“Hollow”, the new single from STATIC-X, can be streamed below. The song is taken from the band’s upcoming album titled “Project Regeneration”, featuring the last recordings of the band’s late frontman Wayne Static, which is due on May 29. The rest of the group’s original lineup — bassist Tony Campos, drummer Ken Jay and guitarist Koichi Fukuda — will also be featured on the album and in the music videos.

Campos stated about “Hollow”: “This song was originally a demo from the ‘Start A War’ album, which was never completed. Wayne and I never felt like the music on the original demo was fully realized. The vocals sounded great, but some of the musical compositions from that time period felt a bit experimental. There is a reason that some of these tracks never made it on a previous STATIC-X album, and it certainly wasn’t because of Wayne‘s vocals. The band was just going through a lot of changes at that time and, in retrospect, it felt like we were straying away from that authentic STATIC-X sound that had really defined us.”

Originally scheduled for release in spring of 2019, the new STATIC-X album was first intended to feature several guests vocalists, along with the original “Wisconsin Death Trip” band lineup of CamposJayand Fukuda.

During the recording sessions for “Project Regeneration”, one of STATIC-X‘s producers uncovered several additional unreleased and unfinished tracks, many of which contained isolated vocal performances by Wayne Static. Because of this incredible find, the new STATIC-X album will now feature lead vocals by Wayne on virtually every song.

t was very surreal,” said Campos. “Our producer was going through all of these old studio tapes, many of which were damaged. He called me up and told me that I needed to get down to the studio right away and listen to what he found. I jumped in my car and raced to the studio and what he shared fucking blew me away. It was Wayne singing on track after track, but there was little to no music on any of it. Most of the tapes were damaged and Wayne‘s voice was virtually all that remained intact.”

“It was just crazy!!” added drummer Ken Jay. “There we were, myself, Tony and Koichi, back in the studio together, after all these years, and somehow the universe decided to surprise us with all of these lost STATIC-Xtapes containing Wayne‘s voice. I just couldn’t help thinking that this was all somehow meant to be. I couldn’t stop thinking about how happy this was going to make Wayne‘s family, and all of the STATIC-X fans around the world.”

While this comes as amazing news for the fans, completing these additional tracks has created a lot of additional work for the band and their producers.

Jay added: “When we began working on ‘Project Regeneration’, our producers advised us to ignore all of the old demo music. We opted for the original band to re-enter the studio with nothing more than Wayne‘s vocal tracks. The vocals sound really great and I think that Wayne would be really happy with what we’ve done with the music and to hear that these tracks have finally realized their full potential.”

Back in 2018, STATIC-X released a teaser featuring clips from a brand-new music video, as well as five new STATIC-X tracks — “Road To Hell”“Something Of My Own”“Terminator Oscillator”“Hollow” and “Disco Otsego” — along with a personal message from Campos about the inspiration behind “Project Regeneration”.

While the identity of STATIC-X‘s touring singer Xer0 has not been officially revealed, strong rumors suggest that DOPE frontman Edsel Dope is the one performing with JayFukuda and Campos and appearing in all of STATIC-X‘s promotional videos.

Wayne Static died after mixing Xanax and other powerful prescription drugs with alcohol, according to the coroner’s report. The 48-year-old Static, whose real name was Wayne Richard Wells, was found dead in his Landers, California home on November 1, 2014.

Static founded STATIC-X in 1994 and achieved commercial success with “Wisconsin Death Trip”, which included the rock radio hit “Push It”.

The group issued five more studio albums before disbanding permanently in June 2013. Static had been pursuing a solo career at the time of his death. 

Listen To New STATIC-X Song ‘Hollow’ From ‘Project Regeneration’ Album

Written By Braddon S Williams aka “The Concert Critic”

On this date in history, 7/12/2019, The Clyde Theatre in Ft. Wayne, IN hosted the triumphant return of Static-X!

