Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Radiohead; Creep Off The Album Pablo Honey 1993

When asked about the song in 1993, lead singer Thom Yorke said, “I have a real problem being a man in the ’90s… Any man with any sensitivity or conscience toward the opposite sex would have a problem. To actually assert yourself in a masculine way without looking like you’re in a hard-rock band is a very difficult thing to do… It comes back to the music we write, which is not effeminate, but it’s not brutal in its arrogance. It is one of the things I’m always trying: To assert a sexual persona and on the other hand trying desperately to negate it.”

On the other hand, guitarist/keyboardist Jonny Greenwood said the song was in fact a happy song about “recognizing what you are.”

Yorke says this is about being in love with someone, but not feeling good enough. He describes the feeling as, “There’s the beautiful people and then there’s the rest of us.”

Yorke wrote this in 1987 while he was a student at Exeter University in England. He first recorded it acoustic.

This was written before the band formed. Yorke gave his demo version to Colin Greenwood, who joined him and helped put the band together.

This wasn’t released in the US until Radiohead’s debut album in 1993. The band finished college and signed their record deal in 1991.

On the album version, Thom Yorke sings, “You’re so f–king special.” For radio, he recut it as, “You’re so very special.” Yorke regrets changing the line for the radio version, saying it disturbed the “sentiment of the song.” According to him, the song lost its anger as a result.The video, directed by Brett Turnbull, was recorded at a club in Oxford called The Zodiac.

One of the extras in the crowd scenes is a teenage Kieran Hebden, aka Four Tet. The producer and DJ has remixed Thom Yorke and Radiohead tracks and also supported Radiohead on tour.

This is nicknamed “Crap” by the band due its slacker-anthem ubiquity.

When this was first released in England in 1992, the song flopped. It did well when it was re-released a year later, after Radiohead grew a fan base.

The three blasts of guitar noise that precede the chorus was the result of Jonny Greenwood trying to sabotage a tune he considered too “wimpy.”

Yorke claims he received fan mail from “murderers” saying how much they could relate to this song.

According to the book Radiohead: Hysterical and Useless, this song was inspired by Thom’s obsession with a stranger. He was infatuated with a woman who was out of his league, who he’d never met but frequently saw in bars, and he found himself following her around. When he finally got himself drunk enough to build up the courage to confess his obsession, she freaked out.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Radiohead; Creep Off The Album Pablo Honey 1993

When asked about the song in 1993, lead singer Thom Yorke said, “I have a real problem being a man in the ’90s… Any man with any sensitivity or conscience toward the opposite sex would have a problem. To actually assert yourself in a masculine way without looking like you’re in a hard-rock band is a very difficult thing to do… It comes back to the music we write, which is not effeminate, but it’s not brutal in its arrogance. It is one of the things I’m always trying: To assert a sexual persona and on the other hand trying desperately to negate it.”

On the other hand, guitarist/keyboardist Jonny Greenwood said the song was in fact a happy song about “recognizing what you are.”

Yorke says this is about being in love with someone, but not feeling good enough. He describes the feeling as, “There’s the beautiful people and then there’s the rest of us.”

Yorke wrote this in 1987 while he was a student at Exeter University in England. He first recorded it acoustic.

This was written before the band formed. Yorke gave his demo version to Colin Greenwood, who joined him and helped put the band together.

This wasn’t released in the US until Radiohead’s debut album in 1993. The band finished college and signed their record deal in 1991.

On the album version, Thom Yorke sings, “You’re so f–king special.” For radio, he recut it as, “You’re so very special.” Yorke regrets changing the line for the radio version, saying it disturbed the “sentiment of the song.” According to him, the song lost its anger as a result.The video, directed by Brett Turnbull, was recorded at a club in Oxford called The Zodiac.

One of the extras in the crowd scenes is a teenage Kieran Hebden, aka Four Tet. The producer and DJ has remixed Thom Yorke and Radiohead tracks and also supported Radiohead on tour.

This is nicknamed “Crap” by the band due its slacker-anthem ubiquity.

When this was first released in England in 1992, the song flopped. It did well when it was re-released a year later, after Radiohead grew a fan base.

The three blasts of guitar noise that precede the chorus was the result of Jonny Greenwood trying to sabotage a tune he considered too “wimpy.”

Yorke claims he received fan mail from “murderers” saying how much they could relate to this song.

