Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Spooktober Series” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Astro Zombies By The Misfits, Album: Walk Among Us (1982)

The zombie, often portrayed as an undead, flesh-eating, decaying corpse, has enjoyed a popularity surge in recent years. Whether they’re devouring their prey in The Walking Dead or getting their groove on in Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” video, zombies dominate pop culture. But are zombies real? Unlike many other monsters—which are mostly a product of superstition, religion and fear— zombies have a basis in fact, and several verified cases of zombies have been reported from Haitian voodoo culture.

Still From Night Of The Living Dead

A zombie, according to pop culture and folklore, is usually either a reawakened corpse with a ravenous appetite or someone bitten by another zombie infected with a “zombie virus.”

Still From Resident Evil

Zombies are usually portrayed as strong but robotic beings with rotting flesh. Their only mission is to feed. They typically don’t have conversations (although some may grunt a little).

Still From The Walking Dead

The Ancient Greeks may have been the first civilization terrorized by a fear of the undead. Archaeologists have unearthed many ancient graves which contained skeletons pinned down by rocks and other heavy objects, assumedly to prevent the dead bodies from reanimating.

Zombie folklore has been around for centuries in Haiti, possibly originating in the 17th century when West African slaves were brought in to work on Haiti’s sugar cane plantations. Brutal conditions left the slaves longing for freedom. According to some reports, the life—or rather afterlife—of a zombie represented the horrific plight of slavery.

Voodoo is a religion based in West Africa and practiced throughout Haiti and the Caribbean, Brazil, the American South and other places with an African heritage.

Many people who follow the voodoo religion today believe zombies are myths, but some believe zombies are people revived by a voodoo practitioner known as a bokor

Bokors have a tradition of using herbs, shells, fish, animal parts, bones and other objects to create concoctions including “zombie powders,” which contain tetrodotoxin, a deadly neurotoxin found in pufferfish and some other marine species. 

Used carefully at sub-lethal doses, the tetrodotoxin combination may cause zombie-like symptoms such as difficulty walking, mental confusion and respiratory problems.

High doses of tetrodotoxin can lead to paralysis and coma. This could cause someone to appear dead and be buried alive – then later revived.

Though it’s rare, there are several credible reports in medical journals of people using these compounds to induce paralysis in people, then revive them from the grave.

A 1997 article in the British medical journal The Lancet described three verifiable accounts of zombies. In one case, a Haitian woman who appeared to be dead was buried in a family tomb, only to reappear three years later. An investigation revealed that her tomb was filled with stones, and her parents agreed to admit her to a local hospital.

In another well-documented case, a Haitian man named Clairvius Narcisse entered a local hospital with severe respiratory problems in 1962. After he slipped into a coma, Narcisse was declared dead was buried shortly thereafter.

But 18 years later, a man walked up to Angelina Narcisse in a village marketplace, insisting she was his sister. Doctors, townspeople and family members all identified him as Clairvius Narcisse, who claimed he had been buried alive, then dug up and put to work on a distant sugar plantation.

The astro zombies are coming to destroy us in this punk anthem. This song was inspired by a 1968 science fiction horror film called The Astro-Zombies.

Psychedelic Lunch Halloween Edition

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Spooktober Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Vlad The Impaler By Kasabian, Album: West Ryder Pauper Lunatic Asylum (2009)

Before Bram Stoker transformed folklore into mainstream pop culture, before Lestat made women the world over long for bloodthirsty demon lovers, and long before immortal high school students sparkled in the sun, the ruthless 15th Century ruler of Wallachia, Romania, gave rise to the legend of the vampire: Vlad Dracul III. Bram Stoker borrowed this man’s Romanian name, Dracul, meaning devil or dragon, and turned it into his blood drinking fiend, Count Dracula. But the real Count Dracul, dubbed Vlad Ţepeş, Vlad the Impaler, earned his gruesome moniker by means far more grotesque than iterated in fiction.