When I first heard this tour was being promoted, I have to admit I was more than a little skeptical. Wayne Static passed away in 2014 and presumably took Static-X with him. He was the face and voice of the band, after all. Seeing is believing, and I have seen (and heard) what an incredible job the rest of the remaining members of the band have accomplished.

With the help of a mystery vocalist (announced as “Xero” by the band) who wore an amazing “Wayne” mask, and somehow channeled the very spirit of the late, beloved singer/guitarist, Static-X were suddenly back in all their glory.

This tour not only memorializes the man, but also celebrates the band’s classic debut, 1999’s electrifying Wisconsin Death Trip. Most of the songs in the crushing headlining set were drawn from the album that put Static-X on the map. Bled For Days, I Am, Love Dump, Trance Is The Motion, I’m With Stupid, an absolutely earth shaking Sweat Of The Bud, and the crushing final Push It all literally electrified the rabid audience.

At this point I have to give a bunch of praise to the Clyde Theatre. This was my first time at the venue, and the facility is wonderful. Absolutely state of the art lights and sound contributed to all 4 of the support bands, and made the triumphant return of Static-X a memory I will always treasure. Speaking of support bands; DevilDriver were billed as co-headliners, and Dez Fafara and company brought the fury, never dimming their considerable intensity for a single moment.

The band has undergone a number of personnel and musical changes since I last saw them in 2007’s Ozzfest, but I’m happy to report that the DevilDriver I know and love are still standing tall. They even slipped in a couple of Coal Chamber songs and had the crowd moshing and pumping the horns high and proud throughout.

Dope didn’t fare too well, citing technical difficulties and apologizing profusely. I felt for them, because their stage set up looked fantastic, and as a musician I have been at the mercy of equipment issues. Sometimes it’s just not your night. Hopefully I get a chance to see them again at the same place, but with better results.

Wednesday 13 delivered a delightfully creepy display of metallic shock rock, and aided by the superb lights and sound provided by the Clyde, they came across like confident headliners.

The opening band, Raven Black, show a lot of promise in the same shock rock field, and I have to say that most opening bands in a multiple band showcase don’t get nearly the generous treatment of sound and lights that Raven Black received.

Once again, The Clyde Theatre seems to be doing things the way they should be done. All in all, this was a historic occasion…blending the fierce love and fond memory of a fallen metal icon with the celebration of a different era in metal music. I was fortunate to see Static-X twice in the days when Wayne Static stood out from the pack with that outrageous hair and undeniable talent…and I am thrilled to say that Static-X is back and doing their legacy far beyond proud. Evil Disco is back!

On This Date in History

Written By Braddon S. Williams

Static X: Wisconsin Death Trip

Wisconsin Death Trip (1999), the platinum selling debut by Static-X, was an exciting blast of Industrial Metal or “Evil Disco” if you prefer that title instead.

Led by the distinctive presence of Wayne Static on lead vocals and guitar, Static-X had a highly energetic sound, and killer production on Wisconsin Death Trip.

Everything just exploded out of that mix, and I used several songs off this one to get hyped up back in the day.

Some of my favorites were Sweat Of The Bud, I’m With Stupid, Stem, Push It, Bled For Days, and The Trance Is The Motion.

The title song is a rager, too. Great album, great live band, and Wayne had one of the greatest hair styles in metal.

I can’t adequately describe how awesome he looked. If you don’t already know, just google Wayne and his hair. He has gone to the rock ‘n roll ranch in the sky, but his evil disco lives on.

Influences And Recollections of a Musical Mind

On this date in history, 8/14/2007, Ozzfest made its final stop at Deer Creek. This was the free show that had generated tickets with an online code.  I scored seats on the back row of the center section of the pavilion and they were awesome for both audio and visual enjoyment of the main stage bands. Speaking of bands, this Ozzfest featured Ozzy Osbourne, Lamb Of God, Static-X, Lordi, Black Tide, Hatebreed, Behemoth, DevilDriver, Ankla, Nile, The Showdown, 3 Inches Of Blood, Daath, In This Moment, and Chthonic.