According to the book Radiohead: Hysterical and Useless, this song was inspired by Thom’s obsession with a stranger. He was infatuated with a woman who was out of his league, who he’d never met but frequently saw in bars, and he found himself following her around. When he finally got himself drunk enough to build up the courage to confess his obsession, she freaked out.

Psychedelic Lunch

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

Mushroomhead – are one of the most unique and adventurous alternative metal bands working today. Known for their stunningly theatrical live show and artsy masks, this innovative band has forged new ground in the rock world and influenced many other bands to push the envelope and bring art into rock. Formed in the early-1990s in Cleveland Ohio, the band’s combination of metal, rock and atmospheric elements has struck a chord with thousands of fans worldwide.

Mushroomhead have been performing incognito since 1993, when drummer Skinny founded the band. The band was meant to be a side-project so they wore masks to go unrecognized, but after only a few shows they developed a rabid and loyal fan base in Cleveland. Mushroomhead released their 1995 self-titled debut album independently and it went on to became an underground hit. This was history in the making because the band really had no proper distribution. Superbuick followed in 1996 and M3 in 1999, all released via an underground street effort.

After the band felt its image and hyper-melodic, heavy style of music was being diluted by other bands jumping into this space, the band started to change their look to reflect nothing out there. After a brief stint on Eclipse Records, a move to Universal Records saw the release of XX (a combination of the past independent releases) in 2001 and XIII in 2003. The band’s last album sold over 200,000 units in the USA alone. Mushroomhead released Savior Sorrow for the pioneering rock label, Megaforce Records (Metallica, Anthrax, Ministry, Warren Haynes, Bad Brains) in 2006. Mushroomhead released “Beautiful Stories for Ugly Children” in the Fall of 2010 and it debuted at #44 on Billboard charts.

It can be said that Mushroomhead’s musical ascendance was a singular, original, aesthetic of eight guys decked out in matching jumpsuits and artsy masks, playing unbelievable, unsettling music. No other band was wearing masks and jumpsuits and purveying this type of ultra-melodic, ultra-dynamic music at the time – Mushroomhead sounded like nothing else. The band’s merging of metal, atmospheric elements, rock, and theatrics mixed with a punk DIY attitude has inspired and spawned other bands. Even though Mushroomhead’s music is rock-leaning in thought, the group remains firmly committed to pushing the envelope and trying new things.

Influences range from the driving rhythms and breakneck turns of Pantera, to the dark melodies of Faith No More, to the atmospheric stylings of Pink Floyd, but all done in Mushroomhead style.

Psychedelic Lunch

Ozzy Osbourne is known as “the Prince of Darkness” and for his crazy antics on stage and off, but the singer and and entertainment personality is opening up about something more serious.

In an exclusive interview with Robin Roberts for “Good Morning America,” the legendary rocker, his children and his wife and manager, Sharon Osbourne, are shedding light on the private health battle he experienced after a fall and Parkinson’s diagnosis last February.

“It’s been terribly challenging for us all,” Osbourne told Roberts. “I did my last show New Year’s Eve at The Forum. Then I had a bad fall. I had to have surgery on my neck, which screwed all my nerves.”

To complicate the matters further, Osbourne revealed he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that progresses slowly in most people, and has no cure.

“It’s PRKN 2,” said his wife, Sharon. “There’s so many different types of Parkinson’s; it’s not a death sentence by any stretch of the imagination, but it does affect certain nerves in your body. And it’s — it’s like you have a good day, a good day, and then a really bad day.”

Sharon and Ozzy Osbourne speak with ABC News’ Robin Roberts.

Osbourne postponed his world tour and remained largely secluded while he recovered at home. Now, he’s on the mend, revealing that he’s on Parkinson’s medication and taking nerve pills.

“I got a numbness down this arm for the surgery, my legs keep going cold,” he said. “I don’t know if that’s the Parkinson’s or what, you know, but that’s — see, that’s the problem. Because they cut nerves when they did the surgery. I’d never heard of nerve pain, and it’s a weird feeling.”

This wasn’t the first time Osbourne has battled rumors about his health. Before his diagnosis, Osbourne, who spent 50 years on the road and lived a very public life while on his family’s popular reality TV show “The Osbournes,” has battled rumors about his physical state, even at one point, denying he had Parkinson’s.MORE: Woman with Parkinson’s disease surprised with service dog

Now, the rock star is coming clean and letting his fans know about what’s been going on.