Vlad the Impaler ruled at a time when the Balkans were under constant threat of conquest by the Turks and Ottoman Empire. Vlad took sadistic pleasure in the torture and execution of both prisoners and rivals. Rumoured to have set an entire banquet hall alight, roasting conspirators and traitors alive, Vlad’s preferred method of execution was impalement. This often resulted in veritable forests of dying men on spikes, which served as both punishment and warning, deterring many would-be attacks. Legend has it that Vlad was particularly partial to these macabre displays and that he often enjoyed a meal while watching the prisoners die in agony on their spikes, and that he dined while observing the dismemberment of prisoners by his executioners. It is perhaps these grisly past-times that cloaked Vlad Dracul in dark, vampiric legend.

Castle Bran

Although there is little to connect Vlad to Castle Bran, just outside Braşov, this fortress-like edifice built on the Transylvania-Wallachian border has become the home of the legend and a popular tourist destination, complete with rooms documenting the lore and culture of vampirism from Vlad Ţepeş to Tom Cruise & Brad Pitt, Vampires have become a cultural phenomenon, the brutal creatures warped by fiction writers into pretty pin-ups, objectified and lusted after. These immortal blood-drinkers have inspired numerous art forms from filmmakers to writers and musicians. Kasabian, the English rock band from Leicestershire, is no exception.

The song, “Vlad the Impaler,” begins with a warped guitar riff and is soon joined by thumping drums. The epileptic song is peppered with weird effects, lending it the necessary dark and spooky atmosphere, conjuring blood drenched images of psychopathic vampires haunting the dank corridors of crumbling castles. The odd glissando vocals also contribute to the more bizarre soundscape as do the lyrics which seem to be documenting a more contemporary murderous situation with an oblique reference to one of the darkest comic book characters in the DC universe, The Joker from the Batman series.

Bran Castles Bell Tower

“Vlad the Impaler” is the seventh track on the album West Ryder Pauper Lunatic Asylum, a concept album of sorts in which each track represents an inmate at the titular asylum, a real group of mental institutions in West Yorkshire. Given the inspiration behind the album, it’s no wonder Vlad makes an appearance on an album dedicated to those of questionable sanity.

Whether Vlad Dracul III really did enjoy sipping on type O negative or not, his unwavering brutality and sadistic pleasures laid the foundation for a cultural phenomenon that has persisted for centuries.

The song pays tribute to the late Dark Knight actor Heath Ledger through the line “Joker, see you on the other side.” Vocalist Tom Meighan explained to The SunMay 22, 2009: “When Heath Ledger died, Serge had just written Vlad The Impaler so he added that line to pay respect.” Guitarist Sergio Pizzorno added: “He’d just finished this amazing film and his life was over. I identified with him. I know so many people who get off their heads and then can’t sleep so they have a sleeping pill. I thought ‘That could have been anyone I know. It’s just such a waste of a great man’s life.”

Pizzorno told the New Musical Express January 17, 2009: “The timing is strange and the vocals are in and out because it’s a rant. I wanted that Beastie Boys, Clash feel, giving Tom a song to sing where he can rant, because that’s when he’s at his most genius.”

Pizzorno said to the NME June 13, 2009: “I knew the moment I wrote the riff it was going to be massive.” he added: “I like that Tom and my voices swap over.”

A video was made for this song starring English comedian Noel Fielding as a vampire slayer. Pizzorno told the NME: “Doing the video with Noel Fielding was outrageous, him running around a country house impaling people.”

Psychedelic Dinner All Hallows Eve Edition

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Spooktober Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

The Headless Horseman By Last Pharaoh, Album: The Mantle Of Spiders 2017

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” is a gothic story by American author Washington Irving. Written while Irving was living abroad in Birmingham, England, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” was first published in 1820. Along with Irving’s companion piece “Rip Van Winkle”, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” is among the earliest examples of American fiction with enduring popularity, especially during Halloween because of a character known as the Headless Horseman believed to be a Hessian soldier who was decapitated by a cannonball in battle.

From the listless repose of the place, and the peculiar character of its inhabitants, who are descendants from the original Dutch settlers, this sequestered glen has long been known by name of Sleepy Hollow … A drowsy, dreamy influence seems to hang over the land, and to pervade the very atmosphere.

