Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Radiohead; Creep Off The Album Pablo Honey 1993

When asked about the song in 1993, lead singer Thom Yorke said, “I have a real problem being a man in the ’90s… Any man with any sensitivity or conscience toward the opposite sex would have a problem. To actually assert yourself in a masculine way without looking like you’re in a hard-rock band is a very difficult thing to do… It comes back to the music we write, which is not effeminate, but it’s not brutal in its arrogance. It is one of the things I’m always trying: To assert a sexual persona and on the other hand trying desperately to negate it.”

On the other hand, guitarist/keyboardist Jonny Greenwood said the song was in fact a happy song about “recognizing what you are.”

Yorke says this is about being in love with someone, but not feeling good enough. He describes the feeling as, “There’s the beautiful people and then there’s the rest of us.”

Yorke wrote this in 1987 while he was a student at Exeter University in England. He first recorded it acoustic.

This was written before the band formed. Yorke gave his demo version to Colin Greenwood, who joined him and helped put the band together.

This wasn’t released in the US until Radiohead’s debut album in 1993. The band finished college and signed their record deal in 1991.

On the album version, Thom Yorke sings, “You’re so f–king special.” For radio, he recut it as, “You’re so very special.” Yorke regrets changing the line for the radio version, saying it disturbed the “sentiment of the song.” According to him, the song lost its anger as a result.The video, directed by Brett Turnbull, was recorded at a club in Oxford called The Zodiac.

One of the extras in the crowd scenes is a teenage Kieran Hebden, aka Four Tet. The producer and DJ has remixed Thom Yorke and Radiohead tracks and also supported Radiohead on tour.

This is nicknamed “Crap” by the band due its slacker-anthem ubiquity.

When this was first released in England in 1992, the song flopped. It did well when it was re-released a year later, after Radiohead grew a fan base.

The three blasts of guitar noise that precede the chorus was the result of Jonny Greenwood trying to sabotage a tune he considered too “wimpy.”

Yorke claims he received fan mail from “murderers” saying how much they could relate to this song.

According to the book Radiohead: Hysterical and Useless, this song was inspired by Thom’s obsession with a stranger. He was infatuated with a woman who was out of his league, who he’d never met but frequently saw in bars, and he found himself following her around. When he finally got himself drunk enough to build up the courage to confess his obsession, she freaked out.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Radiohead; Creep Off The Album Pablo Honey 1993

When asked about the song in 1993, lead singer Thom Yorke said, “I have a real problem being a man in the ’90s… Any man with any sensitivity or conscience toward the opposite sex would have a problem. To actually assert yourself in a masculine way without looking like you’re in a hard-rock band is a very difficult thing to do… It comes back to the music we write, which is not effeminate, but it’s not brutal in its arrogance. It is one of the things I’m always trying: To assert a sexual persona and on the other hand trying desperately to negate it.”

On the other hand, guitarist/keyboardist Jonny Greenwood said the song was in fact a happy song about “recognizing what you are.”

Yorke says this is about being in love with someone, but not feeling good enough. He describes the feeling as, “There’s the beautiful people and then there’s the rest of us.”

Yorke wrote this in 1987 while he was a student at Exeter University in England. He first recorded it acoustic.

This was written before the band formed. Yorke gave his demo version to Colin Greenwood, who joined him and helped put the band together.

This wasn’t released in the US until Radiohead’s debut album in 1993. The band finished college and signed their record deal in 1991.

On the album version, Thom Yorke sings, “You’re so f–king special.” For radio, he recut it as, “You’re so very special.” Yorke regrets changing the line for the radio version, saying it disturbed the “sentiment of the song.” According to him, the song lost its anger as a result.The video, directed by Brett Turnbull, was recorded at a club in Oxford called The Zodiac.

One of the extras in the crowd scenes is a teenage Kieran Hebden, aka Four Tet. The producer and DJ has remixed Thom Yorke and Radiohead tracks and also supported Radiohead on tour.

This is nicknamed “Crap” by the band due its slacker-anthem ubiquity.

When this was first released in England in 1992, the song flopped. It did well when it was re-released a year later, after Radiohead grew a fan base.