The first band, Chthonic, are from Taipei, Taiwan. They were quite interesting visually and didn’t sound like anything Ive ever heard before. Next up was In This Moment, touring in support of their debut album. Maria Brink was obviously a star in the making, and her vocals have since elevated her band to great success. They played a rock solid set that day.

The next band that I really liked was The Showdown, a more traditional hard rock styled band, but full of attitude and energy just the same. Great vocals and rockin’ tunes gained them some new fans, no doubt about it.

Nile followed with a set of supreme brutality, as the Egyptian themed death metal juggernaut played with crushing precision and confidence, absolutely astonishing technical ability from top to bottom.

I don’t recall much about Ankla, either good or bad, so I’m guessing I must have been distracted or just missed them entirely.

DevilDriver kept the intensity going with their manic metal meltdown providing mosh ready material for their entire set.

The second stage area was a dust bowl that day, and all the really heavy bands had to contend with a continuous white haze of stirred up earth creating a perpetual fog in the air.

I didn’t think it would be possible to be more powerful or heavier than Nile, but somehow Behemoth pulled it off. I can’t even describe how insanely, monstrously METAL their sound was…literally like a seismic, F5 tornado velocity propelling their blackened death metal onslaught.

Hatebreed followed that and suffered somewhat for it. They are always solid, and Jamey Jasta certainly knows how to whip a crowd into a frenzy, but as heavy as Hatebreed is, they couldn’t compete with that performance that proceeded them, in my humble opinion.

All in all, a lot of diversity coupled with some of the heaviest bands ever on the second stage made this final Ozzfest one of the most memorable second stage lineups.

The first band on the main stage was Black Tide, an extremely young band that showed great potential. Nothing exceptional musically, but everyone has to start somewhere, and Ozzfest is a pretty cool place to call a beginning. Lordi were up next, and they were pretty horrible, to be blunt. Borrowing (okay, stealing!) liberally from GWAR, Slipknot, Mushroomhead, and any other band that has ever worn masks, and not bringing anything of musical merit, quickly earned them a hostile reaction from the discerning metal masses.

Static-X set things right with a sizzling performance. Wayne Static led his “evil disco” band through a high energy holocaust of a performance that set the stage for my favorite band of the entire show, the mighty Lamb Of God. LOG crushed all in their path, earning the coveted headliner status and playing directly before Ozzy himself came out and finished the show, and his namesake tour, in grand fashion.

I attended Ozzfest in 10 consecutive years and I have countless memories of those shows. I salute Ozzy for bringing so many great bands on tour and for nurturing so much talent in the heavy metal universe.  Lots of bands that passed through this system became major stars following their association with Ozzfest. That in itself is a pretty amazing legacy.

Written By Braddon S. Williams aka The Concert Critic

On This Date in History

On this date in history, 8/10/2000, I saw my third consecutive Ozzfest at the familiar confines of Deer Creek. The lineup that year included Ozzy Osbourne, Pantera, Godsmack, Static-X, Incubus, Methods Of Mayhem, P.O.D., Queens Of The Stone Age, Taproot, Apartment 26, Soulfly, Kittie, Disturbed, Reveille, Slaves On Dope, Pitchshifter, The Deadlights, Primer 55, and Shuvel.

Out of all those bands, there were only a handful that stood out for me on that day. Soulfly headlined the second stage and rendered all the other bands on that stage null and void with their thunderous tribal warfare.

Max Cavalera stood on the stage like a metal Bob Marley, bringing his people to the promised land of the almighty riff. Queens Of The Stone Age were out of place on this tour, but Josh Homme and company executed their set like ninja assassins, playing with deadly controlled ferocity and elegance.