The story is set in 1790 in the countryside around the Dutch settlement of Tarry Town (historical Tarrytown, New York), in a secluded glen known as Sleepy Hollow. Sleepy Hollow is renowned for its ghosts and the haunting atmosphere that pervades the imaginations of its inhabitants and visitors. Some residents say this town was bewitched during the early days of the Dutch settlement, while others claim that the mysterious atmosphere was caused by an old Native American chief, the “wizard of his tribe … before the country was discovered by Master Hendrik Hudson.” The most infamous spectre in the Hollow is the Headless Horseman, supposedly the ghost of a Hessian trooper whose head had been shot off by a stray cannonball during “some nameless battle” of the Revolution, and who “rides forth to the scene of battle in nightly quest of his head”.

The first single of the US Melodic Epic Heavy Metal Band LAST PHARAOH – “The Headless Horseman” was released on Soundcloud. The song is on their debut album “The Mantle Of Spiders”.

The band plays classic melodic US metal.

LINE-UP: Ron Toth (Symphony of Shred, Tothic, Jakob’s Tier) – guitars Tommy Santangelo (Rune Angel, Reaper) – vocalsMichael James (Seventh Calling, Lugosis Needle) – bassEd Shelinsky (Sanction, Sinister, Soundquake) – drums

www.facebook.com/LastPharaohMetalBandwww.facebook.com/LastPharaohMetalBand/videos/1347350168634061/

Psychedelic Lunch

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O Father, O Satan, O Sun By Behemoth, Album: The Satanist 2014

The Great Beast 666, Perabduro, Ankh-f-n-khonsu, the wickedest man in the world, Aleister Crowley was a noted – and controversial – occultist. He wrote widely, founded his own religious order, and designed a set of tarot cards that are still used today. Defiantly unconventional in every respect, he lived life according to his own dictum: ‘Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law.’

Sex and magic

Crowley’s interests combined the erotic and the esoteric. He published poetry, including a volume of verse described by one critic as ‘the most disgusting piece of erotica in the English language.’ He also became involved in secretive groups like the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.Gradually he evolved his own set of beliefs which drew on Oriental, ancient Egyptian, and an assortment of other traditions. His sexual preoccupations were equally various. He took many lovers – both male and female – and practised a form of sex magic.

Behemoth “O Father, O Satan, O Sun” Of course, this list wouldn’t be complete without a contribution from Behemoth, a band that has centered their music, lyrics, artwork, and stage performances around Satanism and the occult.

Behemoth is a Polish extreme metalband from Gdańsk, formed in 1991. They are considered to have played an important role in establishing the Polish extreme metal underground.

The Satanist is the tenth studio album by Behemoth. The album was released on February 3, 2014 through Nuclear Blast records.

On this particular song from The Satanist, “O Father O Satan O Sun” the band delivers their own take on “The Bornless Ritual,” which Crowley popularized. The ritual is essentially used prior to magic ceremonies to invoke the spirit of “The Bornless One,” the master entity of which all spirits, regardless if they are good or evil, are subservient.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Spooktober Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Ritual By Ghost, Album: Opus Eponymous 2010

As Halloween approaches, feel free to ignore “Monster Mash” in favor of this handful of more austere chillers: Vintage murder ballads, dissonant classical spine-tinglers, psychedelic freak-outs, shock-rock creep-outs, Southern gothic alt-rock gloom, art-noise desolation and more.

This is not the longtime (and awesome) Japanese psych band, Ghost. It’s the Swedish band, Ghost. They are dusky, full-on vintage Satanic heavy rock. The anonymous Darkthrone-approved sextet refer to themselves as “a devil worshiping ministry,” rather than a band. We’re told they formed “in order to spread their unholy gospels and, furthermore, trick mankind into believing that the end is ultimately a good thing.” (It’s not?) They also note, “This is Black Metal at its most original and deceiving.” Black Metal in the sense of the Black Arts (or in the sense of a Venom album): Ghost give us very well-done vintage NWOBHM/Satanic ’70s metal with immediate, amazing hooks. Right, the lyrics focus on the Dark Lord, but there’s nothing scary about the music — think Mercyful Fate and old-timey Witchfinder General, but also Blue Oyster Cult and something more pop-rock nasal. Or get acquainted via “Ritual,” the chirpiest song about human sacrifice I know. It’s from the band’s full-length debut album, Opus Eponymous.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Spooktober Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

The Ripper By Judas Priest, Album: Album: Sad Wings Of Destiny (1976)

This is a brief recounting of the crimes of Jack the Ripper, from the perspective of the killer by Judas Priest.

