HAPPY BIRTHDAY ROB ZOMBIE (54) \m/

Rob Zombie (born Robert Bartleh Cummings; January 12, 1965) is an American musician and filmmaker. He is a founding member of the heavy metal band White Zombie, releasing four studio albums with the band.

He is the older brother of Spider One, lead vocalist for American rock band Powerman 5000.

Zombie’s first solo effort was a song titled “Hands of Death (Burn Baby Burn)” (1996) with Alice Cooper, which went on to receive a nomination for Best Metal Performance at the 39th Annual Grammy Awards.

In 1997, he began working on his debut solo studio album, Hellbilly Deluxe, which was released in August 1998. A month later, Zombie officially disbanded White Zombie. Hellbilly Deluxe went on to sell over three million copies worldwide and spawned three singles. He released a remix album, American Made Music to Strip By, the following year that contained songs from Hellbilly Deluxe. Zombie directed the horror film House of 1000 Corpses in 2000, though the controversial project was not released until 2003.

His second studio album, The Sinister Urge (2001), became his second platinum album in the United States. In 2003, Zombie released the compilation album Past, Present, & Future.

Zombie directed The Devil’s Rejects (2005), a direct sequel to his prior film House of 1000 Corpses. The project received a more positive reception than its predecessor.

His third studio album, Educated Horses (2006), was a departure from his earlier recordings. The album became his third to enter the top ten of the Billboard 200, though saw a decrease in sales when compared to his previous releases.

Deciding to focus on his directing career, Zombie directed the horror film Halloween (2007), a remake of the 1978 horror classic of the same name. The film became Zombie’s highest-grossing film to date, though was met with a lukewarm critical reception. He later directed Halloween II (2009), which failed to match the success of its predecessor.

He released the animated film The Haunted World of El Superbeasto that same year. Zombie returned to music with the release of his fourth studio album, Hellbilly Deluxe 2 (2010). The album peaked at number eight in the United States and sold over 200,000 copies in the country.

In 2012, Zombie released a second remix album and directed the horror film The Lords of Salem, which was released the following year. He released his fifth studio album Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor the following year (2013).

He directed the horror film 31 and has purchased the rights to a film about the NHL team Philadelphia Flyers, titled The Broad Street Bullies; no release date for the film has been announced. Since the beginning of his music career, Zombie’s music and lyrics have featured notable horror and sci-fi themes.

His live shows have been praised for their elaborate shock rock theatricality. Since beginning his solo career, Zombie has sold an estimated fifteen million albums worldwide.

Written By Vinyl Lair

Happy Birthday Rob Zombie!

Written By Braddon S. Williams

Rob Zombie: Hellbilly Delux

Rob Zombie launched his mega-successful solo career 20 years ago with Hellbilly Deluxe: 13 Tales Of Cadaverous Cavorting Inside The Spookshow International (1998).

Zombie disbanded White Zombie shortly after his album’s release.

Musically, Hellbilly Deluxe is much like his previous band’s material, though possibly a little more industrial and electronic influenced.

Creatively, Rob Zombie wrote all the lyrics and co-wrote all the music with the album’s producer, Scott Humphrey, making him completely in charge of his solo direction.

Rob also directed music videos for every song on Hellbilly Deluxe.

Songs from this platinum debut remain in Zombie’s live show all these years later, especially Dragula, Superbeast, and Living Dead Girl.

As a solo artist and movie director, Rob Zombie allows all of us metalheads and horror movie fanatics to collectively celebrate Halloween year ’round.

https://youtu.be/BvsMPOfblfg

Influences And Recollections of a Musical Mind

On this date in history, 7/18/2018, The Twins Of Evil Tour featuring Rob Zombie, Marilyn Manson, and Deadly Apples made an appearance at Deer Creek in Noblesville, IN (or Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center if you insist on being technical)! It is no secret that I am an enormous fan of all things Zombie and Manson, so my anticipation at seeing them both together was astronomical to say the least. This was my 10th time seeing Rob Zombie (twice with White Zombie and 8 times solo) and my 9th time seeing Marilyn Manson and this tour definitely lived up to the hype. Deadly Apples started the show with a good set of original material. I was unfamiliar with them, but learned they hail from Canada and this was their first tour in 8 years. Their sound was really well produced and at times they would build up this big crescendo of power, only to bring it down and kind of let the moment slip away. I’ve seen better and I’ve seen worse. Speaking of better and worse, Manson has had his ups and downs on live stages, and I was thrilled that he seems to be back to caring about his craft again. His latest album, Heaven Upside Down, is a killer, and this performance included a couple of tracks off of it in addition to a handful of classics from Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals. Manson brought out two different pulpits to perform from, both songs being highlights of his set. The final song was a cover of the song Cry Little Sister from the movie Lost Boys. Like all the other covers he has done throughout his career, this one received the Manson touch and sounded suitably goth and menacing. As soon as Rob Zombie hit the stage there was absolutely no disputing who the true headliner was. Zombie pulled out all the big screens and every flashing light in the known galaxy to accentuate his ghoulish party anthems. Ironically, half of Zombie’s band spent time in the employ of Manson, making this a reunion show of sorts. The Zombie band consisting of Ginger Fish on drums, Piggy D on bass, and the astonishing John 5 on guitar, were in crushing form, delivering devilishly diabolical stadium sized riffs and rhythms without any pauses. When Zombie announced that he was going to do a song with his new BFF, the place went wild as Manson joined him for a high energy blast, covering Helter Skelter by The Beatles, complete with images of the infamous Charles Manson and his “family” projected on the screens accompanying the song that will forever be linked to them. Another short highlight was the unveiling of the official trailer for Zombie’s next movie, Three From Hell, due in 2019. All in all, The Twins Of Evil Tour was loud, fun, entertaining, and never a dull moment. I foresee adding to my numbers for both Manson and Zombie, because they still do that shock rock stuff better than anyone who isn’t named Alice Cooper!