“I’m no good with secrets. I cannot walk around with it anymore ’cause it’s like I’m running out of excuses, you know?”

In his family, it was his son, Jack, and his daughter Kelly, who first realized that something wasn’t right with their dad.

“The hardest thing is watching somebody that you love suffer,” Kelly told “Good Morning America.”

Kelly opened up about what life has been like for their family in the past year even if it was difficult to face their new reality head on

Kelly Osbourne, Ozzy Osbourne, Sharon Osbourne and Jack Osbourne attend the Pride of Britain awards, Sept. 28, 2015, in London.

“It’s kind of become a bit of — I think a role reversal for us, where we have to be like, ‘Snap out of it. Come on we — we have to all admit what’s happening here,’ so that we can get over this. And it took a while for everyone to be on the same page.”

In a way, Osbourne’s diagnosis has brought his family together and has helped them find strength in each other.

“We’ve all learned so much about each other again — and it’s reaffirmed how strong we are,” said Kelly, who admitted that her father’s diagnosis has helped her and her brother become closer over the past year.

Osbourne’s son, Jack, who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2012, said he can relate to his father.

“I understand when you have something you don’t want to have — but if he wants to talk, and if not — I try to slip in information,” said Jack.

Although his family has helped him tremendously over the past year and has been there for him to lean on, Osbourne admits that it’s been an adjustment at home.

“Coming from a working class background, I hate to let people down. I hate to not do my job,” said Osbourne. “And so when I see my wife goin’ to work, my kids goin’ to work, everybody’s doing — tryin’ to be helpful to me, that gets me down because I can’t contribute to my family, you know.”

“But you know, put it this way — I’m a lot better now than I was last February. I was in a shocking state.”

As a family, the Osbournes were able to help get their father back on his feet and in the studio.

“We have all played a role,” said Kelly. “But the only thing I know is what can I do to make him smile? I know going to the studio makes him happy. That’s what I did. Everything else was him.”

With the support of his family, Osbourne is on the road to recovery and is even turning to doctors outside the U.S. for other forms of treatment.

“We’ve kind of reached a point here in this country where we can’t go any further because we’ve got all the answers we can get here,” said Sharon. “So in April — we’re going to a professional in Switzerland. And he deals with — getting your immune system at its peak.”

Ozzy Osbourne breaks his silence on his battle with Parkinson’s disease

Welcome to our “Psychedelic Lunch” series where we find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes and explore psychedelic tunes from the 60’s to today. Weekdays At Noon EST. Enjoy the trip!

A History of Gwar, the Best Satirical Extraterrestrial Metal Band Ever.

Say what you will about their Satanic-looking masks, gnarly R-rated-Jim-Henson-warrior outfits, and strapped-on penis appendages – no band has ever made monster metal like Gwar. Then again, when a band essentially creates its own genre from scratch, they really don’t have much competition.

Born in 1984 out of the Richmond, Virginia artist collective known as Slave Pit, Gwar embodies a certain kind of rock sensibility that seems like the brainchild of a metal-loving teenager who would go on to become a performance artist. Their band members have names like Oderus Urungus (“undying chaos demon” the late Dave Brockie) and Balsac the Jaws of Death (Mike Dirks)

Following the death of frontman and lead singer Dave Brockie in 2014, the group has continued without any of its founding members. As part of their mythos, are a group of intergalactic “chaos warriors” that were banished to Earth and became “the sickest band in metal history.” (They also throw really great “Gwar-B-Qs.”)

But beyond the fun, shock-and-awe value of a lot of the memorabilia, there’s also the story of an artist collective and a movement that set itself apart from the hardcore punk in nearby Washington, D.C. in the early 1980s by mixing its social commentary with monster masks, satire, and political commentary. The exhibit will also show how the band’s mythology and decidedly intense live shows fostered a unique fan community that emerged before social media and has persisted for three decades – from the 1980s to Beavis and Butt-Head and beyond.

“I think people don’t always see Gwar as being in the context of theater,” Benjamin Thorp, the exhibit’s curator, told WIRED. “We understand theater as being this massive undertaking that takes years to develop – to create props, sets, narratives, production, drawings, budgets, and all of this stuff that we’re presenting – I think it puts them in the context I believe they deserve to be viewed in.”