Jack the Ripper terrorized London in 1888, killing at least five women and mutilating their bodies in an unusual manner, indicating that the killer had a substantial knowledge of human anatomy. The culprit was never captured—or even identified—and Jack the Ripper remains one of England’s, and the world’s, most infamous criminals.

All five killings attributed to Jack the Ripper took place within a mile of each other, in or near the Whitechapel district of London’s East End, from August 7 to September 10, 1888. Several other murders occurring around that time period have also been investigated as the work of “Leather Apron” (another nickname given to the murderer).

A number of letters were allegedly sent by the killer to the London Metropolitan Police Service (often known as Scotland Yard), taunting officers about his gruesome activities and speculating on murders to come. The moniker “Jack the Ripper” originates from a letter—which may have been a hoax—published at the time of the attacks.

Despite countless investigations claiming definitive evidence of the brutal killer’s identity, his or her name and motive are still unknown.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Spooktober Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Elizabeth Bathory By Dissection, Album: Storm of the Light’s Bane (2002)

On December 26, 1609 or 1610 (sources are not conclusive), Count Gyorgy Thurzo makes an investigative visit to Csejthe Castle in Hungary on orders from King Matthias and discovers Countess Elizabeth Bathory directing a torture session of young girls. Bathory was already infamous in the area for her torture and murder of servants and peasants, but her title and high-ranking relatives had, until this point, made her untouchable. Her bloodthirsty activities have led many to cite her as one of the first vampires in history.

Bathory was born in Transylvania in 1560 to a distinguished family that included kings, cardinals, knights, and judges. Though she counted many luminaries among her relatives, her family tree also featured some seriously disturbed kin. One of her uncles instructed her in Satanism, while her aunt taught her all about sadomasochism. At the age of 15, Bathory was married to Count Nadady, and the couple settled into Csejthe Castle. To please his wife, her husband reportedly built a torture chamber to her specifications.

Bathory’s torture included jamming pins and needles under the fingernails of her servant girls, and tying them down, smearing them with honey, and leaving them to be attacked by bees and ants. Although the count participated in his wife’s cruelties, he may have also restrained her impulses; when he died in the early 1600s, she became much worse. With the help of her former nurse, Ilona Joo, and local witch Dorotta Szentes, Bathory began abducting peasant girls to torture and kill. She often bit chunks of flesh from her victims, and one unfortunate girl was even forced to cook and eat her own flesh. Bathory reportedly believed that human blood would keep her looking young and healthy.

Since her family headed the local government, Bathory’s crimes were ignored until 1610. But King Matthias finally intervened because Bathory had begun finding victims among the daughters of local nobles. In January 1611, Bathory and her cohorts were put on trial for 80 counts of murder. All were convicted, but only Bathory escaped execution. Instead, she was confined to a room of the castle that only had slits for air and food. She survived for three years but was found dead in August 1614.

This is another song about one of the true fiends of history, and distinctly superior to the Venom track “Countess Bathory”. Like Venom, the Scandinavian band tackle this terrible subject head on, but their slightly more mystical approach is closer in spirit to the legend, and undoubtedly to the monster behind it.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Spooktober Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Psycho Killer By The Talking Heads, Album: Talking Heads:77

This song takes us inside the head of a deranged murderer. It started when lead singer David Byrne decided to write something in the vein of Alice Cooper, whose shock rock was all the rage. Byrne started with the first verse, which establishes a dangerous paranoia:

I can’t seem to face up to the facts
I’m tense and nervous and I can’t relax
I can’t sleep ’cause my bed’s on fire
Don’t touch me I’m a real live wire


The rest of the lyric is even more capricious, with this guy admitting he’s a psycho killer and warning us to run. It ended up being far more introspective than most Alice Cooper songs, but just as believable: while Cooper is a completely different guy off stage (Vince Furnier), Byrne really is the socially awkward genius he portrays in performance. He’s never killed anyone (that we know of) but can convincingly inhabit the character.