The three blasts of guitar noise that precede the chorus was the result of Jonny Greenwood trying to sabotage a tune he considered too “wimpy.”

Yorke claims he received fan mail from “murderers” saying how much they could relate to this song.

According to the book Radiohead: Hysterical and Useless, this song was inspired by Thom’s obsession with a stranger. He was infatuated with a woman who was out of his league, who he’d never met but frequently saw in bars, and he found himself following her around. When he finally got himself drunk enough to build up the courage to confess his obsession, she freaked out.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

A History of Gwar, the Best Satirical Extraterrestrial Metal Band Ever.

Say what you will about their Satanic-looking masks, gnarly R-rated-Jim-Henson-warrior outfits, and strapped-on penis appendages – no band has ever made monster metal like Gwar. Then again, when a band essentially creates its own genre from scratch, they really don’t have much competition.

Born in 1984 out of the Richmond, Virginia artist collective known as Slave Pit, Gwar embodies a certain kind of rock sensibility that seems like the brainchild of a metal-loving teenager who would go on to become a performance artist. Their band members have names like Oderus Urungus (“undying chaos demon” the late Dave Brockie) and Balsac the Jaws of Death (Mike Dirks)

Following the death of frontman and lead singer Dave Brockie in 2014, the group has continued without any of its founding members. As part of their mythos, are a group of intergalactic “chaos warriors” that were banished to Earth and became “the sickest band in metal history.” (They also throw really great “Gwar-B-Qs.”)

But beyond the fun, shock-and-awe value of a lot of the memorabilia, there’s also the story of an artist collective and a movement that set itself apart from the hardcore punk in nearby Washington, D.C. in the early 1980s by mixing its social commentary with monster masks, satire, and political commentary. The exhibit will also show how the band’s mythology and decidedly intense live shows fostered a unique fan community that emerged before social media and has persisted for three decades – from the 1980s to Beavis and Butt-Head and beyond.

“I think people don’t always see Gwar as being in the context of theater,” Benjamin Thorp, the exhibit’s curator, told WIRED. “We understand theater as being this massive undertaking that takes years to develop – to create props, sets, narratives, production, drawings, budgets, and all of this stuff that we’re presenting – I think it puts them in the context I believe they deserve to be viewed in.”

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Rock Bitch

Rockbitch were an expat, British, mostly female, metal band, who performed nude and incorporated sexual acts and Pagan rituals into their performances.Associated acts.

The band was originally formed (as Red Abyss) by bassist Amanda Smith-Skinner from the members of a free sex commune, where monogamy is outlawed. Musically, Red Abyss drew on jazz, funk and rock influences dominated by singer Julie’s Janis Joplin-influenced vocals. In time Red Abyss’s music became harder edged, drawing on punk and metal influences. As its line-up changed, this led to a name change to Rockbitch. Rockbitch was nearly ready to call it a day due to the apathy of male-dominated rock audiences.

At what was intended to be their last gig (at a biker festival) Rockbitch decided to put the wild sex of their home life into the stage act. They went down a storm and decided to continue touring in order to spread their pro-sex message. The most infamous part of their stage act was “The Golden Condom” contest. This involved throwing the so-called golden condom out into the audience. Whoever caught it (man or woman) was taken backstage for sex with one or more band members. The intention of this was to prove the band were not just an act and were ready to stand by their beliefs.

Rockbitch toured widely from the late ’90s until 2002, meeting increasing resistance from authorities, particularly English town councils who were constantly banning gigs. Large sections of their audience (particularly in England) tended to consist of drunken lads just wanting to see some nudity, with no interest in the message. However Rockbitch also began to attract a small following of men and women who seemingly understood the band’s message and had their lives changed forever. Outside the UK (particularly in Holland) they sometimes played to more sympathetic audiences. However, in Germany they suffered many censorship problems.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Herbert Butros Khaury, known also as Herbert Buckingham Khaury and known professionally as Tiny Tim, was an American singer, ukulele player, and musical archivist.

He had a hit with “Tip Toe Through the Tulips With Me” and guest-starred on shows like Laugh-In and The Tonight Show.

