Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

The Flaming Lips, The Spider Bite Song. Album: The Soft Bulletin (1999)

This song chronicles the experiences the band members had prior to recording The Soft Bulletin. Lead singer Wayne Coyne’s father passed the year before, bassist Michael Ivins was in a very strange car accident. Lastly, drummer/guitarist Steven Drozd came close to having to have his arm amputated due to a spiderbite.

This song is very piano-driven but has an intriguing drum effect all throughout.

It turned out that Drozd’s arm was abscessed as a result of his heroin use rather than because of the spider bite. Wayne Coyne recalled to Uncut magazine June 2008: “Everyone wants to know on ‘Spiderbite Song’ whether I really knew that Steven had a drug problem. All I can say is, not as much as I knew later! Everybody was busy doing their own trip, and being around drug addicts, they’re not much different than they were the previous week. I mean, it happens so slowly that you get used to it. It must be like those guys that have giant tumors on their faces. It grows a little every day. When I think of it now, I’m surprised at how precarious the whole thing was. That probably played into the song and the whole theme of the LP. In a way I probably thought that Steven may not even be here for another year.”

Photo: The Flaming Lips Facebook Page

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Black Sabbath, Shes Gone. Album: Technical Exstacy (1976)

Technical Ecstasy is the seventh studio album by English rock band Black Sabbath, produced by guitarist Tony Iommi and released in September 1976. The album was certified Gold on 19 June 1997 and peaked at number 51 on the Billboard 200 Album chart. “Shes Gone,” has a psychedelic rock sound.

Black Sabbath has been one of my favorite bands all through the seventy’s. This album would rate in my top five. The song She’s Gone is/was one of my favorites.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Moody Blues, Legend Of A Mind. Album: In Search of the Lost Chord (1968)

  • This song is about Timothy Leary, who is mentioned several times in the lyrics, although the title is not. Leary is a counter-culture icon who was a proponent ot the therapeutic effects of LSD. >>
  • The song features a flute solo by Ray Thomas, lasting about two minutes in the middle.
  • Mike Pinder plays the mellotron on the track. It’s been said that The Moody Blues invented “symphonic rock” with their discovery and adoption of the somewhat “cosmic” instrument. “If we hadn’t discovered the mellotron, nobody else would have,” Justin Hayward told Q magazine in 1990. “It was a very temperamental instrument. It was always going wrong. It weighed a ton. We only had one roadie and it would take all of us to carry it into a gig. We used to sleep on it because it was the biggest thing in our transit. There used to be fights to see who would sleep on it.”

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

The Grateful Dead, Box Of Rain. Album: American Beauty (1970)

This song was written for Phil Lesh’s father who was dying. Lesh wanted a song to sing to his father before he died. He wrote the music and recorded it and gave the tape to Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter. Hunter listened to the music and wrote the lyrics after listening to the tape only a few times.This song was often sung in response to Deadheads chanting “We Want Phil!” It was also the last song the Grateful Dead ever played. On July 9, 1995, they played it as a second encore after “Black Muddy River” during their last show, which took place at Soldier Field in Chicago.

Robert Hunter says in his lyrics anthology, which is named after this song, that “If if a lyric wrote itself, this did-as fast as the pen would pull.”

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Tomorrow, My White Bicycle. Album: Tomorrow (1968)

Tomorrow were a 1960s psychedelic rock, pop and freakbeat band. Despite critical acclaim and support from DJ John Peel who featured them on his “Perfumed Garden” radio show, the band didn’t have much commercial success.

My White Bicycle’, written by Keith Hopkins (the real name of Tomorrow lead singer Keith West) and Ken Burgess, was inspired by the White Bicycle Plan: a community bike–sharing programme that industrial designer–inventor Luud Schimmelpennink of the radical Dutch Provo counterculture movement instigated in Amsterdam during the mid–1960s. After gathering 50 bikes and painting them white, the anarchic Provos parked them unchained all over the city so that they could be used and then left on the streets by anyone who needed them to get around.

The aim was to eliminate all motorised traffic in the city centre and improve public transportation, but the police impounded the bikes because municipal law forbade them to be left unlocked. So, the Provos then retrieved the vehicles, equipped them with combination locks and painted the combinations on the bikes, and even though the White Bicycle Plan still received no support from the local authorites, it served as the model for similar programmes that are today in force in various European cities.