This was the first Talking Heads song. It was written in 1973 at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), where David Byrne and drummer Chris Frantz had a band called The Artistics. When Byrne presented the song, he explained that he wanted a Japanese section in the bridge, but when he asked a girl who spoke the language to come up with some murderous words, she understandably freaked out. Frantz’ girlfriend, Tina Weymouth, spoke French, so they had her write a French part for the bridge instead. She drew inspiration from the Norman Bates character in the 1960 Alfred Hitchcock thriller Psycho, which influenced the next verse:

You start a conversation you can’t even finish it
You’re talking a lot, but you’re not saying anything
When I have nothing to say, my lips are sealed
Say something once, why say it again?


Byrne incorporated a French line into the chorus: “Qu’est-ce que c’est?” (meaning “What is this?”) and followed it with a stuttering warning:

Fa-fa-fa-fa-fa-fa-fa-fa-fa-far better
Run, run, run, run, run, run, run away


The end result is one of the most famous songs about a psychopathic murderer, influenced by two touchstones of the genre: Alice Cooper and the movie Psycho.

The French section in the Bridge roughly translates to:

What I did that night
What she said that night
Realizing my hopes
I launch myself towards a glorious destiny


This reveals that the psycho killer is targeting a woman, just as Norman Bates did in Psycho.

David Byrne and Chris Frantz played this a few times in 1974 with their band The Artistics. Later that year, after Frantz and Tina Weymouth graduated from RISD (with degrees in painting), they moved in together with Byrne in a slummy apartment in New York City. Tina became their bass player, and they called their new group the Talking Heads. Starting in May 1975, they got some gigs at the club CBGB opening for the Ramones. “Psycho Killer” and a few other originals, including “Warning Sign” and “Love Goes to Building on Fire,” were in their setlist, rounded out with covers like “96 Tears.” They got the attention of various record labels and eventually signed to Sire Records. After adding guitarist Jerry Harrison to the group, they released their debut album, Talking Heads: 77, in 1977. Released as a single, “Psycho Killer” was their first chart hit, reaching #92 in March 1978.

Credited to David Byrne, Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth, this is the only song on the Talking Heads’ debut album that isn’t listed as a solo Byrne composition. Songwriting credits quickly became a sticking point in the band as Byrne became the focal point and gave the impression that he did all the songwriting himself. Frantz claims that he wrote the second verse to “Psycho Killer,” but Byrne has downplayed his contribution to the song, telling Mojo, “Chris and Tina helped me with some of the French stuff.”The “fa fa fa” part is redolent of the Otis Redding song “Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa (Sad Song).” Redding and other soul singers were a big influence on Talking Heads.

“Psycho Killer” was a turning point for David Byrne because it make him realize there was an audience for his eccentric songs. He considered it a “silly song” at the time, but there was no question it connected with audiences. The song also proved that Bryne, Frantz and Weymouth could create songs together; after writing it, Byrne and Frantz wrote “Warning Sign,” which ended up on Talking Heads’ second album.

There really was a psycho killer on the loose in the summer of 1977, months before this song was released. David Berkowitz, the “Son of Sam,” terrified New Yorkers before he was caught on August 10 after killing six people. Many suspected the song was about him, but it was written much earlier.

The 1984 Talking Heads film Stop Making Sense, directed by Jonathan Demme, opens with David Byrne entering the stage with a boombox, then performing “Psycho Killer” on acoustic guitar accompanied by the pre-recorded rhythm track from the tape. For the next song, “Heaven,” he is joined by bass player Tina Weymouth. Drummer Chris Frantz enters for “Thank You for Sending Me an Angel,” the Jerry Harrison completes the band when they do their fourth song, “Found A Job”

“Psycho Killer” also appears on their 1982 live album The Name Of This Band Is Talking Heads.