Written By “The Concert Critic” aka Braddon S. Williams

On This Date in History

On this date in history, 8/13/2002, Ozzfest made the annual tour stop at Deer Creek. This time around the metal smorgasbord featured Ozzy Osbourne, System Of A Down, Rob Zombie, P.O.D., Drowning Pool, Adema, Black Label Society, Ill Nino, Down, Hatebreed, Meshuggah, Lost Prophets, Chevelle, The Apex Theory, Neurotica, The Used, Mushroomhead, Seether, Glassjaw, Switched, Otep, and Pulse Ultra.

This show ended up being sort of bizarre for me. First of all, I went alone, because my son went with a bunch of his friends, so I was on my own. No problem there.

A few days prior to the show I had accidentally washed one of my contact lenses down the sink, so I wore my glasses. Again, no problem. I just determined to stay out of the mosh pits and everything would be just fine!

I enjoyed some killer sets by Otep, Meshuggah (unbelievably brutal and fantastic!) and Hatebreed, along with okay sets by Neurotica (who did a pretty cool cover of “I Am The Walrus” by The Beatles, The Apex Theory (who actually benefited from a brief rain storm that united the crowd in an act of drenched solidarity) and Mushroomhead (who suffered from technical issues that were probably out of their control).

Phil Anselmo and the mighty Down were the headliners of the second stage and I had managed to maneuver my way to the very front of the stage. The first two songs were crazy good, and then the unthinkable happened!  A crowd surfer’s foot made contact with my head, and my glasses fell to the ground, instantly trampled and destroyed! I blindly pushed back through the crowd and found a payphone and called my roommate who was coming to the show later to see Ozzy and System Of A Down.

I luckily got her to bring my one remaining contact to me. While I waited, blind as a bat, I at least got to listen to Black Label Society and Drowning Pool (coincidentally, their lead singer’s last performance before he was found dead on his tour bus the next day) and finally my contact was delivered just in time for me to see Rob Zombie’s final song!

System and Ozzy finished in stellar form and that is my report for Ozzfest 2002. Moral of the story…be careful when rinsing contact lenses!

Written By Braddon S. Williams aka The Concert Critic

 

On This Date in History

On this date in history, 8/11/1996, Deer Creek in Noblesville, IN was the site of one of the best metal shows I have ever witnessed. Pantera, White Zombie, Deftones, and EyeHateGod combined to just decimate the outdoor venue in a true display of heavy music diversity.

4023790a397497b168b0db5a8bdff356After a crushing opening set by EyeHateGod that I heard more of than I actually saw, my friend and I finally found a patch of ground up in the lawn area and settled in for an amazing set of the atmospheric, sometimes claustrophobic euphoria that is Deftones’ specialty.

 

Chino Moreno has a voice unique in all of metal and the band utilizes this instrument to great effect, building cathedrals of sound around his emotive and eerie tones.

White Zombie came out and delivered the gargantuan horror rock spectacle that Rob Zombie has made his calling card throughout his brilliant career as both a rocker and director. I have a vivid memory of bass player Sean Yseult windmilling her green hair during a large portion of their show. e5d3589403b21bf8696da07d0a04ab0b--white-zombie-band-heavy-metal-rock.jpg

The previous year, White Zombie had released Astro Creep:2000, and their show featured a lot of that album. The highlight song remained “Thunder Kiss ’65” and it was a crushing finale to a monumentally entertaining set.

Zombie left the stage at 11 pm, the time that the venue’s curfew takes effect. The crowd went through a nervous period of waiting, but after a relatively quick set change, PanterA hit the stage with a vengeance, taking charge with a bare bones fury that was the perfect foil to White Zombie’s theatricality.

Pantera-630x420PanterA made their appearance to the prerecorded track of “Suicide Note, Pt. 1” and a back drop of huge marijuana leaves. From there it was relentlessly brutal groove metal from the band that defined that subgenre.

Phil Anselmo was in stellar voice and Dimebag Darrell claimed his crown as the greatest metal guitarist on the planet with incendiary leads and pummeling riffage. Whatever fine the band had to pay for going over the time limit that night was worth every penny.