Abbey Road engineer and producer Norman Smith (left) and Mark Wirtz. Photo: Mark Frumento

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

The Rolling Stones, Ruby Tuesday. Album: Between The Buttons (1967)

The Summer of Love was a social phenomenon that occurred during mid-1967, when as many as 100,000 people, mostly young people sporting hippie fashions of dress and behavior, converged in San Francisco’s neighborhood of Haight-Ashbury. More broadly, the Summer of Love encompassed the hippie music, drug, anti-war, and free-love scene throughout the American west coast, and as far away as New York City.

Hippies, sometimes called flower children, were an eclectic group. Many were suspicious of the government, rejected consumerist values, and generally opposed the Vietnam War. A few were interested in politics; others were concerned more with art (music, painting, poetry in particular) or spiritual and meditative practices.

Inspired by the Beat Generation of authors of the 1950s, who had flourished in the North Beach area of San Francisco, those who gathered in Haight-Ashbury during 1967 allegedly rejected the conformist and materialist values of modern life; there was an emphasis on sharing and community.

Six months after the Human Be-In, June’s Fantasy Fair and Magic Mountain Music Festival virtually set the prototype for almost every music festival to follow. Held on the south face of Mount Tamalpais north of San Francisco, the show featured musicians such as Canned Heat, Jefferson Airplane, and The Doors. In true environmentally responsible fashion, all litter was picked up and binned at the end of it all, leaving the lovely Mount Tamalpais as they found it.

Later that same month, the Monterey International Pop Music Festival further established the connection between music, drugs, and mass outdoor gatherings that were quickly coming to define the burgeoning hippie movement. The likes of Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin performed for as many as 90,000 people and the Summer of Love was truly now underway in ways that would resonate throughout the San Francisco Bay Area and across America.The fourth US #1 hit for the Rolling Stones, this ballad is about a groupie. It may have been inspired by Linda Keith, who was Keith Richards’ girlfriend. Richards said in According to the Rolling Stones: “It was probably written about Linda Keith not being there (laughs). I don’t know, she had pissed off somewhere. It was very mournful, very, VERY Ruby Tuesday and it was a Tuesday.”

Richards: “That’s one of those things – some chick you’ve broken up with. And all you’ve got left is the piano and the guitar and a pair of panties. And it’s goodbye you know. And so it just comes out of that. And after that you just build on it. It’s one of those songs that are easiest to write because you’re really right there and you really sort of mean it. And for a songwriter, hey break his heart and he’ll come up with a good song.”

Keith Richards and Brian Jones wrote most of this, but in keeping with Stones tradition, it was credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

Brian Jones plays the recorder (it sounds like a flute) in this song. He was their lead guitarist until he died in 1969, and could play just about any instrument.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Bob Dylan, Times They Are A Changin. Album: The Times They Are A – Changin’ (1964)

In the 1960s, several now-influential artists appealed to the disaffected counterculture’s emphasis on peace and love, especially with the sliding approval rates of the Vietnam War. As public approval of the Vietnam War dwindled in the latter half of the 1960s, popular music artists began to record songs that reflected this disapproval and ultimately became a new method of protest.

To begin, the highly-influential folk musician Bob Dylan recorded the song “The Times They Are A-Changin’.” Written in 1963, just before the public began to disapprove of America’s involvement in Vietnam, the song features a simple melody played by Dylan’s acoustic guitar and harmonica. The lines “There’s a battle outside/and it’s ragin’/it’ll soon shake your windows/rattle your walls” are an obvious reference to the Vietnam War.

Dylan goes further and sings the lines, “Come mothers and fathers/throughout the land/and don’t criticize/what you can’t understand/your sons and daughters are beyond your command.” While at first glance Dylan could be pleading with the public to stop trying to understand the war, Dylan is in fact trying to tell us something else. In poetic terms, he shows the mass confusion, frustration, and anger at how many parents’ sons and daughters were sent off to war.

Moreover, a 1966 anti-war music poster advertised the popular rock groups Jefferson Airplane and Mystery Trend. The event, a benefit dance held at the University of California at Berkeley on March 25, 1966, features a large war scene drawing at the center. The war scene, colored in red, white and black, features combatants wearing helmets and holding machine guns, while avoiding explosions triggered by bombers flying overhead. At the top of the scene, the words “Vietnam” can be seen in the same font that the military uses. Below “Vietnam,” the word “Peace” can be seen scrawled in white lettering.

Psychedelic Lunch