At one point, producer Tony Bongiovi got a carving knife from the kitchen in the studio and asked Byrne to hold it while he sang so he could get in character. He refused.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Spooktober Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Dee Dee Ramone and producer Daniel Rey wrote this song for the 1989 Stephen King movie Pet Sematary, which is based on his book that was published in 1983.

Stephen King is a huge Ramones fan and invited the band to his Bangor, Maine home as they played in New England. During the visit, he handed Dee Dee Ramone a copy of his Pet Sematary novel, and the bassist retreated to the basement. One hour later, Dee Dee returned with the lyrics to “Pet Sematary”. Shortly afterwards, drummer Marky Ramone said that Dee Dee’s attitude that day showed that he could achieve his plans to leave the band and attempt a career at hip hop music. He likened Dee Dee to King, saying that both wrote things people could relate to because they “penetrated to the curiosity, fears, and insecurities carried around with them and couldn’t put into words.”

Producer Daniel Rey became a co-writer by assisting with the structure of the song, while producer Jean Beauvoir of the Plasmatics helped give the song a more commercial style fit for radio play and film inclusion. As “Pet Sematary” sounded closer to the rock ballads of the period, it was a struggle for Johnny Ramone to play the arpeggios and chords, despite Dee Dee’s guidance.

The music video for “Pet Sematary” was filmed at the Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in the eponymous New York village. Shot on a cold night in January 1989, the video features black and white shots of the Ramones walking through the graveyard, as well as color footage of the band and various others miming to the song alongside an open grave. The video ends with the band playing on a hydraulic platform placed inside the open grave, which is gradually lowered until a group of undertakers cover the grave with a headstone that reads “The Ramones.” It was the last video featuring Dee Dee Ramone, who would depart the band and be replaced with C. J. Ramone. The video features cameos by Debbie Harry and Chris Stein of Blondie, as well as members of The Dead Boys. An alternate edit of the video features the aforementioned scenes interspersed with scenes from the film, with the opening footage of the band walking through the graveyard now appearing in color.

Another Ramones song, “Sheena Is A Punk Rocker,” also appears in the film.

The Ramones never had a major impact on MTV, but their video for this song got some airtime on the network. Set in a graveyard, the video was directed by Bill Fishman, who also helmed their clip for “I Wanna Be Sedated.”

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Spooktober Edition” where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore music from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Dead Skin Mask By Slayer, Album: Seasons in the Abyss 1990

This song is about serial killer Ed Gein, who skinned his dead victims and wore their skins as suits, hence the name “Dead Skin Mask.” At the end of the song, a voice can be heard saying things like, “I don’t want to play anymore, Mr. Gein.” and “LET ME OUT!”

Edward Theodore Gein August 27, 1906 – July 26, 1984), also known as the Butcher of Plainfield or the Plainfield Ghoul, was an American convicted murderer and body snatcher. Gein’s crimes, committed around his hometown of Plainfield, Wisconsin, gathered widespread notoriety in 1957 after authorities discovered he had exhumed corpses from local graveyards and fashioned trophies and keepsakes from their bones and skin. Gein also confessed to killing two women: tavern owner Mary Hogan in 1954 and hardware store owner Bernice Worden in 1957.

Slayer’s first two albums with producer Rick Rubin saw the band take their uncompromising thrash to new levels of high-speed hate (Reign in Blood) and doomy evil (South of Heaven). They closed their definitive trilogy with 1990’s Seasons in the Abyss, which followed the slower, moodier direction of its predecessor to an even darker, more malevolent place with songs like the title cut and “Dead Skin Mask.” It also led Slayer to one of their biggest tours, dubbed the Clash of the Titans, as well as to the end of their classic lineup, following drummer Dave Lombardo’s departure in 1992.

JEFF HANNEMAN told Revolver Magazine that he feels Seasons is just an extension of South of Heaven. We were still in that frame of mind after South. “Dead Skin Mask” is definitely my favorite song on that record — the riff is just haunting.

Psychedelic Lunch