Psychedelic Lunch

Nita Strauss, the Los Angeles-based guitar shredder for the ALICE COOPER band, was was again in attendance at this year’s NAMM convention in Anaheim, California for the launch of the latest additions to the Ibanez Nita Strauss signature JIVA family: the new JIVA X, JIVA10 and JIVA Junior models.

Video footage of Strauss shredding the axe on January 17 during the 2020 NAMM can be seen below (courtesy of YouTube user Clyde Shenefield).

Nita recently admitted that she initially had some reservations about putting out an album of instrumentals with her debut solo LP, 2018’s “Controlled Chaos”.

“I always thought that instrumental music was for ‘better guitar players’ than me,” she wrote in an Instagrampost. “I listened to it, but it took me a long time (and a push from [Steve Vai]) to find the faith in my ability that I could do it. That’s a weird thought now that I look back on it, but let’s face it — writing music that’s essentially all solos is intimidating. It wasn’t until I started writing ‘Controlled Chaos’ that I realized there was a part of me that NEEDED to express myself that way.”

She continued: “An instrumental song is one of the most pure forms of expression. It can be about whatever the listener needs it to be in that moment… just pure emotion, without being restricted by the use of words. I love that about it.

“Carving this new path as a solo artist has truly been one of my most cherished experiences of the decade and I can’t wait to see where this second album takes me as I write it.”

Nita‘s second solo LP is tentatively due in late 2020.

The guitarist’s live show is mostly instrumental in nature, combining originals with covers.

Strauss has been playing with Alice Cooper since 2014 when she replaced Australian musician and former Michael Jackson player Orianthi. She joined Alice in time for a mammoth MÖTLEY CRÜE tour. She was recommended to Cooper by the legendary rocker’s former bass player and WINGER frontman Kip Winger.

Watch NITA STRAUSS Shred At This Year’s NAMM

IN THIS MOMENT will release its seventh album, “Mother”, on March 27 via Roadrunner/Atlantic. Today, the band has shared the video for first single “The In-Between”, a sonically gorgeous labyrinth of sound steered by frontwoman Maria Brink‘s beguiling vocals, which swirl around guitarist Chris Howorth‘s heavier-than-granite riffing.

“Mother” was once again recorded at The Hideout Recording Studio in Las Vegas, Nevada with producer Kevin Churko. The disc features guest appearances by Lzzy Hale (HALESTORM), Taylor Momsen (THE PRETTY RECKLESS) and Joe Cotella (DED).

“Mother” track listing:

01. Fly Like An Eagle 
02. The In-Between (Hell & Heaven) 
03. Legacy 
04. We Will Rock You (feat. Lzzy Hale, Taylor Momsen) 
05. Mother 
06. As Above, So Below 
07. Born In Flames 
08. God Is She 
09. Holy Man 
10. Hunting Grounds (feat. Joe Cotella) 
11. Lay Me Down 
12. Into Dust

Last fall, IN THIS MOMENT began playing another new song called “Legacy” during its concerts.

Howorth told the 99.7 The Blitz radio station about “Mother”: “It’s kind of an extension of [2017’s] ‘Ritual’. And the reason we thought of ‘Mother’… It’s a lot of different things, but a lot of the fans call Maria [BrinkIN THIS MOMENT singer] ‘mom,’ for one. They’re always, like, ‘Maria‘s my mom’ and ‘Mother Maria‘ and all this. That was always kind of there. We were actually even talking about it for the last album, but I felt like maybe we weren’t ready for it yet. But it’s also ‘mother’ in the sense of ‘Mother Earth,’ the creation of life — all these things that mother has such significance for. Mother is kind of connected to everything. So, in all that sense, it’s really cool and it gives us a lot to pool from. And Maria‘s a mom; she was raised by her mom; everybody has a mom, in some sense. So, that whole concept is kind of what we were going for. With the extension of ‘Ritual’, the album before, and some of the imagery with that, the ritualistic, pagan kind of feel.”

IN THIS MOMENT recently announced a spring 2020 headlining tour, dubbed “The In-Between Tour”. Support on the trek will come from BLACK VEIL BRIDESDED and RAVEN BLACK.

Originally formed by Brink and Howorth in 2005, IN THIS MOMENT released its debut album, “Beautiful Tragedy”, in 2007. Their 2014 album “Black Widow”landed at No. 8 on the Billboard 200 and No. 3 on the Hard Rock Albums chart.

Video Premiere: IN THIS MOMENT’s ‘The In-Between’