gun against his head, pulled my trigger, now he’s dead” – He’s dead, the straight person he was originally. He’s destroyed the man he was trying to be, and now this is him, trying to live with the new Freddie.

    “I see a little silhouetto of a man” – That’s him, still being haunted by what he’s done and what he is.
  • Queen made a video for the song to air on Top Of The Pops, a popular British music show, because the song was too complex to perform live – or more accurately, to be mimed live – on TOTP. Also, the band would be busy on tour during the single’s release and thus unable to appear.

    The video turned out to be a masterstroke, providing far more promotional punch than a one-off live appearance. Top Of The Pops ran it for months, helping keep the song atop the charts. This started a trend in the UK of making videos for songs to air in place of live performances.

    When the American network MTV launched in 1981, most of their videos came from British artists for this reason. In the December 12, 2004 issue of the Observernewspaper, Roger Taylor explained: “We did everything we possibly could to avoid appearing in Top Of The Pops. It was one, the most boring day known to man, and two, it’s all about not actually playing – pretending to sing, pretending to play. We came up with the video concept to avoid playing on Top Of The Pops.”

    The group had previously appeared on the show twice, to promote the “Seven Seas of Rhye” and “Killer Queen” singles.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Cool Movie Soundtracks Edition,” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Mo’ Better Blues (1990)

It’s hard to go wrong with just about any soundtrack from just about any Spike Lee joint: the go-go heavy School Daze, the Public Enemy–anchored Do the Right Thing, Stevie Wonder’s Jungle Fever, Prince’s Girl 6, and so on.

But Mo’ Better Blues may be the score that’s closest to Lee’s heart. The movie is partially inspired by his own jazz musician father, Bill Lee (who composed the title track), and it’s set to a mix of original Branford Marsalis and Terence Blanchard numbers that run the gamut of jazz styles, from sultry vocal ballads to snazzy melodic pop to avant-garde dissonance.

The album’s most vital track may be Gang Starr’s “Jazz Thing,” a hip-hop history of the genre that many neophytes have used as a recommendation list for what to listen to: from Theolonious Monk (“a melodious thunk”) to Ornette Coleman (“another soul man”).

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Cool Movie Soundtracks Edition,” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Dazed And Confused (1993)

The high-schoolers in Richard Linklater’s 1976-set suburban Texas slice of life are convinced they’re living through one of the lamest eras in American history. The songs blasting out of their car stereos suggest otherwise. Maybe these kids missed the rebellious ’50s and the radical ’60s, but the beatniks, hippies, and early rockers who came before them at least cleared the way for them to smoke dope all day and listen to Foghat, Alice Cooper, and ZZ Top. In the year of the American bicentennial, teenagers had never been so free.

Dazed and Confused is simply one of the finest, if not thee finest, film about high school ever made. It launched the career of several actors, as well as its writer/director. Richard Linklater not only painted statues to look like KISS, but painted a picture of high school that many have tried to duplicate, but have never replicated.

The movie’s success is attributed to its great cast, quotable dialogue, and, of course, the music. In fact, the soundtrack was so good, they made two: Dazed and Confused and Even More Dazed and Confused. Both outstanding soundtracks, both worth investigating.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Cool Movie Soundtracks Edition,” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Almost Famous

Almost Famous is Set in 1973, it chronicles the funny and often poignant coming of age of 15-year-old William, an unabashed music fan who is inspired by the seminal bands of the time. When his love of music lands him an assignment from Rolling Stone magazine to interview the up-and-coming band Stillwater — fronted by lead guitar Russell Hammond and lead singer Jeff Bebe William embarks on an eye-opening journey with the band’s tour, despite the objections of his protective mother.

The film is semi-autobiographical, as Crowe himself was a teenage writer for Rolling Stone. It is based on his experiences touring with rock bands Poco, the Allman Brothers Band, Led Zeppelin, Eagles, and Lynyrd Skynyrd. … Roger Ebert hailed it the best film of the year as well as the ninth-best film of the 2000s.

Stillwater is a composite of bands and musicians who Cameron Crowe met whilst working at Rolling Stone. It is said to be likely that guitarist Russell Hammond is based on Gregg Allman of the Allman Brothers, who Crowe went on tour with in 1973.

Almost Famous is a love letter to music, not rock star decadence. The film boasts an all star sound track of A – List musicians.

Every time I hear the song Tiny Dancer by artist Sir Elton John it takes me back 20 years ago to the scene where the band Stillwater along with their entourage of groupies sing along while traveling to the bands next destination on their tour bus, a 1962 Eagle Model 01 ‘Doris’

“Almost Famous” turns 20 yet the film still holds up well as a snapshot of 1970s counterculture. Reading the opening paragraph of the story, you can almost certainly hear Frances McDormand (Oscar-nominated for her iconic turn as a sheltering, truth-talking mother) admonishing Patrick Fugit:

“‘There will be absolutely no rock music in our house.’ With those epic words, my mother and father ushered in 1968. My mom was an English teacher, and early on she spotted the threat that rock posed to all those finely-bound books lining our cabinets. My sister and I lobbied hard, assuring them that drugs and promiscuous sex were not what our music was about. Rock was our poetry. Yes, came her reply, but ‘it’s the poetry of drugs and promiscuous sex!’ Of course she was right, but few were as good at feigning outrage as my sister and me.”