Born on April 12, 1932, Tiny Tim performed as a singer and guitar/ukulele player in 1960s Greenwich Village before making guest appearances on Laugh-In and The Ed Sullivan Show. Known for his distinctive falsetto, he had a hit with his remake of “Tip-Toe Through the Tulips With Me.” His wedding to his fiancée Miss Vicki on The Tonight Show also drew the most viewers in the show’s history. He died on November 30, 1996.

Eventually adopting the name Tiny Tim, from the Charles Dickens character, he began performing in clubs in the busy Greenwich Village music scene. He also played at talent shows and parties, often using different names. His parents tried to dissuade him from pursuing a career in music, but Tiny Tim was committed. An appearance in the movie You Are What You Eat (1968) led to Tim getting booked on Rowan and Martins Laugh In, a hugely popular television variety show.

His high-pitched, falsetto voice, ukulele playing and unusual appearance (Tim was over 6 feet tall and wore his dark, curly hair to his shoulders) surprised Dan Rowan; but Tiny Tim was a novelty hit. He appeared several more times on Laugh In and became a regular on Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show. Tiny Tim continued to record, tour and enjoy his celebrity status.

Tiny Tim first married, on the Tonight Show, in 1969, but he and his wife, Victoria Mae Budinger, mostly lived apart. They divorced after eight years and one child, daughter Victoria Tulip. Tiny Tim would go on to marry two more times, each time living separately from his wives.

Tiny Tim suffered a heart attack while appearing at a ukulele festival in Massachusetts in 1996. Released from the hospital after three weeks, he was warned to give up his touring and performing. Tiny Tim chose to pursue his art, however, and suffered a fatal heart attack in Minneapolis on November 30, 1996. He left the stage after performing “Tip-Toe Through the Tulips,” his signature song, and died an hour later.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Rhythm & Blues” Edition, where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Led Zeppelin, Since Ive Been Loving You, Album: Led Zeppelin III 1970

The Greatest Led Zeppelin Blues Song might be their most melancholy of all. Released in 1970 on their third record, “Since I’ve Been Loving You,” as so many blues songs do, tells the tale of a hard-working man and a up-to-no-good cheating woman who has caused him to “lose his worried mind.” Minus an intro lick borrowed from the Yardbirds’ song “New York City Blues,” it’s a wholly original composition that features some of the best guitar work Page ever laid down – as well as some of the most bombastic vocals Robert Plant was ever able to belt out. For the musicianship, the minor-key swing and the downright depressing content it is undoubtedly the best blues number in Zeppelin’s vast back catalog.A seven-and-a-half minute blues number with some electric piano played by Led Zeppelin bass player John Paul Jones, this was a live favorite for the band. They started working on the song during the sessions for Led Zeppelin II, but was bumped for “Whole Lotta Love.” By the time they recorded it for Led Zeppelin III, they had worked out the song in live performances, but according to Jimmy Page, it was still the hardest track to record for the album. The guitarist says they were getting very self-critical around this time.

Before this song was committed to tape, Led Zeppelin performed it at their famous January 9, 1970 concert at Royal Albert Hall in London. The show was filmed and recorded, but the keyboards didn’t make it into the mix on this track, so the song was not included on the 2003 DVD Led Zeppelin, which featured footage from the show.

This is a very difficult song to sing, and it showed off Robert Plant’s vocal range quite well. He said in a 2003 interview with Mojo: “The musical progression at the end of each verse – the chord choice – is not a natural place to go. And it’s that lift up there that’s so regal and so emotional. I don’t know whether that was born from the loins of JP or JPJ, but I know that when we reached that point in the song you could get a lump in the throat from being in the middle of it.”

This was recorded live in the studio with very little overdubbing. If you listen carefully, you can hear the squeak of John Bonham’s drum pedal.

Jimmy Page did his guitar solo in one take. Engineer Terry Manning called it “The best rock guitar solo of all time.”Plant used a sample from this on his solo track “White, Clean, and Neat.”

Just before their Physical Grafitti tour, Jimmy Page broke the tip of his left ring finger in a door-slamming incident. They went on with the tour but they had to drop this and “Dazed And Confused” from the set lists as he couldn’t play them until his finger healed.