Every person who was at that show knew that PanterA cared about our good time and they could have opted out, but they were there to play, and play they did. The neighbors probably weren’t too thrilled, but like they say, “If it’s too loud, you’re too old!”

Written By Braddon S. Williams aka The Concert Critic

On This Date in History

imagesOn this date in history, 6/29/1999, I witnessed my second Ozzfest in the friendly confines of Deer Creek in Noblesville, IN. This one was one of the best lineups they ever had, in my humble opinion, featuring Black Sabbath, Rob Zombie, Deftones, Slayer, Primus, Godsmack, System Of A Down, Apartment 26, all on the main stage, with Fear Factory, Static-X, Puya, Slipknot, Hed (Pe), Flashpoint, Pushmonkey, and Drain S.T.H. on the second stage. 88a04e3ef23045e4c5f262e8039b09df

For some unknown reason even to myself, I didn’t see any of the second stage bands that year, but I have heard from many sources that the first Indiana appearance of Slipknot was legendary. I know that Static-X and Fear Factory likely delivered crushing sets as well.

This was a concert of firsts for me. I saw System Of A Down, Godsmack, Slayer, and the mighty Black Sabbath for the first time at this show. I had seen Rob Zombie with White Zombie, but this was also the first time I saw him solo.

System Of A Down were up there doing what they do, and I was having a hard time wrapping my ears around it, having never properly heard them yet, but I started watching this guy who knew every word to every song and through his enthusiasm I caught their passion and became a fan instantly.

I went out and bought their debut cd the following day. Primus provided another first as they brought out Buckethead for an utterly mind blowing guitar solo segment during their performance. They also delighted the crowd by performing their self-penned theme song from the South Park tv show, creating a frenzied mosh pit that would have made Eric Cartman proud.

Speaking of frenzied mosh pits, Slayer came next and incinerated the playing field with their Slaytanic assault, melting faces and unleashing their legendary fury. I felt a little sorry for Deftones, who had to follow the blitzkrieg, but they are an amazing band in their own right, and they played great, as usual.

Rob Zombie put on a stunning visual overload type of show that he has made his career on, and proving beyond a doubt that he is one of the best metal headliners around. During “Thunder Kiss ’65”, Kerry King from Slayer joined Zombie on stage to deliver a ghoulish masterpiece.

imagesWhen Black Sabbath finally took the stage they opened with “War Pigs” and all the hair on my neck and arms literally stood up. I can’t begin to describe the glorious totality of that SOUND…Sabbath is like the slow moving lava cruising down the side of Mt. Doom, crushing all in its path in this infinitely compelling darkness. Without them, metal would have still been born one way or the other, but thankfully it WAS born with them, and this Ozzfest will always hold a special place in my heart. Sabbath and Slayer for the first time at the same concert? Yeah, that pretty much ruled!

Written By Braddon S. Williams aka The Concert Critic

 

On This Date in History

Rob Zombie, ‘The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser’ – Album Review Read More: Rob Zombie, ‘The Electric Warlock’ – Album Review

unnamed~By Chad Bower~

The title of Rob Zombie’s sixth solo album is almost as long as the record itself. The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser clocks in at a streamlined 31 minutes.

The lineup of Zombie, guitarist John 5, bassist Piggy D and drummer Ginger Fish is the same as their last release, 2013‘s Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor.

Zombie spent a lot of time working on the album, and is happy with the results: “I can easily say this is my favorite album yet… no joke. Yeah I know every f–king a–hole says that. But it is seriously our heaviest most f–ked up musical monster to date,” he says, adding, “Not since Hellbilly Deluxe have I spent this long putting an album together. It was worth it.”

The Electric Warlock… is exactly what you’d expect from Zombie: industrial tinged metal delivered with his trademark blend of samples, shock, horror and humor. The album begins with a brief opener that repeats the first half of the album title several times before launching into the moderately paced“Satanic Cyanide! The Killer Rocks On!”

“Well, Everybody’s F–king in a U.F.O.” is one of the catchiest and grooviest songs on the album, but with the racy title won’t be getting much airplay, at least not on commercial radio. Another song ripe for radio is the second single, “In The Age of the Consecrated Vampire We All Get High,” a heavy and ominous track with a memorable chorus and excellent guitar work from John 5.

 

 

“Rob Zombie – Well, Everybody’s Fucking in a U.F.O.”

 

 

Rob Zombie – “Get High”

 

After every few songs, a brief instrumental interrupts the proceedings before kicking back in. They act as a musical sorbet, cleansing the palette before the next ghoulish course begins. One of the instrumentals is acoustic, the other more industrial and electronic.

The songs on the album are lean and mean, with most between two and three minutes long. The exception is the closing track “Wurdalak,”nearly twice as long as the rest of the songs on the album. The tempo is slow, and it alternates heaviness and atmospherics, trailing out with soft piano and thunderstorm sound effects.

The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser is a heavy, well-played and well-crafted album that checks all the boxes Zombie fans have come to want and expect.

 

 

Rob Zombie – The Life And Times Of A Teenage Rock God