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Cool Movie Soundtracks Edition,” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Like prom dresses and middle-school diaries, soundtrack albums are potent, often awkward reminders of a particular time and place — cultural artifacts that stir myriad memories for those who lived through the era but impossible to understand if you didn’t. The early Nineties were filled with best-selling soundtracks, everything from Dazed and Confused to Pulp Fiction, each of them catering to a specific slice of the listening public. For some fans, the period’s preeminent soundtrack belonged to 1994’s The Crow; like the movie that inspired it, the collection drips with a moody, eyeliner-smeared darkness that’s so of its time, it makes listening to it today comparable to leafing through old graduation photos.

Nine Inch Nails, Dead Souls. Album: The Crow Soundtrack (1994)

“Dead Souls” is a cover of a Joy Division song, frequently played live. It appeared in the 1994 film The Crow and was released on its soundtrack. It was also the tenth track (before “A Warm Place”) on the Japanese version of The Downward Spiral. In 2004, it was included as the fifth track on the second disc of the 10th anniversary The Downward Spiral Deluxe Edition.

The Joy Division original was recorded in 1979 and released on their compilation album Still. In commentary for The Crow with producer and musical supervisor Jeff Most, it is revealed that Nine Inch Nails were originally supposed to perform in the film instead of My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult. While this song appears on The Definitive NIN – The Singles, it was never released as a single or promo.

“Dead Souls” is often considered to be about a schizophrenic man, as evidenced by the lyric “a duel of personalities” and the other lyric “they keep calling me”.

Dead Souls” is a regular in setlists. In the With Teeth: Summer Amphitheater Tour, Peter Murphy joined NIN on stage to sing this song at the live radio show on July 1, 2006, and at the last show of the tour on July 8, 2006. On the Self Destruct Tour, Reznor would sing “The Becoming” lyric, “god damn this noise inside my head,” after the end of this song. It would then transition with the sound of wind into a performance of “Help Me I Am In Hell.”

Lyrics:

  Someone take these dreams away
    That point me to another day
    A duel of personalities
    That stretch all true reality
    
    They keep calling me
    Keep on calling me
    
    When figures from the past stand tall
    And mocking voices ring the hall
    Imperialistic house of prayer
    Conquistadores who took their share
    
    They keep calling me
    Keep on calling me
    
    Calling me

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

The Flaming Lips, The Spider Bite Song. Album: The Soft Bulletin (1999)

This song chronicles the experiences the band members had prior to recording The Soft Bulletin. Lead singer Wayne Coyne’s father passed the year before, bassist Michael Ivins was in a very strange car accident. Lastly, drummer/guitarist Steven Drozd came close to having to have his arm amputated due to a spiderbite.

This song is very piano-driven but has an intriguing drum effect all throughout.

It turned out that Drozd’s arm was abscessed as a result of his heroin use rather than because of the spider bite. Wayne Coyne recalled to Uncut magazine June 2008: “Everyone wants to know on ‘Spiderbite Song’ whether I really knew that Steven had a drug problem. All I can say is, not as much as I knew later! Everybody was busy doing their own trip, and being around drug addicts, they’re not much different than they were the previous week. I mean, it happens so slowly that you get used to it. It must be like those guys that have giant tumors on their faces. It grows a little every day. When I think of it now, I’m surprised at how precarious the whole thing was. That probably played into the song and the whole theme of the LP. In a way I probably thought that Steven may not even be here for another year.”

Photo: The Flaming Lips Facebook Page

Psychedelic Lunch

Ukrainian modern metallers JINJER have released the official live video for the song “Pit Of Consciousness”from their latest album “Macro”. The clip was filmed by Oleg Rooz (SUICIDAL TENDENCIESTHE DILLINGER ESCAPE PLANENTER SHIKARI) during the band’s captivating 2019 performance in Kiev.

Commented bass player Eugene Abdukhanov: “Back when we recorded this show, we were on the tail end of a six-month tour, and somewhere in between all that madness, we managed to write and record ‘Macro’… It was an extremely stressful time. But it was one of the most positive times of our lives.

“Things right now look pretty grim and no one knows what will happen next.

“We want to release this video with the hopes of letting people know that no matter how crazy, confusing and scary things get — BETTER TIMES are on the way.

“Let’s use the time at home in isolation to take a good look inside and learn about our true selves…”

“Macro” was released in October via Napalm Records. Punishing riffs, aggressively blended vocals and astonishingly deep lyrics make “Macro” JINJER‘s most advanced and undeniable album yet — taking the listener on a journey of trauma, power struggle and greed with a progressive groove metal backdrop.

While January 2019’s “Micro” EP proved to be a short exercise in madness and technical brilliance, fans still weren’t prepared for what JINJER had in store with the absolutely unbridled “Macro”. Defying all boundaries, the aptly titled opening track “On The Top” features the band’s eclectic trademarks and obeys one law only — their own. Frontwoman Tatiana Shmaylyuk defines the unique character of the Ukrainian act with menacing whispers, enthralling clean vocals and brutal growls whilst lethally groovy riff cascades melt into twisted songwriting. There is space for a microscopic bit of reggae “Judgement (& Punishment)” in all the heaviness, the double bass is beautifully out of control on “Pausing Death”, and technically superior tracks like “Home Back” defy gravity.

JINJER Releases Live Video For ‘Pit Of Consciousness’