The riff in the beginning is taken from “New York City Blues” by The Yardbirds – Jimmy Page was not a member of that band yet when the group wrote that song.

The track was recorded live (except for the vocals part and a few overdubs) at Island Studios in London. This features John Paul Jones on both bass pedal and organ. Interestingly, Jimmy Page’s famous solo was recorded in a studio in Memphis, whereas the whole album was recorded in Headley Grange and in Island Studios.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series, “Rhythm & Blues” Edition, where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Billie Holiday, Strange Fruit Album: The Billie Holiday Story 1939

It’s impossible to overstate the importance of Billie Holiday. Although her voice was small and raspy, she interpreted songs from Tin Pan Alley with a rhythmic and melodic inventiveness that transformed the tunes into highly personal expressions.

She made her first recordings at the age of 18 in 1933 and her last in 1959 shortly before her death. In between those years she changed the art of jazz and pop singing. She influenced everyone from Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra to contemporary singers Madeleine Peyroux and Norah Jones.

Strange fruit was written by a white, Jewish schoolteacher and union activist from New York City named Abel Meeropol, who was outraged after seeing a photograph of a horrific lynching in a civil-rights magazine. The photo was a shot of two black men hanging from a tree after they had been lynched in Marion, Indiana on August 7, 1930. The two men are the “Strange Fruit.”

The original title was “Bitter Fruit,” and the song started as a poem Meeropol wrote. The poem was published in the January 1937 issue of a union publication called The New York Teacher. After putting music to it, the song was performed regularly at various left-wing gatherings. Meeropol’s wife and friends from the local teachers’ union would sing it, but it was also performed by a black vocalist named Laura Duncan, who once performed it at Madison Square Garden.

This was performed by a quartet of black singers during an antifascist fundraiser at a show put on by Robert Gordon, who was also working on the floor show at a club called Cafe Society. Billie Holiday had just quit Artie Shaw’s band and was the featured attraction at the club, and Gordon brought the song to her attention and suggested she sing it. Holiday played to an integrated audience at the Cafe Society, and her version popularized the song.

Meeropol made headlines when he adopted the orphan sons of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg after their parents were executed for treason in 1953. He also wrote the lyrics to the song “The House I Live In,” which was recorded by Frank Sinatra, as well as “Beloved Comrade,” which was often sung in tributes to Franklin Roosevelt, and “Apples, Peaches, and Cherries,” which was recorded by Peggy Lee. Meeropol died in 1986.

In 1971, Meeropol said, “I wrote ‘Strange Fruit’ because I hate lynching, I hate injustice, and I hate the people who perpetuate it.”

Victims of lynchings were people who were marginalized from society, and most were black men. They were lynched for a variety of reasons, often because they did something to upset a prominent member of the community, who would then organize a mob to track down and kill the victim. Many times, the victims broke no laws but were lynched out of jealousy, hatred or religious difference. In America, lynchings were more common in the South, but could happen anywhere.

In a lynching, people could be hanged, burned, dragged behind cars and killed in a number of different ways. Most lynchings were carried out by small, clandestine groups, but some were public spectacles. The one that inspired this song was in front of about 5,000 people in Marion, Indiana. Extra excursion cars were set up on trains so people could come to watch.In her autobiography, Holiday’s cover of this song made it more mainstream.

Meeropol often had other people put his poems to music, but with this he did it himself.

Columbia Records, Holiday’s label, refused to release this. She had to release it on Commodore Records, a much smaller label.

This was always the last song Holiday played at her concerts. It signaled that the show was over. (Thanks to Gode Davis, director of the film American Lynching for his help with these Songfacts. You can learn more about this song in David Margolick’s book Strange Fruit.

In 1999, Time magazine voted this the Song of the Century. When the song first came out it was denounced by the same magazine as “A piece of musical propaganda.”

Nona Hendryx would often perform this song, adding in parts of Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I Have A Dream” speech. Hendryx told us: “It’s a cathartic performance for me to do that song. It’s like healing, and healing’s what happens. And hopefully it can reach the ears and the minds and the hearts of people who are still feeling any bigotry, hatred, racism, to understand that this was a painful time in our history, in our past and in America. And that we need to move on from there.”

Psychedelic Lunch