Incubus were reliably excellent as well. Brandon Boyd sang at a level most metal singers can’t attain, which is to say that Incubus never claimed to be a metal band in the first place. This departure from the norm always suited them and let them separate from the pack in the best way.

Static-X, led by the always unique Wayne Static (R.I.P. Wayne), played their brand of ‘evil disco’ and got the crowd moshing and bouncing throughout their frantic set. Godsmack were the band onstage when the inevitable sod war began. Front man Sully Erna managed to put a quick end to it when he announced that if it didn’t stop, neither Pantera or Ozzy would perform.

Needless to say, the lawn raping came to an abrupt finale then and there. Godsmack played a killer set, but the best was still to come.

PanterA took the stage and top honors for the day. Phil Anselmo’s commanding presence, fearsome vocal power, and drill sergeant crowd control whipped the masses into a crazed volcanic moshing cauldron of humanity.  Dimebag’s guitar cut through our souls and melted all in its sonic path, while Rex Brown’s bass rearranged our chromosomes to Vinnie Paul’s crushing beats.

Ozzy capped it all with a set full of the Ozzman’s finest tunes. Only the Prince Of Darkness himself could follow the Pantera attack and still bring more out of us, but that is precisely what he did. Even on a day where there were quite a few sub par bands, Ozzfest still managed to be the show of the summer.

Written By Braddon S. Williams aka The Concert Critic

On This Date in History

imagesOn this date in history, 6/29/1999, I witnessed my second Ozzfest in the friendly confines of Deer Creek in Noblesville, IN. This one was one of the best lineups they ever had, in my humble opinion, featuring Black Sabbath, Rob Zombie, Deftones, Slayer, Primus, Godsmack, System Of A Down, Apartment 26, all on the main stage, with Fear Factory, Static-X, Puya, Slipknot, Hed (Pe), Flashpoint, Pushmonkey, and Drain S.T.H. on the second stage. 88a04e3ef23045e4c5f262e8039b09df

For some unknown reason even to myself, I didn’t see any of the second stage bands that year, but I have heard from many sources that the first Indiana appearance of Slipknot was legendary. I know that Static-X and Fear Factory likely delivered crushing sets as well.

This was a concert of firsts for me. I saw System Of A Down, Godsmack, Slayer, and the mighty Black Sabbath for the first time at this show. I had seen Rob Zombie with White Zombie, but this was also the first time I saw him solo.

System Of A Down were up there doing what they do, and I was having a hard time wrapping my ears around it, having never properly heard them yet, but I started watching this guy who knew every word to every song and through his enthusiasm I caught their passion and became a fan instantly.

I went out and bought their debut cd the following day. Primus provided another first as they brought out Buckethead for an utterly mind blowing guitar solo segment during their performance. They also delighted the crowd by performing their self-penned theme song from the South Park tv show, creating a frenzied mosh pit that would have made Eric Cartman proud.

Speaking of frenzied mosh pits, Slayer came next and incinerated the playing field with their Slaytanic assault, melting faces and unleashing their legendary fury. I felt a little sorry for Deftones, who had to follow the blitzkrieg, but they are an amazing band in their own right, and they played great, as usual.

Rob Zombie put on a stunning visual overload type of show that he has made his career on, and proving beyond a doubt that he is one of the best metal headliners around. During “Thunder Kiss ’65”, Kerry King from Slayer joined Zombie on stage to deliver a ghoulish masterpiece.

imagesWhen Black Sabbath finally took the stage they opened with “War Pigs” and all the hair on my neck and arms literally stood up. I can’t begin to describe the glorious totality of that SOUND…Sabbath is like the slow moving lava cruising down the side of Mt. Doom, crushing all in its path in this infinitely compelling darkness. Without them, metal would have still been born one way or the other, but thankfully it WAS born with them, and this Ozzfest will always hold a special place in my heart. Sabbath and Slayer for the first time at the same concert? Yeah, that pretty much ruled!

Written By Braddon S. Williams aka The Concert Critic

 

On This Date in History